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Walkers Feet

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Walkers Feet

Postby Big Benn » Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:09 pm

Possibly one for us older SP'ers.

Both my doctor and I are working hard on trying to find the source of a mild flue like illness that has been hitting me for a very long time now, (decades).

We are getting clues it is caused by some sort of inflammation that shows up in blood tests, and has caused what has been treated as Arthritis. Usually something that periodically starts with my right big toe, and then moves around my right foot, but sometimes hits my left foot, (as at present).

Anyway. Walkers feet.

In examining my feet the other day my doc took one look and said "Walkers Feet"! A number of bruised looking toe nails: they do fall off with regularity.

And tonight he had the results of a foot x-ray he had done to see if there was any clue as to what was causing the inflammation. There wasn't. But the report (in medical geek), led my doc to say, "They are telling us you do a lot of walking: there is some minor damage there because of the walking".

So I wonder if anyone else here has a similar "problem" with the impact of years of walking on their feet?
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Postby ksolem » Wed Feb 03, 2010 6:38 pm

I had a relative who described similar difficulties for years, although I don’t recall him specifically referring to “flue like” symptoms unless by this you mean achiness. Ultimately he was diagnosed with “Morten’s Neuroma,” also called “Morten’s Metatarsalgia” or sometimes just “Metatarsalgia,” although the latter is not really the same thing. Wiki has some basics on these terms.

He started going barefoot as much as possible, never wearing shoes in the house etc., which helped him a lot.

I started having foot problems, mostly a tendency to pronate badly, after several seasons of back country climbing and carrying heavy loads. Again, wearing shoes as little as possible helped me get back to normal. Also exercising the feet and ankles by doing alphabets (while sitting around extend the leg and “write” the letters of the alphabet (or anything else you feel like writing) using your toes as the scribe. Circling, flexing and extending the foot, and doing standing heel raises all help to improve foot circulation and health. I like doing these while lying on my back on a mat with one leg extended straight up. The elevation enhances the circulatory effect.

If you suspect inflammation is a component, you might try a homeopathic anti inflammatory with Arnica. A product called Traumeel is available in pill form which I have had great results from. Personally I avoid NSAIDs like Ibuprofen. Many experts say that while they are effective at reducing inflammation they actually interfere with tissue healing, also they are tough on your kidneys.

As far as losing nails goes, I've never had that happen, but there have been threads here about that before. You might be able to search one up.

Just a few ideas. I am not a foot specialist at all, but have certainly used mine long and hard.
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Postby ksolem » Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:38 pm

Dingus Milktoast wrote:4. When walking down hill, barefoot or otherwise, try to come down on the ball of the foot first as often as possible. Its not ALWAYS the best footfall for going down hill, but often it is and it greatly reduces impact and bruising associated with heel stomping.
DMT


Yes. Glad to see you mention that. I've been trying to convince a certain person I hike with a lot on this one without much luck. It's a bit counter intuitive at first.

edit: I said this on another thread where I was preaching the gospel of bare feet: there is a learning curve re stubbing the toes so be careful...
Last edited by ksolem on Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby RayMondo » Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:44 pm

Regarding boots. Before starting downhill, rack the laces up to the shin, but first putting a half knot at the base of the shin. That'll permit the foot part to be laced less tightly whilst the shin part does all the holding back of the foot. That will prevent the foot travelling forward in the boot. And for sure, 2 pairs of socks. The inner one thin and smooth on the skin.

By the way Bryan, I recall something more about those bouts of perspiration. One cause is Hyperhidrosis. But don't get lured into Internet cures. The organisation I detoxed with were treating this successfully.

On those blood result clues. Is that in the haemoglobin ? I know a manifestation called Oxidative Stress. I had it. It's a bit alarming to see ones red cells looking like a colony of interlocking spiky thistles, when they should be smooth. But the full detox retreat I went on cured it in a week. (It shows up only in "live blood analysis", which most docs don't offer, despite all it needs is a microscope). Though I did not have any flu-like symptoms. But it is a contributory factory to arthritis, as is permeability of the gut. (Sorry to drift off subject).

<a href=http://www.oxis.com/oxidative_stress_complete.html>About Oxidative Stress</a>

<a href=http://www.genox.com/what_is_oxidative_stress.html>Oxidative Stress</a>

Purification of the whole body is the way to go.
Last edited by RayMondo on Wed Feb 03, 2010 8:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Big Benn » Wed Feb 03, 2010 8:05 pm

Some very interesting points above. Thanks. l need to re read to take them all in.

A few points before doing that. I never wear any sort of shoe indoors and hardly ever when wandering around my back garden.

My Mantas are quite large in the foot area, but I will now try to remember to re-do the laces on descents: that is the only time I can get foot pain.

I wear 1,000 miles socks. They are socks with a thin inside liner. I don't get blisters!
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