Video from Pennsylvania's highest point

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Castlereagh

 
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by Castlereagh » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:01 pm

James_W wrote:I can't help if some people get sensitive about a place I have had amazing times out in the mountains, what I am saying is true.


You find your digs to be amazing. That's your truth.

The OP finds Mt. Davis to be amazing. That's his truth.

Why argue?

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rasgoat

 
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by rasgoat » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:02 pm

mrchad9 wrote:If you think 'it's all good' then you obviously have never lived in Houston.


Damn, I just mapquested Big Bend from your location, 9 1/2 hours is alot.

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mrchad9

 
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by mrchad9 » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:08 pm

rasgoat wrote:
mrchad9 wrote:If you think 'it's all good' then you obviously have never lived in Houston.


Damn, I just mapquested Big Bend from your location, 9 1/2 hours is alot.

LOL!!!

But not my location! I lived there from 1998-2000. That was enough!

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butitsadryheat

 
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by butitsadryheat » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:12 pm

Houston is a great place...to be from.

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chugach mtn boy

 
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by chugach mtn boy » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:15 pm

James_W wrote: ... the only old growth inland rainforest on earth ...


Say what? I can think of a few others. Heck, there's even a little one in the East, isn't there--uncut parts of the west slope of GSMNP? And then we could assemble quite a list in central Africa ... and there's that river basin in South America, starts with an A I think ...

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rasgoat

 
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by rasgoat » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:18 pm

JamesW, Your area looks amazing, I hope one day to be able to live so close to such coolness & have good friends to be there with but, I need to know, do you work for the Canadian tourism council or something?

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James_W

 
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by James_W » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:18 pm

chugach mtn boy wrote:
James_W wrote: ... the only old growth inland rainforest on earth ...


Say what? I can think of a few others. Heck, there's even a little one in the East, isn't there--uncut parts of the west slope of GSMNP? And then we could assemble quite a list in central Africa ... and there's that river basin in South America, starts with an A I think ...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Reve ... ional_Park

The park contains part of the world's only temperate inland rain forest. Steep, rugged mountains can be found in a warm, moist climate. A variety of plant and animal life is typical with stands of old-growth Western Redcedar and Western Hemlock, a forest type which is rapidly declining outside of protected areas. The park's inland rainforest also has an isolated population of banana slugs which marks the eastern boundary of their distribution in North America.

I see it even on the National Parks documents I have here.

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James_W

 
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by James_W » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:20 pm

rasgoat wrote:JamesW, Your area looks amazing, I hope one day to be able to live so close to such coolness & have good friends to be there with but, I need to know, do you work for the Canadian tourism council or something?


My roommate does but Canada sells itself ;)

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chugach mtn boy

 
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by chugach mtn boy » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:27 pm

James_W wrote:
chugach mtn boy wrote:
James_W wrote: ... the only old growth inland rainforest on earth ...


Say what? I can think of a few others. Heck, there's even a little one in the East, isn't there--uncut parts of the west slope of GSMNP? And then we could assemble quite a list in central Africa ... and there's that river basin in South America, starts with an A I think ...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Reve ... ional_Park

The park contains part of the world's only temperate inland rain forest. Steep, rugged mountains can be found in a warm, moist climate. A variety of plant and animal life is typical with stands of old-growth Western Redcedar and Western Hemlock, a forest type which is rapidly declining outside of protected areas. The park's inland rainforest also has an isolated population of banana slugs which marks the eastern boundary of their distribution in North America.

I see it even on the National Parks documents I have here.


By adding "temperate" I think you get closer to the truth, but I still think it's a slightly extravagant claim. I believe there is inland old growth rain forest around Mt. LeConte and in Cades Cove in the Smokies, and that is temperate. Might find some examples elsewhere, depending on what you count as "inland." None here in Alaska, I'll grant you--ours is all coastal.

As for the East (some, but not all, of which is old growth):
Appalachian temperate rain forests of the eastern USA
Temperate rain forests in the eastern USA are limited to areas in the southern Appalachian Mountains where orographic precipitation causes weather systems coming from the west and from the Gulf of Mexico to drop more precipitation than in surrounding areas. The largest of these forest blocks are located in western North Carolina, northern Georgia, and far eastern Tennessee, largely in the Pisgah, Nantahala, Chattahoochee National Forests and nearby Gorges State Park. In addition, small areas in the highest elevations of the Great Smoky Mountains also receive substantial rainfall, with Clingmans Dome, for example, collecting about 2000 mm of precipitation per year. Although the highest summits of the Green Mountains of Vermont, the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and Mount Katahdin in Maine receive over 2000 mm of precipitation per year, some of these locations have alpine environments and whether or not temperate rain forests exist in these regions is subject to debate. It is possible for small blocks of temperate rainforest to exist along the slopes of these mountain ranges below the tree line where annual precipitation is sufficient for such forests to thrive.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temperate_rainforest#Global_distribution
Last edited by chugach mtn boy on Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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rasgoat

 
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by rasgoat » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:33 pm

mrchad9 wrote:
rasgoat wrote:
mrchad9 wrote:If you think 'it's all good' then you obviously have never lived in Houston.


Damn, I just mapquested Big Bend from your location, 9 1/2 hours is alot.

LOL!!!

But not my location! I lived there from 1998-2000. That was enough!


Thank goodness!!!

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James_W

 
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by James_W » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:35 pm

http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/revels ... tcul9.aspx

I doubt Parks Canada would lie about it.

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simonov

 
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by simonov » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:37 pm

Castlereagh wrote:Have we really been reduced to pointless pissing matches about whose backyards are better?


This is, after all, the interwebs.

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mrchad9

 
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by mrchad9 » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:45 pm

Catamount wrote:It is what it is, gents. No point arguing about the color of the sky ... it's still blue.

Not in Houston:

<img src="http://www.utexas.edu/research/ceer/texaqs/images/hazy_downtown_view.jpg" width="800px">

Image

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chugach mtn boy

 
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by chugach mtn boy » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:47 pm

James_W wrote:http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/revelstoke/natcul/natcul9.aspx

I doubt Parks Canada would lie about it.


:shock: Lord have mercy, they don't even limit it to old growth, they flat out claim they have the "world's only temperate inland rainforest." Being Canadian, they probably think everything south of 48 d 40 m is tropical :roll:

Oh well, there are a few other park systems in the Eastern US, Iran, Azerbaijan, etc who might disagree ...

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MoapaPk

 
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by MoapaPk » Thu Jul 22, 2010 12:10 am

James_W wrote: an isolated population of banana slugs which marks the eastern boundary of their distribution in North America.



You had me at banana slugs.

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