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You most memorable mountain(s)

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Postby rdesota » Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:20 pm

Ama Dablam. Summit Day = 2nd happiest day of my life
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Postby John Duffield » Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:55 pm

rdesota wrote:Ama Dablam. Summit Day = 2nd happiest day of my life


Then you'll probably recognize this. Tengboche is just visible - middle left.

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Postby rdesota » Wed Mar 17, 2010 5:08 pm

Nice!
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Postby fatdad » Wed Mar 17, 2010 6:14 pm

El Capitan: because, well, it's the Captain.
Mt. Rainer: it's just such a big, impressive peak.
Mt. Toubkal: a real interesting cultural experience where all the stars aligned to make it happen.

I'd be tempted to list the Thorang La, even though it's just a pass.
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Postby kamil » Wed Mar 17, 2010 6:55 pm

Grossglockner - solo up and down in a day from Lucknerhaus in almost winter conditions although it was 1 June, practically straight from driving across half the continent and friends' wedding - the mountain kicked the shite out of me although I made it to the summit :)
Maja Lagojvet in Prokletije (Albania/Montenegro) - first ascent of the peak, with a good friend, turned out to be quite an epic, a lot harder than we expected.
All other treks and climbs in Prokletije - there were several of them, always in great company. And the mountains are one of the wildest corners of Europe.
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Postby Hotoven » Wed Mar 17, 2010 7:22 pm

I will have to say Mt. Rainier. It was my first real alpine climb with real dangers. I learned so much, and did it with my best friend. It was a really fun climb, and I can't wait to do it again someday.

(In photo: My Uncle taking the photo, myself closest to the camera, my best friend in the middle, my uncles friend leading.)

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Postby adventurer » Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:10 pm

Mt. Rainier, via the Emmons Glacier route, for the sheer beauty of the mountain.

Aconcagua, via the polish traverse, for the self satisfaction gained from completing a 3 week high alt expedition.

A winter traverse of the Presidential Range in New Hampshire's White Mtns for teaching me the definition of "windy and cold"
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Most Memorable

Postby belexes » Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:32 pm

Mount of the Holy Cross and Longs Peak: both magnificent peaks, but I felt lousy on top.
Kilimanjaro: the trip of a lifetime to one of the 7 summits.
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Postby mconnell » Thu Mar 18, 2010 12:01 am

In no particular order:

- Longs Peak: First time I thought about taking up technical climbing. Learned NOT to watch thunderheads build while sitting on top of a peak.

- Aconcagua: My high point, made with my brother who I have rarely seen over the last 20 years.

- An unnamed peak in the Yukon (or maybe just into NW Territories), not far from the Arctic Circle. Most remote peak I've been on, done solo. Watched grizzlies fishing from the shoulder (about a mile away from them, which was close enough at the time!)

- North Pal: I just love that peak!
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Postby Ambret » Thu Mar 18, 2010 12:05 am

Shasta, a mountain that I've been in love with since age 7. Summited with my best friend from college after being chased off the first time by rock fall.
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Postby Tom Fralich » Thu Mar 18, 2010 12:28 am

Matterhorn

When I first started getting into mountaineering, I thought it would be incredible if I could ever make it up the thing, even with a guide. I was in Europe on several occasions early in my climbing career, but the stars never seemed to align. Years passed and I climbed in lots of places, including Peru, Ecuador, and two trips to NZ. Then one summer, I found myself in the Alps again and it seemed my time had come. For whatever reason, my partner wasn't interested, so after a month of climbing together, we parted ways and I boarded the train from Chamonix to Zermatt. I intended to solo, but secretly hoped that I might meet someone to climb along with, or even rope up with if necessary. Being early season, there were very few climbers at the hut, so I decided to take an afternoon stroll up the first hour of the route to see how it felt. It seemed to go effortlessly and I became more confident. I left the hut alone that night at 4AM and the entire world seemed reduced to the 20 ft radius illuminated by my headlamp. In all my climbs since, I've never felt as confident or as isolated as I did that night. I made it to the summit in just 4 hours and had the world to myself for a few minutes until another party arrived.

I've done bigger, nastier climbs since, but this will always be THE ONE. What once had seemed nearly impossible had become almost trivial. I think it was the day that I became a climber.
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Postby Hotoven » Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:36 pm

Tom Fralich wrote:Matterhorn

When I first started getting into mountaineering, I thought it would be incredible if I could ever make it up the thing, even with a guide. I was in Europe on several occasions early in my climbing career, but the stars never seemed to align. Years passed and I climbed in lots of places, including Peru, Ecuador, and two trips to NZ. Then one summer, I found myself in the Alps again and it seemed my time had come. For whatever reason, my partner wasn't interested, so after a month of climbing together, we parted ways and I boarded the train from Chamonix to Zermatt. I intended to solo, but secretly hoped that I might meet someone to climb along with, or even rope up with if necessary. Being early season, there were very few climbers at the hut, so I decided to take an afternoon stroll up the first hour of the route to see how it felt. It seemed to go effortlessly and I became more confident. I left the hut alone that night at 4AM and the entire world seemed reduced to the 20 ft radius illuminated by my headlamp. In all my climbs since, I've never felt as confident or as isolated as I did that night. I made it to the summit in just 4 hours and had the world to myself for a few minutes until another party arrived.

I've done bigger, nastier climbs since, but this will always be THE ONE. What once had seemed nearly impossible had become almost trivial. I think it was the day that I became a climber.


Great story! I love it when you get good examples of dreams coming true.
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Postby dskoon » Thu Mar 18, 2010 7:34 pm

Tom Fralich wrote:Matterhorn

When I first started getting into mountaineering, I thought it would be incredible if I could ever make it up the thing, even with a guide. I was in Europe on several occasions early in my climbing career, but the stars never seemed to align. Years passed and I climbed in lots of places, including Peru, Ecuador, and two trips to NZ. Then one summer, I found myself in the Alps again and it seemed my time had come. For whatever reason, my partner wasn't interested, so after a month of climbing together, we parted ways and I boarded the train from Chamonix to Zermatt. I intended to solo, but secretly hoped that I might meet someone to climb along with, or even rope up with if necessary. Being early season, there were very few climbers at the hut, so I decided to take an afternoon stroll up the first hour of the route to see how it felt. It seemed to go effortlessly and I became more confident. I left the hut alone that night at 4AM and the entire world seemed reduced to the 20 ft radius illuminated by my headlamp. In all my climbs since, I've never felt as confident or as isolated as I did that night. I made it to the summit in just 4 hours and had the world to myself for a few minutes until another party arrived.

I've done bigger, nastier climbs since, but this will always be THE ONE. What once had seemed nearly impossible had become almost trivial. I think it was the day that I became a climber.


Holy Mo-fo! That is indeed a great story, and an inspiring one.
I'd love to get up the Matterhorn someday, and it's interesting to see your evolution of hoping and wondering about the possibilities, to actually soloing the mountain. Great stuff!

For me, my most memorable mountains have been literally few, and far-between.
Climbed up Mt. Ritter when I was about 20yrs. old, with 2 other guys who were on my Forest Service trail crew, working in the then John Muir wilderness all summer. That particular day, about 14 of us headed out to climb it; some made it to the saddle between Ritter and Banner, whilst us 3 made it to the top. One of our 3 was a local boy with the guide book, and I was fortunate enough to keep up with him. Great summit under cloudy, cool skies!
Next big mountain came more recently, 2 summers ago, on Mt. Adams in Washington. 2nd attempt, and made it on a one-day solo effort. Unbelievable winds up high, and wasn't sure I'd make it, but did.
Then, last spring, finally made it up Mt. Hood. Also 2nd attempt, and came after wrenching my back only 3 days prior. So, I was a little proud of myself on that one. Good times, and looking forward to more to come.
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Postby Gafoto » Fri Mar 19, 2010 2:13 am

Gary Schenk wrote:
Gafoto wrote:...Mount Peale in the La Sals...


The La Sals look cool, even from a distance. I'd like to spend some time in them.


They're lonely, they could use the company! I was totally alone on the mountain itself but at the little parking area there were dozens of people, mostly in Jeeps. I think that because there isn't an official blazed trail with signs and so forth people just don't think to go climb those peaks.
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