Welcome to SP!  -

Currant Mountain Additions and Corrections


[ Post an Addition or Correction ]
Viewing: 1-4 of 4    

ScottySUntitled Comment

ScottyS

Voted 10/10

Whoa, there is some bizarre error in the above (starts to repeat in the 3rd paragraph). If this is integrated into the main text, keep that in mind......
Posted Feb 9, 2005 4:47 pm

ScottySUntitled Comment

ScottyS

Voted 10/10

Also, it is noteable that the White Pine Range is home to the largest continuous stand of Bristlecone Pine (Pinus longaeva), the longest-lived species of tree. In fact, a member of this species is the oldest-known living thing in the world.



Studies of these trees have yielded multi-millennia-long datasets of past climate information (the Bristlecone chronology from the White Mountains was even used to re-calibrate the Carbon-14 dating scale).



While studies have been done on the White Pine Range, it has not got the extensive attention that the White Mountains and Great Basin NP stands have. Accordingly, there is still much work to be doneAlso, it is noteable that the White Pine Range is home to the largest continuous stand of Bristlecone Pine (Pinus longaeva), the longest-lived species of tree. In fact, a member of this species is the oldest-known living thing in the world.



Studies of these trees have yielded multi-millennia-long datasets of past climate information (the Bristlecone chronology from the White Mountains was even used to re-calibrate the Carbon-14 dating scale).



While studies have been done on the White Pine Range, it has not got the extensive attention that the White Mountains and Great Basin NP stands have. Accordingly, there is still much work to be done in this and other high-altitude areas of Nevada. The arid treeline environment is perfect for preserving remnant wood for centuries, and the White Mountain studies have been able to reconstruct a continuous tree-ring chronology over 6500 years long, even though the oldest living specimens are less than 5000 years in age.



When camping in or near the Bristlecone stand at high-altitude, please be conscientious of this, and try to use firewood that is obviously from recent/green or young trees. Old, weathered wood may be 50 years old, or 2000 --- there is no easy way to tell until it is cross-dated by a dendrochronologist. The remnant wood contains priceless data on past climate trends, which can tell us much about how the Great Basin regional climate reacts to changes on larger scales.



As the White Pine Range pine forests are relatively inaccessible, these Bristlecones have survived the mining/logging eras in the region, hunting and ranching camps, and so on. The future crowds of recreationalists that will be exploring the Great Basin over the next 50 years would do well to be mindful of the treasures contained in remote mountain areas.



(As a side note, places that have been populated for much longer by developed societies, such as Asia and Europe, have very few ancient trees relative to North America due to the wood being carted off and used)



Yes, anti-enviro Scotty is posting a plea to “save the trees”.
Posted Feb 8, 2005 8:03 pm

ScottySUntitled Comment

ScottyS

Voted 10/10

Whoa, there is some bizarre error in the above (starts to repeat in the 3rd paragraph). If this is integrated into the main text, keep that in mind......
Posted Feb 9, 2005 4:47 pm

Chris ZumwaltUntitled Comment

Hasn't voted

The unmarked primitive road that breaks off of County Road 1164 and 1163 is in terrible shape. You can only get about a mile in off of 1164 and maybe 2 miles off 1163 and it takes a burly 4x4 just to do that. You would need an ATV to trek the whole road and get to the suggested parking spot. So basically expect to add a few miles of road walking. I'd suggest to attack it from the County Road 1163 side as you can get a little closer to the suggested take-off spot.



That mfr is steep with no trails so be prepared.
Posted Sep 6, 2005 8:01 pm

Viewing: 1-4 of 4    
[ Return to 'Currant Mountain' main page ]