Welcome to SP!  -

[ Post a Comment ]
Viewing: 1-5 of 5    

ScottMinor corrections

Scott

Voted 10/10

Just some really minor corrections from a weather buff.

Utah County's climate is moderate with average daytime temperatures in the valley ranging from 36 F (2 C) in the winter to 93 F (34 C) in the summer. In the spring average daytime temperatures tend to hover around 71 F (22 C), and in the fall daytime temperatures typically reach 65 F (19 C). Mountain areas may be as much as 20 F degrees cooler. The humidity levels are typically lower in the winter months than the rest of the year.

Average high in Provo (BYU) is 42 in winter, 66 in summer, 91 in summer, and 67 in fall. Humidity is actually higher in winter, but the air is drier because cold air holds less water than warm air.

Rain fall is very low ranging from about two inches per month in the spring to less than one inch a month in the summer.

In Provo, only July has less than one inch precipitation.

Provo averages 15 inches of snowfall per year, whereas the Unita Mountains receive over 300 inches.

Provo actually gets an average of 56 inches of snow at the BYU station. The other main station, the KAYK has incomplete snow data, so make sure not to take it from there.

Provo Peak itself is estimated to get near 600 inches of snow. Alta gets 514 and is probably pretty close to figures for Buckly Mountain, but it could be a bit less since there isn't as much lake effect around Buckley.

For precipitation on Buckley, the SNOTEL site on Cascade Mountain at 7768 feet recieves about 37 inches of rain a year (but data only avialable for 2003-2007 which is mostly in a perido of drought). Timp Divide in the rainshadow of Timpanogos and at 8150 feet recieves 39.2 inches (29 year average 1979-2007). Buckley is probably very similar, but a bit wetter.

Hope this helps a bit and in case you were curious.
Posted Oct 15, 2007 8:59 pm

vanman798Re: Minor corrections

vanman798

Hasn't voted

Thanks for the information. My temperature, humidity, and rainfall information was taken from the Utah County website as well as Weather2go.com, which I feel are reliable. My Provo snow fall information was taken from a Real Estate website (so I will change that). My mountain snow fall information is based on annual snowfall averages of Sundance (320 inches) and Alta (over 500 inches). Since Buckley is lower than Sundance I reasoned that its snow fall must be lower, and without the lake effects of Alta I reasoned that it must be significantly lower (that's why I ski at Alta and not Sundance). Also I read on the Y-mountain page that Y-mountain has low risks of avalanche, and I felt that is because it gets less snow than Sundance. Also on the Maple Mountain page it is mentioned that a ski resort was investigated for that mountain, and since it wasn't approved I reasoned it must get less snow than Sundance. So over 300 inches, is a safe estimate on my part.

I appreciate you taking the time to read and comment on my page.
Posted Oct 15, 2007 10:49 pm

ScottRe: Minor corrections

Scott

Voted 10/10

My mountain snow fall information is based on annual snowfall averages of Sundance (320 inches) and Alta (over 500 inches). Since Buckley is lower than Sundance I reasoned that its snow fall must be lower, and without the lake effects of Alta I reasoned that it must be significantly lower (that's why I ski at Alta and not Sundance).

Buckley is actually quite a bit higher than Sundance.

Anyway, here are the best sites for weather info if you are interested:

http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/summary/climsmut.html

Snotel is mountain specific, but it's info isn't that user friendly:

Snotel

So over 300 inches, is a safe estimate on my part.

It's definately safe to say more than 300 inches, but I was confused since the page said "Unita Mountains". I assume you meant Uinta Mountains, but those are a really long way from Buckley Mountain.

Anyway, it's a still a good page and a nice mountain. I just thought you might be interested. Nice to see more pages in the Wasatch.
Posted Oct 15, 2007 11:19 pm

vanman798Re: Minor corrections

vanman798

Hasn't voted

Thanks again! I typed Uinta Mountains, but meant to say Wasatch Range. Is 300 inches a good estimate for that range? Thanks for the links.

You are right about the elevation of Buckley exceeding Sundance. I always thought Sundance was higher.

:)
Posted Oct 15, 2007 11:24 pm

ScottRe: Minor corrections

Scott

Voted 10/10

Thanks again! I typed Uinta Mountains, but meant to say Wasatch Range. Is 300 inches a good estimate for that range? Thanks for the links. :)

Depends on the side/area. Because of the lake effect, the higher areas of the Wasatch between Mill Creek and Provo Peak get 400-550 (up to 600+ on the highest peaks) inches of snow above 8000 feet on their west side. The east sides get much less, around 300 at the same elevations.

For example, compare Alta with the Park City Summit House:

Alta

Park City Summit House (though unfortuantely the record is only from nine years, but it still demonstrates which side gets more snow).

Both are at similar elevations (8710 at Alta and 9280 at Park City Summit House). The east side of the Wasatch gets less snow than the western slopes.

Interestingly though, by spring and summer the east sides of the high ridges will have more snow due to wind loading and the fact that the east sides are shaded during the hottest part of the day (afternoon and evenings). Therefore on say Mount Timpanogos, all the "semi permanent snow" (lasting through most summers) is on the east side.

Farther out, the areas around Ogden to the Wellsvilles are another area of the Greater Wasatch that has the lake effect. Ben Lomond is the wettest known place in Utah and the US Rockies with an average of near 70 inches of precipitation a year. 1984 had 110.4 inches of precip which is both a record for Utah and anywhere in the Rockies. In a populated place, the record belongs to Alta with 108.54 inches in 1983. The west side and ridgetops of the Wasatch get's a lot of snow and precip, but the east not quite as much.
Posted Oct 15, 2007 11:40 pm

Viewing: 1-5 of 5    
[ Return to 'Buckley Mountain' main page ]