Sequoia with human subjects...

Sequoia with human subjects and a screen of dogwood branches.

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Velebit

Velebit - Jan 4, 2004 9:14 pm - Voted 10/10

Always wondered...

...how it must feel to stand below sequoia tree and look up. I guess walking through their forest makes us really feel small, fascinating.

Klenke

Klenke - Jan 4, 2004 10:59 pm - Voted 10/10

Re: Always wondered...

Do you not have big trees like this in Europe?

I did a hike a few weeks back. The route passed through a formerly logged area from maybe 100 years ago. We passed at least a dozen cedar stumps that were at least as big around as the tree pictured here. It made me want to cry. Such is/was the destruction of our old growth forest in Washington. There's not much left now.

desainme

desainme - Jan 4, 2004 11:12 pm - Hasn't voted

Re: Always wondered...

The white pine that I sent in today was not so well displayed-it ws however an old tree that had escaped earlier cuttings. The first act at Dartmouth College was to cut down a 220 foot white pine, A white pine in western maine as late as the 1920's was measured at 225 feet tall.. Thoreua recounts seeing stumps on the Penobscot that could accomodate a team of oxen and a politician boasting of the virtues of reducing such a tree to matchsticks by the New England Match Co.

Velebit

Velebit - Jan 5, 2004 5:49 am - Voted 10/10

Re: Always wondered...

There are some high and massive trees in Europe but nothing like sequoia. We always admired them. It is really a tragedy they devastated such beautiful forests. Well, who is more stupid than man! Also I didn’t know that pine can be 220 feet tall, as Mark mentioned. Here, in Croatia biggest trees are plane-tree and lime-tree. Their trunks and crowns are really huge, especially of plane-tree, whose crown can be even wider than it is high. I saw trunks of lime-tree which are half wide as of that sequoia on this picture. That is huge for Europe. Both trees are generally not higher than 40m (around 125feet). On mountains highest are spruce trees. In some protected valleys of Velebit and Gorski Kotar region they reach also around 40m (around 125feet), maybe even little bit above that. Their trunks are like of that pine which Mark posted. In the Alps is similar, spruce is highest. Maybe those forests in Finland have some higher specimens.

RayMondo

RayMondo - Oct 20, 2009 2:15 pm - Hasn't voted

Re: Always wondered...

Do not despair. I have begun to introduce the Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) to Somerset, England. There was I in a US gift shop in 1994 and a Sequoia stood in a pack and staring at me. It is now 30ft tall with a 3ft base and growing strong at the end of the garden. Within another 10 years I expect to make the big ascent!

I have also propagated cuttings and am slowly distributing them to private parkland. I hope to leave the legacy of El Cap-sequoia giganteum through the valley here.

The tallest tree in the UK stands in Dunster, just down the road to where I live.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/somerset/7975130.stm

Klenke

Klenke - Oct 21, 2009 2:46 pm - Voted 10/10

Re: Always wondered...

Thanks for the link, Ray. The Doug-Fir is the most common evergreen in Washington State. I note that the article wrongly doesn't hyphenate Douglas-Fir. It's not a true fir, hence the need for a hyphen.

Regarding your introduction of the Sequoia to the UK, I can only refer you to the Giant Hogweed.

RayMondo

RayMondo - Oct 21, 2009 7:04 pm - Hasn't voted

The Douglas-fir and Sequoias

No panic, the Sequoias had been native to the UK millions of years ago, until the ice sheets came. There are now many across the country, though self-propagtion is less likely as we do not have many forest fires which clear the ground and enable the cone seed to germinate. So a little help is needed.
http://www.redwoodworld.co.uk/native.htm

http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761565105/Sequoyah_(Native_American_leader).html
Cheers, Ray

wuedesau

wuedesau - May 6, 2004 10:26 am - Voted 10/10

Monster

of a tree. Unfortunately there are not many left.

RayMondo

RayMondo - Oct 20, 2009 2:17 pm - Hasn't voted

Re: Monster

You'll be pleased to read my reply above.

RayMondo

RayMondo - Oct 21, 2009 7:17 pm - Hasn't voted

Re: Monster

Bad old days
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Giant_sequoia_exhibitionism.jpg

Getting better - natural fires help:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequoiadendron

Romuald Kosina

Romuald Kosina - Mar 13, 2006 5:52 pm - Voted 10/10

An...

An exciting tree!!!

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