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Climbing with a camera?

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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby Wastral » Sun Jan 08, 2012 9:52 pm

Yup, that will buy you about 2 stops of DR. Why I prefer manual as it lest me set what I clip. Highlights or shadows.

Been looking at LX3 heavily and its like minded cams quite a bit recently. Kinda drooling over the new crop of cams with APS-C sensors in a tiny body though. Fuji X100 or Sony 77 or Nikon J. Though I do need a high depth of field replacement camera for flowers etc. That camera is the Fuji X10 IMO with its 2/3 sensor.

If I had the money I would pick up a Fuji X10 in a flash. Ah, wait 2 years and it will be 1/2 price. Ah patience. But then again all of these cams or most of them do not have a true grip to be able to hold said cam with a glove on and use one handed so this makes all of these cameras no better as a climbing camera than a traditional sized DSLR. My Sony R1 with its large grip I can operate with one hand while the other is belaying my partner. A not to unimportant fact eh?

albanberg wrote:Cool Wastral, thanks for the info.

I've had some editing done with the P&S LX3 which has worked well. I shoot 2 pics of the same scene with different exposures (sky/foreground) and have them combined later. When I have done this even a big DR would not have made a difference as the range was too big.
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby albanberg » Sun Jan 08, 2012 10:09 pm

Yeah, I like the looks of the X100 a lot for harder/higher climbs (not that I do anything extreme), I looked a bit at the X10, which looks nice too.

On the amount of DR, not sure how many "stops," but in my experience with the LX3 in the mountains, if shot for the shadows the sky is completely blown out and if shot for the sky you can't see the shadows and can't bring them back properly in post.

I'll have to learn how to measure the DR. Or I can continue to just ignore that detail and shoot like I have been, which seems to work fine...lol

Fun to talk cameras with someone knowledgeable.
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby Wastral » Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:30 am

albanberg wrote:Fun to talk cameras with someone knowledgeable.


I wouldn't go that far, just someone who hopefully isn't completely full of shit.

Good pictures generally have nothing to do with the camera used. At least its very rare.
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby radson » Mon Jan 09, 2012 4:47 pm

New Canon Compact released today with large CMOS sensor. Im not a fan of WA at only 28mm but still worth a look.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/01/09/CanonG1X_Preview
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby Wastral » Mon Jan 09, 2012 8:50 pm

radson wrote:New Canon Compact released today with large CMOS sensor. Im not a fan of WA at only 28mm but still worth a look.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/01/09/CanonG1X_Preview


From my perspective, 24mm isn't much better especially if I am going to stitch anyways. Real reason I go with a DSLR as I find I use Nikon 16-35 quite often to get the whole pic in without stitching afterwards. Especially if you are taking a picture of a tall mountain/spire or any building.
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby jthomas » Fri Jan 13, 2012 4:27 pm

Jaskic wrote:@radson- that's awesome! I'm looking through the Clik website and they have some pretty killer options to make this work. I think longer term, that's the exact direction I will want to go in. But for my first attempt, I think the P&S is probably safer, i.e. not an additional weight hooked onto me that might screw with my balance.

Like many other things here, I feel like this will end up being a personal preference issue. As @mooner notes, you can make the practical argument about what the P&S can achieve given it's technical limitations as compared to the DSLR. But lot's of pretty experienced people (in this thread and others) have made the argument that the P&S achieves what one would want out of mountain/climbing photography without sacrificing weight/safety/ease of use/access.


Look into a Nikon J1 or V1. While somewhat larger than the typical P/S, the quality is totally in another league. I carried a DSLR for years, but I tried out the J1 and was totally blown away. Yes, the DSLR is ultimately better if you are going to make poster size prints, but seriously, how many people actually do that? Plus, it takes great video if that is of interest.

http://mansurovs.com/nikon-1-v1-review/all/1
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby CClaude » Fri Jan 13, 2012 6:28 pm

I'll climb with my DSLR all the time. If you are looking for an alternative, a photographer I've worked with who shoots professionally (National Geo, Alpinist, Vertical, and teaches courses to professional photographers how to maximize Canon camera's) recommended a Canon G10 or G12. Its a point and shoot with a lot of DSLR capabilities.
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby Sierra Ledge Rat » Mon Jan 16, 2012 2:34 pm

If you really want good photos, then a dSLR is the only way to go. Perhaps a choice of a Nikon is not the best, there are smaller and lighter dSLR cameras available. I have the Pentax K-x, the smallest dSLR on the market.

You have to carry the camera in a readily-accessible location or you won't shoot any photos. Carrying your camera inside of you backpack is a good way not to take photos. I carry dSLR in a camera bag that is attached to my backpack waistband.

I also carry a small weatherproof point-and-shoot. When I can't or won't break out the dSLR I can always pull out the weatherproof camera.

An axiom of climbing photography is that you get your best photos at the times when you are least likely to pull out the camera, e.g., during bad storms.
Last edited by Sierra Ledge Rat on Wed Jan 18, 2012 3:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby radson » Mon Jan 16, 2012 5:17 pm

An axiom of climbing photography is that you best photos at the times when you are least likely to pull out the camera, e.g., during bad storms.


Totally agree and something I am always trying to improve on.
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby ExcitableBoy » Mon Jan 16, 2012 5:45 pm

I didn't see this mentioned, so I thought I'd throw it out there. I have short, thick, fumbly fingers. Wearing big gloves while ice climbing, alpine climbing, or mountaineering makes it impossible to take photos, so I wear thin, cheap poly pro liner gloves under my heavier ones. When I take photos I can remove a glove and not expose bare skin to the elements, yet still have the dexterity to operate the small buttons.
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby Kai » Mon Jan 16, 2012 5:55 pm

Sierra Ledge Rat wrote:If you really want good photos, then a dSLR is the only way to go.



That used to be true. Not really true any more.

Pocket cameras and mirrorless cameras with interchangeable lenses are getting better and better.

A high quality pocket camera (i.e. Panaxonic LX5, Canon S100, Fuji X10, Fuji X100 ) is capable of very good image quality.

A high quality mirrorless camera (i.e. PEN E-P3, Sony Nex-7, Fuji X-Pro 1) will also do very well. The Nex-7 likely has better image quality than most DSLR's.

With larger sensors being shoe-horned into smaller and smaller cameras, DSLR's are losing their edge. There are a lot of viable alternatives now, even for "serious" photography.
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby radson » Mon Jan 16, 2012 7:32 pm

ExcitableBoy, I have a similar disability :p I choose my main gloves with keepers or lanyards, so i can flick them off to get to my liner without worry.

I agree Kai, the only caveat being that the smaller the camera, the smaller the buttons. As per excitableboy, some buttons on some cameras (im looking at you sony in particular ) are almost impossible to depress or change settings.
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby ExcitableBoy » Mon Jan 16, 2012 11:03 pm

radson wrote:ExcitableBoy, I have a similar disability :p I choose my main gloves with keepers or lanyards, so i can flick them off to get to my liner without worry.



I do the same. Any gloves that don't come with lanyards, I add my own made of boot laces and cord locks. I learned this habit the hard way. On top of Point Success on Mt Rainier, I had taken a glove off to tie my boots. I put the glove in my mouth. My partner asked me a question and I answered and then watched my glove slide 4,000 ft down into the abyss. :o
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby CClaude » Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:10 am

Kai wrote:
Sierra Ledge Rat wrote:If you really want good photos, then a dSLR is the only way to go.



That used to be true. Not really true any more.

Pocket cameras and mirrorless cameras with interchangeable lenses are getting better and better.

A high quality pocket camera (i.e. Panaxonic LX5, Canon S100, Fuji X10, Fuji X100 ) is capable of very good image quality.

A high quality mirrorless camera (i.e. PEN E-P3, Sony Nex-7, Fuji X-Pro 1) will also do very well. The Nex-7 likely has better image quality than most DSLR's.

With larger sensors being shoe-horned into smaller and smaller cameras, DSLR's are losing their edge. There are a lot of viable alternatives now, even for "serious" photography.


Sort of disagree. Unless you are talking about a $2000+ full-frame DSLR, only a small portion of the camera is the sensor. The vast majority of the image quality is coming from (outside of the operator) the optics. Unfortunately, good optics are hard to minaturize. There is a reason why my wide angle zoom with a constant F2.8 has an 82mm diameter filter, whereas you could get a cheap one with a variable zoom (like a f4.5-5.6) with a filter in the 55-58mm diameter range.

As for the high quality mirrorless camera's I wonder how much light is lost since I believe they use semi-transparent mirrors, which only half the light goes to the sensors. Since I like taking pictures before sunrise, after sunset and when there isn't much light, I want my sensor getting all the light it can get.

They may be getting better, but in the mountains, I am like Sierra LedgeRat (like that handle man), but my dSLR is my main go to camera.
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Re: Climbing with a camera?

Postby radson » Tue Jan 17, 2012 1:12 am

CClaude

On my most recent trip. I was lured by the semi-transparent Sony A77 dSLR with a 16-50mm 2.8 lens. Low light and noise are not a strength of Sony cameras to date but kind of wanted to play with the video options along with auto stitch, 12 fps and other features. A stills photographer may decry these gimmicks but I personally thought was fun to play with. I certainly did not perceive any light loss in the electronic viewfinder from the translucent mirror, quite the opposite. For a geek like me, its incredible the amount of info an electronic viewfinder can display especially with regards to DOF.

I did though have a Nikon d7000 on standby , which i used for some intervalometer stuff (this is built in ) and some long exposures. If I had to go high and cold, Nikon would be my preferred option with a dSLR but the Sony A77 and I believe the Nex 7 are close contenders.

Predawn pic taken with A77
Image
Last edited by radson on Tue Jan 17, 2012 1:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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