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Peru solo

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Peru solo

Postby randobanjo » Sun May 27, 2007 2:41 am

Okay, so it sounds like there a load of people on SP with Cordillera Blanca experience. I'm looking for advice. I'm planning on heading down there during late July for around 16 days or so. Two full work weeks and a weekend on either side. I'd like to hang out in Quebrada Llanganuco. I'd like to knock off Pisco, Cholpicalqui and maybe one more.

Here's the thing - I'll be on my own. I'm planning on just flying down to Lima, bussing it to Huaraz, picking up a guide in Huaraz and going from there. I did this two seasons ago without any pre-planning or reservations in the Cordillera Real in Bolivia and it worked like a charm. Made some great friends and had a blast with a local guide named Andres. I'd like to do the same thing in Peru.

Questions:

1. Is it easy to pick up a qualified guide for a solo 12 day-ish climbing trip? Note that I am a fairly experienced climber and don't need any hand-holding.
2. Does anyone have specific recommendations for guides/services out of Huaraz that are flexible, easy to book on short notice and willing to take a solo climber?
3. Is there any reason why this would be a bad idea?
4. And finally, which peaks make good ski descents? I'm trying to decide whether to bring along the sticks.
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Guide in Peru

Postby Vic Hanson » Sun May 27, 2007 4:16 am

I live down in Southern Peru and have a friend and climbing buddy from Lima. He is a guide and has a adventure travel business there. I know you asked for a guide in Huaraz but Carlos is quite familiar with Huaraz, even though he doesn't live there. He is a recent past president of Camycam (as well as very active in it), a mountain climbing club in Lima and they do a lot of climbs in Huaraz. He speaks English faily well but his website is only in Spanish. He is careful, thorough, honest and I can recommend him highly.

Carlos Verdeguer

His email is: andestrek_peru@hotmail.com

Company website: www.andestrek.net

Here is the mountaineering page from his website

http://andestrek.net/andinismo.htm

Whatever you decide, have a great time!

Vic Hanson
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Postby MichaelJ » Sun May 27, 2007 4:56 am

If you're guided, it's not really a solo trip, and if you're a fairly experienced climber I don't know why you'd want a guide for a slog like Pisco, but in any event it's as easy as pie to find one at the Casa de Guias in Huaraz.
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Postby randobanjo » Sun May 27, 2007 5:05 am

Man, what is it with the attitude on these boards? I obviously don't mean a solo climb. I mean I'll be in South America by myself. Sheesh...

And I'd like to bring along a guide who 1) knows the terrain and 2) for the company. As for Pisco, I thought it might be a good peak to practice on and get good and acclimatized on before hitting a 6000-plus peak like Chopicalqi or Huascaran. Again, sheesh...

But thanks for the info.
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Postby MichaelJ » Mon May 28, 2007 4:42 pm

The family that runs Hostal Quintana also runs a guide service that a friend recommends: www.Mountclimbtravel.com
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Postby Tom Fralich » Wed May 30, 2007 5:00 pm

I went down last season with a friend from NY, but he got frostbite and had to go home. I found another acclimatized partner within 24 hours and climbed lots of good stuff. There are definitely people around looking for partners, but you can get lucky or unlucky. I happened to get really lucky with a great partner. If you only have 16 days, I wouldn't risk trying to find a partner on the spot. Either arrange with someone before you go or hire a guide for the individual climbs that you want to do. When my friend had to leave and I was scrambling around to find a partner, I checked at the Casa de Guias as a backup in the case that I couldn't find anyone. I could have hired a guide on the spot for the W Face of Tocllaraju, leaving the next day. So I don't think it's a problem to get a guide on short notice if that's what you want to do. Cheers.
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Postby randobanjo » Wed May 30, 2007 5:24 pm

Thanks for the input everyone. With all of this feedback, I'm feeling good about heading down there all willy-nilly like this. Just bought my ticket! I'm jumping out of my skin I'm so damned excited. Thanks again everyone for the input.
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Postby Duseks » Wed May 30, 2007 9:34 pm

Right on dude,

I'll be in a similar situation next season in Peru. I'm essentially living there for the season & getting an apartment in Huaraz... but I'll be alone. I totally hear on wanting a guide... if only for the company. MichaelJ really knows his shit, and your post was a little confusing, so don't mind the "attitude" too much and don't hesitate to ask for his or any other grumbly regular's advice.

Pisco is also on my list to get a taste of altitude etc. Honestly though there's really no need for a guide, lot's of people for company, and lot's of guides to simply "follow". Although if you got edema or something... (they'd take care of you regardless I'm sure, but that'd be pretty poor form).

Anyway I'd be curious about your experience, GOOD LUCK! Be safe and take lot's of pics. Gotta love spontaneous trips to the Andes!!!

-Scotty
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Postby randobanjo » Mon Jul 30, 2007 10:34 pm

Thanks everyone for the in put. Just got back. Had a fabulous trip. the Blanca is un-friggin-believable. There's a brief (read half-assed) trip report at www.sierra-alpinist.com. The full photo album is on the right under "Cordillera Blanca 2007."

Already looking forward to next season.... :D

Image
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Postby sistinas » Mon Jul 30, 2007 10:57 pm

Great pics... if you have more I'd love to see them. I am climbing Ishinca and Tocllaraju in early September.

(edit: n/m! I found your photo album. I need to learn to read better. Awesome pics, once again.)
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