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Peak Z and Peak Y from Peak...

 
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 Peak Z and Peak Y from Peak...
Peak Z and Peak Y from Peak X's broken slopes. September 2005. Jon Bradford

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John PraterPeak Y?

John Prater

Hasn't voted

I meant to comment on this after looking at Kane's Y/Z page. I've not been into the area, but I don't believe that is Peak Y in this photo. Kramarsic identifies Peak Y as the summit north-northeast of Peak X with the 12,960' contour but no given elevation. I haven't come across any photos here that include that summit. Kramarsic also includes Peak 12,980 (with the elevation given on the map), which I think is the summit you've labeled as Peak Y in this photo, as a separate peak in his book. Roach also lists these peaks separately, and the Parent/Mile/Rise info in his list indicate that Peak Y is indeed the summit just NNE of Peak X. Note that Roach extrapolates Peak Y to 12,980' while Kramarsic uses the highest contour of 12,960'. I know Theron's map has Peak Y marked as the summit with the given elevation of 12,980', but I think that is incorrect. Or is Kramarsic wrong? I guess I should check the April 1966 Trail and Timberline. Thoughts?



Jon, as always, wonderful photos!



John
Posted Sep 30, 2005 1:32 am

JonBradfordRe: Peak Y?

JonBradford

Hasn't voted

John,

My information for Peak Y's location came from the notated Theron Welch .TPO file... If that is incorrect then my assumptions are all wrong. I don't know where Kane got his info but I think it is likely he used the same map data. With that said I'd think it a shame if 12,980 proves not to be Y as they are a nice aesthetic pair. Please let me know what you find out from T&T. Thanks for the compliment ob the photos too. Much appreciated.

Cheers

Jon
Posted Sep 30, 2005 7:14 pm

KaneRe: Peak Y?

Kane

Voted 10/10

That would be weird to know that all this time we were looking at the wrong mountain. If it is so, then It gives me a good reason to go back! Seems very coincedental that the point southeast that Theron calls Y is the same elevation as the bump on the ridgebetween X and Z.



Often peaks recieve a name because of how they view; Therons point views prominent from Usable Pass, the only reasonable entrance into the Boulder Creek drainage from the more popular west side of the Gores. You can certainly argue that that point could be named.



The other point doesn't seem near as prominent. I wonder why it would be named. Although it does look a little better from that lake inbetween X and Y. The following shows a shot of Peak X (in red) and the other point just n-northeast of X (in yellow). I can't figure out why it would be named.





Posted Sep 30, 2005 8:00 pm

JonBradfordRe: Peak Y?

JonBradford

Hasn't voted

Kane and John,

Therons trip report indicates he came up the Boulder Creek drainage to climb Y & Z. The few photos he has of Y seems consistent with the assumption he went up the 12,980 ft summit that Kane called Y.

Jon
Posted Sep 30, 2005 8:05 pm

John PraterRe: Peak Y?

John Prater

Hasn't voted

Finally got a chance to check out the April 1966 T&T. The article, "Names on the Gores", by William Bird Mounsey, says the following:



Logically the lettering system could be extended to include the peaks around the head of the main Slate Creek, and the alphabet would last just long enough to get the job done. Peak 13021' (U); Peak 13019' (V); the peak, 12750', whose north ridge divides the upper forks of the main Slate Creek (W); Peak 13055' (X); Peak 12954' (Y); and Peak 13100' (Z).



Well, this doesn't clarify anything to me since the elevations in the article are all old. "Kramarsic's Peak Y" makes some sense, based on the article, since it lies on the Slate Creek drainage ridge line whereas "Theron's Peak Y" sits back off that ridge line. However, the article does seem to give a surveyed elevation for the proposed Peak Y, and our current maps have a surveyed elevation for "Theron's Peak Y" but no surveyed elevation for "Kramarsic's Peak Y". Anything to make of that? Also, I'm sure this article is not "final" on these unofficial names, as the article suggests that Peak I be the peak we now know as The Spider.



Ah well, I dunno...
Posted Oct 20, 2005 2:00 am

RyanSRe: Peak Y?

RyanS

Voted 10/10

I'm jumping into an old discussion here, but I tend to agree with John. The layout of the alphabet peaks is very systematic elsewhere in the range.

Following the ridgeline from SW to NE, it seems strange that they would have labeled the 13,085' summit Peak X, but then skipped a major 12,980' summit, and then placed Peak Y east of Peak Z.
Posted Aug 3, 2007 1:37 pm

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JonBradfordSubmitted by JonBradford
on Sep 29, 2005 8:43 pm

Image ID: 128729
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Lat/Lon: 39.70560°N / 106.2599°W
Object Title: Peak Z and Peak Y from Peak...