Winter climbing/camping when I run very warm (body temp)

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earlyblurd

 
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Winter climbing/camping when I run very warm (body temp)

by earlyblurd » Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:30 pm

Hey everyone,
I’m new to the world of winter and high-altitude camping. I’ve been working diligently to put together gear for myself so I can go out in inclement, negative degree temperatures and remain safe. In my future, I would like to prepare myself for winter 14er ascents.

I’m running into what some may call a personal hang-up that I need some advice to get over…

Personally, I run very warm. As in— body temperature wise. I’ve found that as 120 lb female, I generate the heat of a person 3x my size. People typically end up wearing my jackets when out on a winter hike.

This is great when I’m out in the cold and not moving around too much, but also terribly dangerous as I have to constantly be considerate of sweating and soaking my clothing during exertion.

Should I assume that this is how it will be for me when I go out to do these climbs and perhaps back-down on temperature ratings of things such as sleeping bags and jackets? Or should I ignore the furnace that is my body and prepare as though I were the average person, getting a -25 F sleeping bag and a huge, 800 fill, puffy jacket.

Obviously this all might just come down to trial and error.

But – in general – would anyone have any gear advice for someone who has a higher threshold for the cold? Does this bless me with the ability to perhaps spend less money on certain items? Or am I just naïve to my potential needs higher up? I am terrified of running into sweating and would like if at all possible to avoid over packing or buying.

Thanks for your help!

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mrchad9

 
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Re: Winter climbing/camping when I run very warm (body temp)

by mrchad9 » Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:45 pm

Yes... you should take less or lighter clothing and sleeping bag. If sweat is pouring out of you then you have too much. Take the size sleeping bag that makes you comfortable... not one that makes you too hot.

Depending on the extent to which you feel so hot just when you are moving versus when at rest you may need some layers, but they should be in line with what makes you comfortable.

Sometimes I use a 32 degree bag (though I often sleep in all my layers... this lets me keep the lighter bag but save weight) while people I am climbing with are using a 0 or even -20 degree bag (probably not wearing all layers though). So I save 2-3 pounds immediately just by having a lighter bag... and still comfortable.

Do not punish yourself by copying others' gear... take what is appropriate for you.

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earlyblurd

 
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Re: Winter climbing/camping when I run very warm (body temp)

by earlyblurd » Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:54 pm

mrchad9 wrote:Do not punish yourself by copying others' gear... take what is appropriate for you.


Exactly what I needed to hear. I've been a bit obsessive with making the right choices, but can go with my gut (literally) on a few things in the way of comfort.

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ExcitableBoy

 
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Re: Winter climbing/camping when I run very warm (body temp)

by ExcitableBoy » Wed Feb 21, 2018 6:34 pm

I run very hot, pathologically so according to my physician, so I feel your pain.

First off, you should dress just warm enough to stay warm when you are moving. When you stop you put on your belay jacket. How many layers and insulation you need to stay just barely warm enough while moving is for you to determine.

As for sleeping bags, I use a +15 degree WM Apache Super Dryloft in the winter on peaks as big as Rainier and in the spring for Alaska Range climbs. (Not Denali, used a warmer bag). I use this bag in the shoulder seasons and winter in the Cascades. I adjust for differing temperatures by wearing fewer or more clothes.

You should select the bag so it will keep you warm down to the expected temperatures with all your clothes on and your belay jacket draped over the top.

For winter 14ers in Colorado, I would use my +15 degree bag. You can get very light, compressible, 850 down, baffled parkas that have a large comfort range, being warm enough for Colorado and Denali, depending on whatever else you are wearing. The Patagonia Fitz Roy and OR Maestro are two examples I have owned and recommend.


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