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Nevado Tres Cruces Sur & Central

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Nevado Tres Cruces Sur & Central

Postby Jerry L » Fri Nov 16, 2007 7:03 pm

For the sake of conversation, I'm wondering what thoughts climbers have on this idea.

I plan to end my trip in South America with attempts on Nevado Tres Cruces Sur (6,748m) & Central (6,629m). My estimation is that this will take (5) to (6) days. Prior to this, I'll be climbing smaller peaks with much less time on the mountain. Because of that, I decided not to take plastic boots and heavy duty gaiters. I plan to climb with LaSportiva Makalus & Mountain Hardwear FTX Ventigaiters.

So, would you take plastics and have warm feet for sure, or would you carry less weight, have a boot that works better for your other climbs, and risk having cold feet ? Any thoughts ? I've been going back and forth on this one.
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Postby Corax » Tue Nov 20, 2007 6:53 pm

Excellent plan!
I'm sure you'll enjoy the area.
I climbed all the peaks in the Puna with a pair of ice-climbing boots which isn't really made for very cold environments. Therefore I brought a pair of super gaiters as a back up if the weather got nasty. I never used them as I was lucky with the temperatures. The last peak I climbed in the beginning of April and it was on the limit. I almost had to use my gaiters then.
I think you'll do fine without plastic boots.
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Postby Jerry L » Wed Nov 21, 2007 1:10 pm

Thanks for the replies. The one thing that got me second guessing my decision was reading the only trip reports on these two mountains. The author states that it got down to
-13 degrees when he climbed them. They seem to be rarely climbed and transportation is almost nonexistent (it seems). That got me thinking that it would really suck to bail from extreme cold, and then have to wait for nearly a week to get a ride out.
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Postby Corax » Wed Nov 21, 2007 9:54 pm

Jerry L wrote:Thanks for the replies. The one thing that got me second guessing my decision was reading the only trip reports on these two mountains. The author states that it got down to
-13 degrees when he climbed them. They seem to be rarely climbed and transportation is almost nonexistent (it seems). That got me thinking that it would really suck to bail from extreme cold, and then have to wait for nearly a week to get a ride out.


- 13.
I think the author was unlucky, or I was lucky with temperatures. Daytime it was never that cold when I climbed there. Perhaps he started very early in the morning or arrived back late? I haven't read the trip report.
The only times I had problems with the cold:
1. My feet got cold when climbing El Muerto as it's on snow and ice all the way. One of the few real glaciers on the Puna.
2. When I climbed Ojos del Salado in a blizzard. Then it was more the wind chill factor than the actual cold.

You can get a ride to Tres Cruces, or to very close by from the Argentinian side. I have no info about the Chilean side. Jonson Reynoso showed me his waypoints on an equivalent of GE and he had been very close. Jonson asked me if I wanted to be driven to the Tres Cruces area and then walk out by myself. In the end I set for a ride to Cazadero Grande, walked in to El Muerto, continued to Olmedo and Cazadero. Aimed for walking further towards Tres Cruces, but Nadine had a terrible tooth ache and we had to walk out.
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Postby Jerry L » Fri Nov 23, 2007 12:04 am

I had not considered entering from the Argentine side. From The Andes, A Guide for Climbers, John Biggar states that the access is much easier from the Chilean side. He says that "access to any of these peaks from Argentina involves a long and difficult 4x4 drive via Lag. Verde, Lag. Tres Quebradas, and Rio Salado". Maybe I should reconsider ? As I understand it, there would be no fees from the Argentine side opposed to the Chilean side which requires $160. That money could be put towards hiring a 4x4 in Argentina. Am I correct ? Any thoughts ?
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Postby Corax » Fri Nov 23, 2007 5:59 pm

Jerry L wrote:As I understand it, there would be no fees from the Argentine side opposed to the Chilean side which requires $160. That money could be put towards hiring a 4x4 in Argentina. Am I correct ? Any thoughts ?


No fees in Argentina.
I'm not sure how much the prices in Argentina has gone up since I as there and I can't remember the price I was quoted. The best is if you mail Reynoso and ask him what the deal is. I know he has had a lot of problem with both his website and his email. I'll try to dig them up for you and send them in a PM.
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Postby Jerry L » Fri Nov 23, 2007 7:18 pm

Got it. Thanks.
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Postby Jerry L » Tue Nov 27, 2007 2:35 pm

Also looking for partners to share the cost of transportation. $700 for up to (3) climbers, 30% deposit required. This is from Copiapo (the Chilean side). I'm also trying to look into access from the Argentine side. I plan to be in this area from approximately January 28 to February 6, 2008.
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Tres Cruces expe ?

Postby gnome » Sun Feb 17, 2008 6:52 pm

Jerry L wrote:Also looking for partners to share the cost of transportation. $700 for up to (3) climbers, 30% deposit required. This is from Copiapo (the Chilean side). I'm also trying to look into access from the Argentine side. I plan to be in this area from approximately January 28 to February 6, 2008.


Hi did you finaly get there ? What happened ?
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Postby Jerry L » Sun Feb 17, 2008 9:56 pm

I made it down there and climbed some other stuff, but I didn't climb these peaks. I gave up on the idea before I even left the states. CBakwin is down there right now, but I don't think he's going for these either.
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Postby CBakwin » Mon Feb 25, 2008 11:30 am

Correct Jerry,
I did Pissis and Ojos but got really good views or tres cruces Sur and that definatly put it on the list for me along with Incahuilsi.......another trip. At least I got a real good idea of what is involved in the transportation, Jonson is very helpful but going solo can be quite expensive since it cost as much to send one jeep with one guy as it does with three or four guys (people). Nearly the same for Mulas. Anyway, I really enjoyed my trip into that area and hopefully, in a few years, will find my way back....
By the way, I agree with Corax, while wind was a factor, cold was not (not that it couldn´t have been) I did not really bring gear to fair well in sustained -13 degree weather and I was plenty warm, never got below around 10 degrees F and even that was quite rare. Some snow and lots of wind. Toughest thing seems to be getting the frickin´map! A german topo that seems to be very rare and expensive....I borrowed Jonson´s.
Back to the states for hopefully some ice climbing in Cody before the season is over. Ciaou all.
Chris
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Postby Faster » Fri Feb 29, 2008 4:28 am

CB Was the base camp with the Tent and generator at Pissis still there?
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Postby CBakwin » Sat Mar 01, 2008 5:05 pm

No, there is still the remnants of the floor for it, but everything else is gone and there are no people there. I heard at one time there was a small comodor where they sold food, now everything is pretty barren. No water as you know, but a little way to Penatentes. So bring large containers of water to base, where you can drive to, so that you don't need to waste fuel making water there, and there is a lot of dust in the penetentes that you would not enjoy in your water. No running water anywhere on Pissis.
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