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Carpathians Additions and Corrections


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aiwaLocation

Voted 9/10

Geologically some parts of inner and outer western carpathians belongs to Austria
Posted Feb 26, 2008 5:46 pm

peterbudRe: Location

peterbud

Hasn't voted

Yes, however they are often disregarded as such. There is also discussion about where do they "end" in the south. I did not want to go that deep into this kind of geological discussion as it is not the main focus of the site, but thanks for the addition.
Posted Feb 28, 2008 9:22 am

visentinRe: Location

visentin

Voted 10/10

Few words would be also welcome to raise the issue - controversed or not - of what some call the "Serbian Carpathians". Karpaterna is the guy for that !
Posted Sep 30, 2009 4:16 pm

yatsekRe: Location

yatsek

Voted 10/10

The FEW words :) are in the first paragraph:
"in geologic terms the Carpathians extend a bit beyond the Danube"
Posted Oct 1, 2009 7:49 am

visentinRe: Location

visentin

Voted 10/10

"beyond the Danube" north or south ? :)
North => the unsignificant rock on the other shore in Austria, which the locals call proudly the "Austrian Carpathians"
South => there is a famous national park in Serbia called Banat. Worth being mentionned, even considering it doesn't make the unanimity ! (you've mentioned Romanian Banat but Serbian not)
Posted Oct 1, 2009 9:10 am

peterbudRe: Location

peterbud

Hasn't voted

North:
Can you give some references? If you google "√Ėsterreichische Karpaten", the results will be anything but convincing.

South:
No trace of "Banat National Park", either (should be "Nacionalni Park Banat"). What you might be talking of is NP Derdap:

http://www.npdjerdap.org.

However, Banat is strictly north of the Danube, and is actually not the name of the mountains but a much broader area, including parts of the Pannonian Great Plain. The mountains of Banat are in the part which belongs to Romania now:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/93/Banat_map.svg
Posted Oct 1, 2009 11:13 am

visentinRe: Location

visentin

Voted 10/10

North : Hundsheimer Berge
http://www.turistickamapa.sk/?x=16.93809&y=48.13248
South : yes, ?erdap (or Djerdap), I mixed the name.
The page you found is probably the one I once watched, but I don't recognize it at all...
Posted Oct 1, 2009 1:19 pm

peterbudRe: Location

peterbud

Hasn't voted

North: Yes, I am aware of the area (also called as Hainburger Berge, but not "Austrian Carpathians"). The question is that whether we shall talk about it in more detail or not. As you mentioned, it's an unsignificant block. The only noteworthy thing about it is that it's located on the other side of the Danube - otherwise it would be just the southern end of the Little Carpathians. Perhaps just mentioning the name in those brackets Jacek cited would do.

South: As for Djerdap NP in the strict sense, it should be rather noted as such on a page dealing with NP-s of SE Europe. As for the whole group of those mountains south from the Iron Gate, I'd welcome further information. Right now the best I could find is Wiki, which is generally considered as a weak source needing reassurement.
Posted Oct 1, 2009 5:55 pm

yatsekRe: Beyond the Danube?

yatsek

Voted 10/10

The Austrian Carpathians, despite being an upland rather than real mountains, also boast fine scenery, plus interesting views of the Alps.:)

Let's not forget the Visegrad Mts in Hungary.:))

The mts of Banat and those of the N chunk of Eastern Serbia's can be seen as two halves of the same mtn group. In geologic terms, they form one block cut by the gorge of the Danube. As far as I can remember, once you, Eric, compared it to the Pieniny split by the Dunajec River, and you were right. In fact, there are three river options for the SW end of the Carpathians:
1 The Danube.
2 The Velika Morava and Crni Timok rivers in Serbia.
3 The Upper Timis (Temes) and the Mehadica rivers in Romania.
Posted Oct 1, 2009 8:37 pm

yatsekRe: Serbian

yatsek

Voted 10/10

Thanks very much for your query, Eric, you're right - those Serbian "Carpatho-Balkans" ought to be mentioned on a page like this; we're currently working on the changes in the text.
Posted Oct 3, 2009 7:23 am

peterbudRe: Serbian

peterbud

Hasn't voted

The info has been incorporated at last! It's solely me who's to be blamed for taking so long time, Jacek prepared the text much earlier. Sorry guys, sometimes I need way much time to chew things :)
Posted Jan 13, 2010 9:10 am

visentinwhere are my...

visentin

Voted 10/10

Cho?ské Vrchy in your diagram ? :(
Posted Sep 30, 2009 4:09 pm

peterbudRe: where are my...

peterbud

Hasn't voted

They're there and they're not there :) - The current link points to Velky Choc, because when I first compiled the links, the area did not have a page, only the mountain. Since then you've added the area, and I forgot to take note of that. Will be corrected soon!
Posted Sep 30, 2009 5:19 pm

peterbudRe: where are my...

peterbud

Hasn't voted

Corrected.
Posted Sep 30, 2009 5:33 pm

visentinRe: where are my...

visentin

Voted 10/10

Thanks ! But I meant, in the Crystalline belt table. Perhaps to small to have its place ?
Posted Oct 1, 2009 3:02 am

yatsekRe: where are my...

yatsek

Voted 10/10

Thanks for your question Eric. Although the term "crystalline" doesn't normally refer to limestone, most of the Carpathian limestone does occur within/around the crystalline (granite/gneiss) blocks (more info in the "Geology and Physiography" chapter), including some of your/our favourite areas, such as the Tatry Bielskie, or Vratna-Rozsutec in the Mala Fatra. We have listed the most interesting limestone areas, including your Chocske Vrchy, below the flysch-crystalline-volcanic tables. (On the maps, they're represented by white triangles.)
Posted Oct 1, 2009 6:21 am

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