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Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2012 8:02 pm
by Alpinist
My friend and I rescued 41 Sierra Brookies (fingerlings) from a 3'x2'x6" shrinking pond in a dried up stream last week. Amazing that they had enough oxygen to survive with that many fish in such a small space. With no rain in sight, they surely would have died in a couple of days. We moved them 1 or 2 at a time to the nearby lake.

We couldn't see them well because they were hiding under an overhang in the riverbank. Plus, the water was murky from us stirring up the bottom. Have any idea how hard it is to catch a fish with cooking pot when you can't even see them? Let me tell you, they are slippery little buggers. It took us about 2 hours to fish them out with a cook pot and net that we made from the gear loft from our tent. It was a fun challenge though and it felt satisfying to do our good deed for the day!

Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2012 8:12 pm
by Tonka
Icarreau....? Icarreau...? He's tee'd one up for you.

Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2012 8:22 pm
by Alpinist
HaHa! I guess I did. Waiting....

Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2012 11:39 pm
by mountainsandsound
I have read quite a few studies about the Park Service actually taking fish out of alpine lakes, in the Sierras and in the North Cascades. Hard to believe but most of those gorgeous alpine lakes in the high country do not have native fish populations. In many cases, horse packers and the Park Service introduced them long ago to provide recreational fishing opportunities. There is strong evidence that the presence of the fish has endangered a frog species in the Sierra. The studies documenting the changes in the alpine ecosystem brought on by fish are fascinating, if you're into that sort of thing.

But yeah... rescuing little fish sucking in the last bit of nasty water over their gills is satisfying.

Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:21 am
by Gafoto
A lot of the alpine lakes have been gill netted. Upper Horton was done recently. Most of the lakes out of Onion Valley were also done and the frog populations have rebounded. I think the more popular fishing lakes will continue to stay stocked or at least not netted.

Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:36 am
by lcarreau
Alpinist wrote: Amazing that they had enough oxygen to survive ...



Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:36 am
by Kahuna
Gafoto wrote:A lot of the alpine lakes have been gill netted. Upper Horton was done recently. Most of the lakes out of Onion Valley were also done and the frog populations have rebounded. I think the more popular fishing lakes will continue to stay stocked or at least not netted.



Isn't that so intelligently human .... terminate "KILL" thousands of several species in order to save one.

Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:47 am
by lcarreau
Alpinist wrote:We couldn't see them well because they were hiding under an overhang in the riverbank. Plus, the water was murky from us stirring up the bottom. Have any idea how hard it is to catch a fish ......."


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Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 4:08 am
by lcarreau
A5RP wrote:
Isn't that so intelligently human ....


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Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2012 12:52 am
by Skateboards2Scrapers
FAIL USE OF A MEME

Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2012 3:13 am
by lcarreau
FAIL ......

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Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2012 5:26 pm
by TimB
Not exactly on topic here, but the only Golden Trout I have ever caught have been in the Eastern Sierras. Those darn things looked like they could have been from a marine reef, they had such bright colors.
:cool:

Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2012 10:34 pm
by Vitaliy M.
TimB wrote:Not exactly on topic here, but the only Golden Trout I have ever caught have been in the Eastern Sierras. Those darn things looked like they could have been from a marine reef, they had such bright colors.
:cool:


That was surprising to me too. Trout in Eastern Sierra does look exotic compared to ones I caught in lakes around bay area.

Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2012 2:54 am
by Gafoto
A5RP wrote:
Gafoto wrote:A lot of the alpine lakes have been gill netted. Upper Horton was done recently. Most of the lakes out of Onion Valley were also done and the frog populations have rebounded. I think the more popular fishing lakes will continue to stay stocked or at least not netted.



Isn't that so intelligently human .... terminate "KILL" thousands of several species in order to save one.

Well, it's more mistake correction than anything. People purposely introduced a species into the lakes and now we're taking it back out. I agree it's a little odd to be simultaneously gill netting some lakes and stocking others.

Re: Sierra trout rescue operation

PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2012 4:35 am
by Alpinist
The Brookies in the Emigrant Wilderness have some beautiful color!

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