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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 2:42 pm
by Alpinist
The middle of Lake Michigan. It's very much like an ocean. You can't see the shoreline on either side from the middle of the lake unless it is very clear.

PostPosted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 6:57 am
by Klenke
The unanswerable way to pose the question is:
What is the largest diameter circle that can be drawn on the map (of a state, any state, the nation, or even the world) inside of which no human as ever set foot? Only God knows that one.

In Washington, for example, what is the diameter of that circle. Is it a quarter-mile across? Less? More?

And where is that circle? Is it a place in the Pickets, as Excitable Boy mentioned? More likely, it would be a place at the head of Baker River.

Hmmmm....

PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 7:23 pm
by Dan Shorb
Klenke wrote: the head of Baker River.

Hmmmm....


That is hard to get to. A few friends did a trip up there going as few as .3 miles/day through devil's club.

What about in Idaho? Frank church is pretty big isn't it?

I like the tid bit about CA's southrn sierra Near Tehiphite dome.

What about New Mexico?

Or, Alaska?

PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 7:34 pm
by Joseph Bullough
In terms of distance from the nearest road, the southeast corner of Yellowstone National Park is often quoted as the most remote spot in the lower 48 states - roughly 30 miles from the nearest road.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 8:08 pm
by mstender
Joseph Bullough wrote:In terms of distance from the nearest road, the southeast corner of Yellowstone National Park is often quoted as the most remote spot in the lower 48 states - roughly 30 miles from the nearest road.


What is the definition of "road" in this context? Does it have to be a paved road, or graded dirt road or can it be an unmaintained dirt road, which would require 4WD?
There have to be some places in NV that are pretty remote.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 8:09 pm
by John Duffield
nartreb wrote:That's not counting islands - either the southern tip of Shooters Island south of cape cod, or Graves Island outside Boston Harbor, would win if islands are counted - each very roughly five miles from any road - , unless there's a further tiny island I don't know about. (The islands in the Quabbin mentioned above are in a different category since that lake is artificial.)


This was exactly where my thoughts turned when I saw the thread title. Lots of places get traffic simply because people go through them on their way somewhere else. You get on an island and time basically stops. Lots of them are like the old days in many ways. The price of admission is elevated. You need to fly or to boat.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 8:33 pm
by Hotoven
I would have to say The Allegheny National Forest. There's only a hand full of major roads that go into it. This is in North Western PA.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 8:59 pm
by dwhike
For Michigan it's easy...Isle Royale though the lodge at Rock Harbor kinda ruins it...on the mainland I'd have to say somewhere deep in the Huron Mountains northwest of Marquette...lots of logging roads but don't expect a trucker to stop and help if you get lost!

PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 11:49 pm
by Lolli
Sarek.

PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 12:17 am
by mrh
Not sure what the remotest part of Idaho is. After a little fiddling around I found lower Moose Creek, which is the main tributary to the Selway River in the Selway Bitterroot Wilderness is the center of a roadless area approximately 32 x 43 miles. Considering that some of the limiting roads that extend into the area are really goat trails that require 2 or 3 hours of rugged driving with high clearance 4wd, its probably more remote than it sounds.

However, I suspect the north end of the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, which is separated by the above by just one thread of a road, may be more remote. I don't think there is a road between the Montana road north of the Salmon River and far to the south across the river and Chamberlain Basin well into the Middle Fork Basin. I don't have time to research it, but I suspect its a bigger area. Maybe someone more familiar with that area can say.

But the most remote area could well be in the Owyhees in the far SW part of the state. Again I don't care to look it up. But the remotest place in the U.S. outside of Alaska (and the middle of Lake Superior if counting water) is almost certainly in the American Outback, which is the vast empty country where SW Idaho, SE Oregon and northern NV meet.

PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 12:19 am
by Dan Shorb
Sierra Ledge Rat wrote:Most remote?

The state capitol. They're so far out of touch that it's not funny.


Is that near the DMV, cause I spent 16 hours just trying to get to part of it?

PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 12:32 am
by mrh
OK, I played with the Selway Bitterroot a little more. If one runs a NNE to SSW line roughly on the Bitterroot axis (Montana - Idaho border) from near Lolo Peak to the road east of Magruder Ranger Station, 70 miles of roadless ground is crossed. The width of this area varies from 5 to 45 miles with most of it being 20 to 40 miles. Impressive, but I still think its in 2nd or 3rd place in Idaho and it also extends into Montana in several places.

PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 1:22 am
by calebEOC
mrh wrote:Not sure what the remotest part of Idaho is. After a little fiddling around I found lower Moose Creek, which is the main tributary to the Selway River in the Selway Bitterroot Wilderness is the center of a roadless area approximately 32 x 43 miles. Considering that some of the limiting roads that extend into the area are really goat trails that require 2 or 3 hours of rugged driving with high clearance 4wd, its probably more remote than it sounds.

However, I suspect the north end of the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, which is separated by the above by just one thread of a road, may be more remote. I don't think there is a road between the Montana road north of the Salmon River and far to the south across the river and Chamberlain Basin well into the Middle Fork Basin. I don't have time to research it, but I suspect its a bigger area. Maybe someone more familiar with that area can say.

But the most remote area could well be in the Owyhees in the far SW part of the state. Again I don't care to look it up. But the remotest place in the U.S. outside of Alaska (and the middle of Lake Superior if counting water) is almost certainly in the American Outback, which is the vast empty country where SW Idaho, SE Oregon and northern NV meet.


I've looked at this outback area in my Benchmark Oregon Atlas numerous times and am just astounded with the lack of name recognition in this area. There is not a single hill, town, or even ranch in the far SE corner I have ever read about or seen anything of on TV, one of these days I'm going to have to see this spot.

PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 1:29 am
by Smoove910
In the lower 48, Frank Church Wilderness here in Idaho, hands down. But that certainly doesn't mean any of you are invited. :D

PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 3:18 pm
by Dan Shorb
Smoove910 wrote:In the lower 48, Frank Church Wilderness here in Idaho, hands down. But that certainly doesn't mean any of you are invited. :D


I built trails up there one summer, and haven't been back... that is remote.


Things get even more remote (Rarely seen/no human evidence) when you start thinking 3D:

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