The Effort Scale of Highpointing the Fifty US States

The Effort Scale of Highpointing the Fifty US States

Page Type Page Type: Article
Activities Activities: Hiking, Mountaineering

Brief History of Highpointing

Highpointing is the pursuit of reaching the highest elevation within a specified area. The formalization of highpointing each of the 50 US states is credited to the late Jack Longacre when back in 1986 he took notice of people mentioning their highpoint achievement in log books at the top of various summits. As a result, he went on to form the Highpointers Club. Jack became the seventh person to achieve standing on the summits of all 50 US states, and as of year-end 2018 only about 300 more people had followed suit.

The US state highpoints range from landmarks as low as 345 feet to mountains as tall as 20,320 feet. Some highpoints can be driven to, requiring little or no walking effort, whereas others take skilled mountain climbers’ days or even weeks to scale on foot.

Map of the USAMap of the USA, showing each of the fifty states.

Not a One to One Comparison

Too often people incorrectly equate the effort of reaching one highpoint to that of reaching another; unconsciously assuming that since all are highpoints all amount to equal effort. However, with the highpoints having such a wide range of geographical makeup there are many factors which influence their individual difficulty.

Traits such as prominence, isolation, type of terrain, vertical gain, weather, distance from a road, and natural dangers all influence the struggle (or lack of struggle) of reaching a highpoint. Likewise factors such as personal fitness, experience level, sensitivity to altitude, preparation, risk tolerance, time available, gear required, team size/dynamics, and mental clarity, just to name a few, also influence difficulty.  As such difficulty/effort rankings tend to be (and rightly so) mostly a matter of opinion, and personal experience.

One highpointer might avoid walking when a driving option is available, use guides to lead him up the most challenging summits, and/or only venture out in fair weather. Whereas another might tackle highpoints solo or only during winter months, and avoid driving in favor of hiking.

Adding to the confusion, the Highpointers Club offers no hard and fast rules for obtaining a highpoint indorsing “any route to the top” be it by horse, automobile, foot, helicopter, or what have you – leaving the means of ascent to personal choice.

Furthermore, one might also incorrectly assume that a list of the 50 US state highpoints ordered by elevation would suffice as a list of difficulty. Unfortunately, that too falls short. For example, Mt Marcy of New York stands shorter than Nebraska’s Panorama Point with the latter being nothing more than a spot on a prairie requiring no uphill walking and the former being a mountain rising over 3000 feet from the trailhead.

What is Difficulty?

The dictionary defines difficulty as a thing that is hard to accomplish, and effort as strenuous physical exertion. For purposes of this article, and the Effort Scale, difficulty and effort should be considered alternative words.

For some the difficulty of highpointing might be finding the time to pursue the undertaking, or coming up with the money needed. For others it might be very challenging to plan the logistics of highpointing trips. Others might have no interest in visiting landmarks, and their challenge is to find the motivation to do so.

It is impossible to know and to measure all the factors that make a challenge difficult. Thus, for the 50 US state highpoint challenge the Effort Scale considers only measurable and probable variables which when combined result in level of effort.

Effort Scale Explained

The goal of the Effort Scale is to compare how much human-only effort is needed to reach one highpoint, as opposed to another, under one’s own foot-power exclusively. In other words, it is a measure of the walking, hiking, and/or climbing effort from the point where one steps out of the automobile (or plane), and makes his way, under solely his own power, to the highpoint and back down.

The scale does not try to account for all the various routes or means that lead to a highpoint; nor all the things that might happen en route. Rather it derives its measurements based on the least technical standard route, completed within a typical timeframe, with proper acclimation, and under probable average weather.  Although the author does not recommend driving to highpoints, the least technical standard route is always the driveable route when such an option exists, meaning the highpoint receives an effort score of 0.

The Effort Scale assigns effort points to each highpoint, with these points being a combination of total hiking mileage, vertical gain, terrain difficulty, nights required, and expected cold weather days. All other factors are exogenous to its model, and for the sake of simplicity must be ignored. Points are totaled for each highpoint, and then convert to a 0 through 1000 scale.

With a magnitude of effort number assigned to each highpoint the Effort Scale is also able to record the percent of physical effort each peak contributes to the whole task of reaching each of the 50 US state highpoints.

Effort Scale Methodology

As the baseline, the Effort Scale assigns one point to each round-trip hiking mile. Hiking distances less than 500 feet are considered insignificant and have been rounded to 0 miles; likewise vertical gains under 20 feet are truncated to 0 feet.

The Effort Scale equates vertical gain to round-trip distance by multiplying vertical gain, in miles, by a difficulty factor and adding that to the baseline. The vertical gain used is an estimate of all elevation gain, including gain related to rising and falling terrain.

The scale considers it to be 15 times more difficult to climb 1 mile then to walk 1 mile, and arrives at this number by comparing the distance a reasonably fit person can walk in an hour to the distance the same person can climb in an hour. It is estimated that 3 miles can be walked in 1 hour, and likewise 1000 vertical feet (0.189394 miles) can be climbed in one hour. Truncating the ratio of 3/0.189394, the Effort Scale arrives at the multiplier of 15. As such the Effort Scale awards 1 point for each 352 feet of gain. Decimal places are carried through to the one and only final rounding.

To the round-trip distance and vertical gain points the scale next accounts for terrain difficulty by adding 6 points if a highpoint involves climbing with the use of both hands and feet, but not the protection of a rope, and 12 points if a highpoint involves roped rock climbing or roped glacier travel. Denali, Gannett Peak, Mount Hood, and Mount Rainier each earn 12 terrain points as they warrant roped glacier travel. Likewise, Granite Peak also earns 12 terrain points as it necessitates roped rock climbing. While Borah Peak earns 6 terrain points as it involves unroped scrambling using both hands and feet.

Next 1 point for each night required is added in. Mount Rainier, Granite Peak, and Kings Peak each earn 2 night points as a typical trip to their respective summits involve staying over for two nights. Mount Whitney earns 1 night point, Gannett Peak 3, and Denali 17.

As a means of accounting for weather, double points are awarded for each day where afternoon temperature can be expected to remain near or below the freezing point. For example, the average summer month temperatures on the summit of Rainier are close to the 32 F freezing point. As such a 3-day trip up Rainier earns 2 weather points for the summit day when the temperature likely will be at or below freezing. On Denali, everyday can remain below freezing so an 18-day trip earns 36 weather points. None of the other highpoints qualify for weather points.

Once the points, and any fractions thereof, are summed the results are rounded and then normalized to a 1 - 1000 scale, to allow easy comparisons.

The equation is as follows:  Effort Score = 1000[mileage + 15(vertical distance in miles) + difficulty + nights + 2(temperature)] / [Maximum Points^]. 

^Maximum points are the total raw points of the highpoint with the most points before conversion to the 0-1000 scale.  The table below does not list the raw points.  Raw points can be calculated as explained above, or one can contact the author if interested in obtaining the raw points.

Table 1: The Effort Scale of US state Highpoint Difficulty

The table below is ordered by the most physically demanding (highest effort/difficulty) down to the least demanding as determined by the Effort Scale. If one highpoint has the same Effort Scale number as another, the highpoints are ordered alphabetically by US state name – in which case the reader may want to compare vertical gain and round-trip miles as a means of breaking a tie. Although not part of the Effort Scale model, elevation numbers are listed for interest sake and to alert climbers that acclimation techniques, for mountains over 7,500 feet, might need to be part of their climbing preparations.

As previously stated the Effort Scale is based on the least technical standard route which is always the driveable route when such an option exists.  Some will find it helpful to see the "0" Effort Scale number and know the highpoint can be driven to within 250 feet and will entail 20 feet (or less) of elevation gain to reach from the parking area.

Effort Scale Highpoint Vertical Gain (ft) Round-Trip (miles)^^
1000
(21.96%)
Alaska - Denali (M)
20,320 ft
19000* 39**
506
(11.11%)
Wyoming - Gannett Peak (M)
13,804 ft
8650 40.4
368
(8.08%)
Montana - Granite Peak (M)
12,799 ft
7700 22.2
366
(8.04%)
Washington - Mount Rainier (M)
14,411 ft
9100 16
291
(6.39%)
Utah - Kings Peak (M)
13,528 ft
5350 28.8
263
(5.78%)
California - Mount Whitney (M)
14,497 ft
6750 21.4
222
(4.88%)
Oregon - Mount Hood (M)
11,239 ft
5300 8
181
(3.98%)
Idaho - Borah Peak (M)
12,662 ft
5550 6.8
151
(3.32%)
New York - Mount Marcy (M)
5,344 ft
3200 14.8
147
(3.23%)
Colorado - Mount Elbert (M)
14,433 ft
5000 9
141
(3.10%)
Maine - Katahdin (M)
5,268 ft
4200 10.4
126
(2.77%)
Nevada - Boundary Peak (M)
13,140 ft
4400 7.4
120
(2.64%)
Arizona - Humphreys Peak (M)
12,633 ft
3500 9
106
(2.33%)
Texas - Guadalupe Peak (M)
8,749 ft
2950 8.4
98
(2.15%)
New Mexico - Wheeler Peak (M)
13,161 ft
3250 6.2
81
(1.78%)
Virginia - Mount Rogers (M)
5,729 ft
1500 8.6
68
(1.49%)
Oklahoma - Black Mesa (H)
4,973 ft
775 8.6
64
(1.41%)
South Dakota - Black Elk Peak (M)
7,242 ft
1500 5.8
55
(1.21%)
Minnesota - Eagle Mountain (M)
2,301 ft
600 7
31
(0.68%)
Connecticut - Mount Frissell-South Slope (M)
2,380 ft
450 3.6
29
(0.64%)
North Dakota - White Butte (H)
3,506 ft
400 3.4
28
(0.61%)
Vermont - Mount Mansfield (M)
4,393 ft
550 2.8
27
(0.59%)
Maryland - Backbone Mountain (M)
3,360 ft
750 2.2
21
(0.46%)
Illinois - Charles Mound (H)
1,235 ft
275 2.5
14
(0.31%)
Louisiana - Driskill Mountain (H)
535 ft
150 1.8
12
(0.26%)
Tennessee - Clingmans Dome (M)
6,643 ft
330 1
10
(0.22%)
Arkansas - Magazine Mountain (M)
2,753 ft
225 1
7
(0.15%)
Hawaii - Mauna Kea (M)
13,796 ft
230 0.4
5
(0.11%)
Wisconsin - Timms Hill (H)
1,951 ft
120 0.4
3
(0.07%)
Missouri - Taum Sauk Mountain (M)
1,772 ft
30 0.4
3
(0.07%)
North Carolina - Mount Mitchell (M)
6,684 ft
100 0.2
2
(0.04%)
New Jersey - High Point (H)
1,803 ft
40 0.2
2
(0.04%)
South Carolina - Sassafras Mountain (M)
3,553 ft
50 0.15
2
(0.04%)
West Virginia - Spruce Knob (M)
4,863 ft
20 0.3
1
(0.02%)
Kentucky - Black Mountain (M)
4,139 ft
0 0.1***
1
(0.02%)
Massachusetts - Mount Greylock (M)
3,491 ft
20 0.1
1
(0.02%)
Rhode Island - Jerimoth Hill (L)
812 ft
0 0.2
0 Alabama - Cheaha Mountain (M)
2,407 ft
0 0
0 Delaware - Ebright Azimuth (L)
448 ft
0 0
0 Florida - Britton Hill (L)
345 ft
0 0
0 Georgia - Brasstown Bald (M)
4,784 ft
0 0****
0 Indiana - Hoosier Hill (L)
1,257 ft
0 0
0 Iowa - Hawkeye Point (L)
1,670 ft
0 0
0 Kansas - Mount Sunflower (L)
4,039 ft
0 0
0 Michigan - Mount Arvon (H)
1,979 ft
0 0
0 Mississippi - Woodall Mountain (H)
806 ft
0 0
0 Nebraska - Panorama Point (L)
5,424 ft
0 0
0 New Hampshire - Mount Washington (M)
6,288 ft
20 0
0 Ohio - Campbell Hill (H)
1,550 ft
0 0
0 Pennsylvania - Mount Davis (H)
3,213 ft
0 0

(x.yz%) = Percent of Total Difficulty, M = Mountain, H = Hill, L = Landmark

^^ Round-trip distances listed are the most recent available as of November 2019.  Very rarely, yet possible, routes can have a change of starting point, meaning some of the numbers listed in the Effort Scale are subject to change.

* In the case of Denali, the ascent distance doesn’t equal the descent distance because climbers typically repeat sections of the climb for acclimation purposes and in the process of moving up supplies. The West Buttress route from base camp to the summit of Denali is 16.75 miles, but with repeated sections it becomes closer to 22.25 miles on the ascent resulting in a round-trip distance of 39 miles.

** The elevation difference between Denali’s base camp (of the West Buttress Route) and the summit is 13,120 feet. However, with sections being repeated, as explained above, the elevation gain of Denali is listed as 19,000 ft.

*** Black Mountain Ridge road is not maintained, and as such an automobile with decent clearance is advised if attempting to drive to the highpoint of Kentucy.

**** A shuttle bus service is provided from the parking lot to the highpoint of Georgia.

Table 2:  The Effort Scale Variation

Many are interested in a variation of the Effort Scale in which routes other than the standard routes are used to reach the highpoint. Since many routes exist for every highpoint it would not be feasible to attempt to account for all of them. However, for interest, the author has listed the routes he used in lieu of the standard driving option for five of the highpoints. The five are highlighted below with a blue background and white text.

Notice how the Effort Scale numbers stay the same for all the highpoints remaining on the standard route. The other five, of course, have a new bigger Effort Scale number. However, because the five non-standard route highpoints require more effort, the effort percentage (listed under each Effort Scale number) changes for most of the other highpoints, as total percentage cannot add up to more than 100%. When the effort percentage of one highpoint changes, one or more others will also change.

Effort Scale Highpoint Vertical Gain (ft) Round-Trip (miles)^^
1000
(20.86%)
Alaska - Denali (M)
20,320 ft
19000* 39**
506
(10.55%)
Wyoming - Gannett Peak (M)
13,804 ft
8650 40.4
368
(7.68%)
Montana - Granite Peak (M)
12,799 ft
7700 22.2
366
(7.63%)
Washington - Mount Rainier (M)
14,411 ft
9100 16
291
(6.07%)
Utah - Kings Peak (M)
13,528 ft
5350 28.8
263
(5.49%)
California - Mount Whitney (M)
14,497 ft
6750 21.4
222
(4.63%)
Oregon - Mount Hood (M)
11,239 ft
5300 8
181
(3.78%)
Idaho - Borah Peak (M)
12,662 ft
5550 6.8
151
(3.15%)
New York - Mount Marcy (M)
5,344 ft
3200 14.8
147
(3.07%)
Colorado - Mount Elbert (M)
14,433 ft
5000 9
141
(2.94%)
Maine - Katahdin (M)
5,268 ft
4200 10.4
129
(2.69%)
New Hampshire - Mount Washington (M) via Tuckerman Ravine
6,288 ft
4300 8.2
126
(2.63%)
Nevada - Boundary Peak (M)
13,140 ft
4400 7.4
120
(2.63%)
Arizona - Humphreys Peak (M)
12,633 ft
3500 9
106
(2.21%)
Texas - Guadalupe Peak (M)
8,749 ft
2950 8.4
98
(2.04%)
New Mexico - Wheeler Peak (M)
13,161 ft
3250 6.2
81
(1.69%)
Virginia - Mount Rogers (M)
5,729 ft
1500 8.6
79
(1.65%)
Vermont - Mount Mansfield (M) via Long Trail
4,393 ft
2800 4.6
68
(1.42%)
Oklahoma - Black Mesa (H)
4,973 ft
775 8.6
64
(1.34%)
South Dakota - Black Elk Peak (M)
7,242 ft
1500 5.8
55
(1.15%)
Minnesota - Eagle Mountain (M)
2,301 ft
600 7
35
(0.73%)
North Carolina - Mount Mitchell (M) via Old Mitchell Trail
6,684 ft
700 3.6
31
(0.65%)
Connecticut - Mount Frissell-South Slope (M)
2,380 ft
450 3.6
29
(0.60%)
North Dakota - White Butte (H)
3,506 ft
400 3.4
27
(0.56%)
Maryland - Backbone Mountain (M)
3,360 ft
750 2.2
21
(0.44%)
Illinois - Charles Mound (H)
1,235 ft
275 2.5
15
(0.31%)
Georgia - Brasstown Bald (M) from the main parking lot (no shuttle)
4,784 ft
400 1.2
15
(0.31%)
Massachusetts - Mount Greylock (M) via AT from Intersection of Rockwell Rd and Summit Rd
3,491 ft
320 1.5
14
(0.29%)
Louisiana - Driskill Mountain (H)
535 ft
150 1.8
12
(0.25%)
Tennessee - Clingmans Dome (M)
6,643 ft
330 1
10
(0.21%)
Arkansas - Magazine Mountain (M)
2,753 ft
225 1
7
(0.15%)
Hawaii - Mauna Kea (M)
13,796 ft
230 0.4
5
(0.10%)
Wisconsin - Timms Hill (H)
1,951 ft
120 0.4
3
(0.06%)
Missouri - Taum Sauk Mountain (M)
1,772 ft
30 0.4
2
(0.04%)
New Jersey - High Point (H)
1,803 ft
40 0.2
2
(0.04%)
South Carolina - Sassafras Mountain (M)
3,553 ft
50 0.15
2
(0.04%)
West Virginia - Spruce Knob (M)
4,863 ft
20 0.3
1
(0.02%)
Kentucky - Black Mountain (M)
4,139 ft
0 0.1***
1
(0.02%)
Rhode Island - Jerimoth Hill (L)
812 ft
0 0.2
0 Alabama - Cheaha Mountain (M)
2,407 ft
0 0
0 Delaware - Ebright Azimuth (L)
448 ft
0 0
0 Florida - Britton Hill (L)
345 ft
0 0
0 Indiana - Hoosier Hill (L)
1,257 ft
0 0
0 Iowa - Hawkeye Point (L)
1,670 ft
0 0
0 Kansas - Mount Sunflower (L)
4,039 ft
0 0
0 Michigan - Mount Arvon (H)
1,979 ft
0 0
0 Mississippi - Woodall Mountain (H)
806 ft
0 0
0 Nebraska - Panorama Point (L)
5,424 ft
0 0
0 Ohio - Campbell Hill (H)
1,550 ft
0 0
0 Pennsylvania - Mount Davis (H)
3,213 ft
0 0

Conclusions

The Effort Scale reflects the Pareto Principle which states that for most tasks roughly 80% of the results come from 20% of the effort. According to the Effort Scale reaching 39 of the 50 highpoints (aka 78%) requires only 20.14% of the effort. The remaining 11 highpoints (aka remaining 22%) requires 79.86% of the effort.

The Effort Scale classifies highpoints as mountains, hills, and landmarks. 33 of the 50 are labeled as mountains and they require 96.93% of the effort. Another 10 are deemed hills requiring 3.05% of the effort. The remaining 7 are branded as landmarks requiring only 0.02% of the physical effort.

Denali has a score basically twice as large as any of the other mountains, plainly showing it requires twice as much effort to climb than its next counterpart. In fact, it requires the next two highest ranking mountains plus one other to come close to its score – meaning one would need to climb Gannett, Granite, and at least one more highpoint to compare to the effort of climbing Denali.

The average effort score is 91 (73 without Denali), whereas the highest 10 have an average of 350 (264 without Denali).

There really is no comparison between reaching a drive-up landmark and that of climbing a mountain, and the Effort Scale reflects this. If one divides the score of any mountain, for instance Mount Elbert of Colorado by the score of any of the zero ranked landmarks, such as Ebright Azimuth of Delaware, the result is mathematically undefined telling us there is no comparison. Whereas if one divides the score of Mount Elbert by the score of West Virginia’s Spruce Knob (for example) he learns that Mount Elbert requires 73.5 times more effort to summit.

For any combination of highpoints, summing the percentage number listed below their Effort Scores of Table 1, reveals the proportion of effort those highpoints jointly contribute to the total effort of ascending all. For example, 3.10% for Katahdin plus 2.33% for Guadalupe Peak plus 0.11% for Timms Hill informs us that those three combined contribute 5.54% to the total effort of reaching the highest spot in every US state.

About the Author


The Author

The author’s highpointing calling reaches back to May 2001 when he and two friends, having never heard of highpointing, drove to the top North Carolina’s Mount Mitchell. By the fall of that same year he tagged a second highpoint without yet having a goal to reach all fifty. Over the next eight years he completed another six, followed by another seven between 2010 and his 2014 climb of Denali. Following Denali he tagged another four, and then went into highpointing hibernation for over four years. August 2019 his highpointing desire returned and over the next couple of months he increased his highpoint count to twenty-nine.

Recognizing his remaining twenty-one highpoints seem less physically severe, the author began to wonder what percent of the total physical effort he had remaining. As such he developed the Effort Scale. Although his remaining highpoints account for less than 4.0% of the overall physical effort he knows they will not come without other types of struggles. He is not holding himself to it, but he hopes to complete all fifty within a twenty-year timeframe before June 2021.



Comments

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scramblingbadger

scramblingbadger - Nov 15, 2019 4:19 pm - Voted 10/10

Very Interesting Read

As someone who has almost no interest in highpointing, I still found this a very interesting and worthwhile read. I suppose one of the things that kind of put me off about highpointing was living in Nebraska for several years. There are some very beautiful and challenging scrambles on ranked summits in the Pine Ridge and the Wildcat Hills. Yet, these are often ignored by many that would prefer the drab and unchallenging highpoint of Nebraska to be of greater value.

I suppose highpointers would heartily disagree with me, but summits at the higher end of the Effort Scale seem worthwhile and memorable, while the stuff at the other end of the scale seems tedious. However, as the old saying goes, "to each his own". If this is where your interest is, more power to you. Thanks for posting this.

vanman798

vanman798 - Nov 15, 2019 6:49 pm - Hasn't voted

Re: Very Interesting Read

Thanks for taking the time to read it! I'm grateful for your comment. I mention in the article that for some the difficulty of highpointing is finding the motivation to visit landmarks (and we might add "just to check a box"). I suppose that is why I have done all the more difficult one first. I also have reasoned that, if necessary, I can save the landmarks and drive ups for my golden years. However this year I have visited a lot of less challenging highpoints and I have been very pleased with how much I enjoyed them. This endeavor is also an excuse to get out on vacations and to see new places, and so it's not just about climbing mountains (as many highpoints aren't mountains). Of course, yes "each to his own". Have a great evening!!!

Vid Pogachnik

Vid Pogachnik - Nov 16, 2019 1:48 am - Voted 10/10

Very interesting article!

I like how it combines altitude gain and distance. The scale is, of course, US oriented, so It would be great to think how to make it global. I wouldn't go for a Himalayan summit, representing max point, but would try to find something more universal. Our ancestors were as a measure of effort simply using the number of hours needed. But that would need to be carefully standardized - for example - number of hours a reasonably (average) fit hiker needs to reach the goal with an average pulse rate of 140 or whatever...

Having a good universal effort measure is important, because effort is one of key measures how difficult a tour is. The other one is technical difficulty. You can have a tower which requires only a little effort, but is very difficult regarding climbing skills. That's why we have good technical difficulty scales (SAC scale for hiking, all sorts of scales for technical climbing).

And the story of tour difficulty is not finished yet. Having effort and technical difficulty equal, one tour can be easy and the other one very demanding regarding orientation. Especially on a difficult terrain, where modern navigation is of little help. A good description helps - if there's one available and you are not left to apply moment-to-moment judgement.

And finally, there's also a psychological element, coming from situations, where you can't belay well, or there's huge objective danger (rock fall, avalanches, etc.) or simply due to vertigous situation, which itself is not dangerous, but has an impact as well.

Regards!
Vid

vanman798

vanman798 - Nov 21, 2019 12:52 pm - Hasn't voted

Re: Very interesting article!

Thanks for your comment. I'm glad to know you found the article interesting. Haven't you done some articles about the effort of mountain climbing?

The scale could be applied to any grouping of mountains one defined. In this case the grouping is US State Highpoints, and that is the only thing US oriented about it. The equation could be modified to do unit conversion thus not being limited to miles/feet.

Have a great day!!!

TerriRowe

TerriRowe - Nov 21, 2019 12:29 pm - Voted 10/10

Definitely an A+ for content, writing, and of course effort!

As a two time 48 finisher and statistics major, I loved this!

vanman798

vanman798 - Nov 21, 2019 12:34 pm - Hasn't voted

Re: Definitely an A+ for content, writing, and of course effort!

I'm so glad to hear you liked it, and that you appreciate the mathematical nature of it. I minored in Stats in college. :)

Two time 48 finisher is impressive!!! When are you heading to Alaska and Hawaii? :)

TerriRowe

TerriRowe - Nov 21, 2019 7:21 pm - Voted 10/10

Re: Definitely an A+ for content, writing, and of course effort!

First woman to repeat the 48. Did HI's HP once. Won't be doing AK's Denali unless someone else pays for it.

vanman798

vanman798 - Nov 22, 2019 8:07 am - Hasn't voted

Re: Definitely an A+ for content, writing, and of course effort!

I did Denali for under $5K. The trick to keeping the cost down is to go self-guided and to buy used gear (but keep it quality).

Congrats on the double 48s though. Nice accomplishment.

MikeLJ

MikeLJ - Nov 27, 2019 8:53 am - Voted 10/10

Good article

Marie (my partner) and I met on a trip to the USA that included an ascent of Mt Elbert (Colorado) so we have one ticked off..... only 49 more to go!
Mike

vanman798

vanman798 - Nov 27, 2019 4:45 pm - Hasn't voted

Re: Good article

Only 49 eh! Well keep on trucking brother!

Viewing: 1-10 of 10