Welcome to SP!  -
Viewing: 1721-1726 of 1726 « PREV 1 ... 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 NEXT »
Two February Days in the
Sangres Two February Days in the Sangres  by Brad Snider

Having forsaken my comfortable bed in Aurora six hours earlier, I had no need to remind myself why I was so crazy when the vista opened up to reveal the Sangre de Cristo mountains. Josh had never been here, and I was eager to return. We could already see the mountain we would be attempting, Columbia Point (formerly known as “Kat Carson”). Conditions looked good, and we had the whole weekend free to explore the mighty Colorado Sangres.

More
Autumn In Carnia Autumn In Carnia  by Vid Pogachnik

It's always a nice feeling to come in mountains with a sleeping bag and a small tent on a rucksack, ready to spend somewhere high more than just one day. And especially, if the mountain area is attractive and new to you. As other foreigners, also Slovenians don't go often on the mountains of Carnia. We have our wonderful Julian Alps, when going abroad we choose famous Dolomites or Hohe Tauern, but when you start discovering them, you find Carnic Alps like beautiful pearls. There's still loneliness, there you might still find normal ascents on important mountains, which are unspoiled with steel pegs, cables and excessive colour marks, there's places, offering great scenery and panoramas.

More
Banji
North, Transylvania Ave Banji North, Transylvania Ave  by BobK

Banji peak was the first mountaineering peak to be climbed in the Bipeng Valley and is usually climbed from the west via the drainage that flows out just below Shanghaizi. I had climbed Banji in October 2004 via the west route under clear blue skies and low humidity allowing for stunning views and photos of the peaks in the upper reaches of Bipeng Valley. One of the most impressive peaks was Banji North and I was determined to come back and climb again because the possibility for first ascents on classic alpine routes was nearly unlimited.

More
Quandary - Feb 13 2006 Quandary - Feb 13 2006  by sshankle

By the end of January, 2006 I knew I was going to have to make a business rip to Denver sometime during mid February, so I immediately started planning for my first 14’er. I have a good friend that just moved to Denver and I lined him up for a climb the day before I had to show up for work. After some research I settled on Quandary. Good winter access. High elevation trailhead. Relatively safe from avalanche danger. I felt like I had a plan, only now I needed some extra gear. I had never before been in an environments where snowshoes would be a requirement, so I had to get a pair. I also felt like a glove upgrade was in order, after all I was going to a higher altitude than I had ever been before (by over 2000 feet) in winter! But, after one delivery from Backcountry.com, I was set.

More
Notes from Telescope Peak Notes from Telescope Peak  by Steve Larson

Every raindrop should return to the sea. It seems the order of the world, like breathing, like blood circulating from heart to lungs to the body and back. But not in the Basin and Range province of the western United States. In this fractured, arid landscape expectations are upended. Grass widow rivers meet inglorious ends in mile-deep salt oubliettes. There is something disturbing about this place, something antithetical to life that is at once repulsive and fascinating. My first visit to Death Valley left a deep impression. It was an August afternoon. Thunderheads towered overhead, curtains of rain hung from their bellies, evaporating in midair. Water pooled by the roadside. Flash floods deposited debris at will in broad, flat plains, erasing the asphalt delineations of mankind. At Furnace Creek the temperature was 127 degrees, humidity close to one hundred percent.

More
Aconcagua 2005-06. My
thoughts and dreams. Aconcagua 2005-06. My thoughts and dreams.  by William Marler

You train all year and sit at your desk thinking about being where you are now. The sound of the roaring rivers. The wind. The stars the solitude and silence. Then when you are actually there, you find yourself thinking of home. Its a paradox. Somebody slap me. My dry cough was making some people nervous. For this reason I have a tent all to myself. They were worried that I had a cold and would pass it on to them perhaps spoiling their summit attempt. While Laurie tried to reassure them that it is the dry air, that I always have this dry hack on Aconcagua. I was given the single tent. While initially puzzled by this feeling of being in purgatory, I try and make it work to my advantage. It’s much easier to organize yourself when it’s only your gear in the tent. Certainly more private with the pee bottle.

More
Viewing: 1721-1726 of 1726 « PREV 1 ... 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 NEXT »