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Measuring your achievements

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Re: Measuring your achievements

Postby Brad Marshall » Thu Feb 03, 2011 11:27 pm

ExcitableBoy wrote:Usually when I achieve big goals I am ultimately disappointed. I think because I always felt like if I do X then my life will be better.


I can understand this but for a different reason. To accomplish a big goal I do a lot of planning and put in a lot of effort. Once it's accomplished I realise it doesn't really mean that much in the grand scheme of things. Then again, as I'm getting older my priorities change and my "big goal" really wasn't that big in the first place. I only made it out to be that to motivate myself.
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Re: Measuring your achievements

Postby Brad Marshall » Thu Feb 03, 2011 11:32 pm

Vitaliy M wrote:I have mixed emotions about my goals and desires. One part of me is happy I found my passion. Other is disappointed because my relatives do not adore (to say the least) what I like the most. I am not looking for a better job, and care less about a promotion. All I want to do is be out there, see the sun rise, climb, see natural beauty. I am not a drug addict, I do not smoke, do not drink, have a job that supports me well, and found my passion. Do not understand why I am such a failure to many...
When I accomplish my goal, I am very happy about getting it done, sad it is over. Drained for a couple of following days. And pick a next goal after.


Don't smoke and don't drink? No wonder you're disappointed at times. :lol:

Seriously, your a true adventurer. I don't know who said it but it goes something like this:

"a true adventurer is someone who immediately starts planning their next adventure after accomplishing their last".

In my book you're no a failure.
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Re: Measuring your achievements

Postby phydeux » Sat Feb 05, 2011 2:53 pm

The best example I can think of is an early Himalyian explorer who, after numerous trips to conquer the big mountains, became more fascinated with the lower peaks, valleys, and people of the southern Asia region (I think it was H. Tillman?). I've done a few big, 'trophy' peaks, but lost interest in that type of adventure. Don't regret it, since those high peaks were something I wanted to do as personal goals, and don't chastise anyone who want to do something similar. These days I spend more time in new areas where I've never been (and hoof up a few lower peaks :) if they're in the area ); new sights/sounds help bring all your senses 'alive' and keep 'em sharp.
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Re: Measuring your achievements

Postby Grampahawk » Fri Mar 11, 2011 9:58 pm

There's a line from "Three Kings" where The character played by George Clooney is telling a recruit how to get through his fears. Clooney says, "You do the thing that you are afraid of, and later on you have time to be scared", or something like that. For me, accomplishment comes from doing somthing that forces you into your "uncomfort zone". As we get older we do this less unfortunately.
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Re: Measuring your achievements

Postby asmrz » Sat Mar 12, 2011 12:05 am

A good friend once told me after we failed on a really big line way down south in Patagonia: "When you and I are 80 and sitting on a deck looking at sunset, supreme achievement in all of this will be "Not having any regrets". If you and I don't have to say to each other "we should have" WE HAVE ACHIEVED...I think that is a good lesson.
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Re: Measuring your achievements

Postby RickF » Wed Apr 20, 2011 6:14 pm

Grampahawk wrote:There's a line from "Three Kings" where The character played by George Clooney is telling a recruit how to get through his fears. Clooney says, "You do the thing that you are afraid of, and later on you have time to be scared", or something like that. For me, accomplishment comes from doing somthing that forces you into your "uncomfort zone". As we get older we do this less unfortunately.


Excellent Point G-Hawk. People who push themselves beyond the boundaries of their comfort zones grow in mind, body and spirit. Whether we succeed or fail, our lives are enriched by the challenges. This applies to life in general not just mountaineering and climbing. I don't know who to credit for the quote "nothing ventured, nothing gained" but it makes perfect sense.
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Re: Measuring your achievements

Postby RickF » Wed Apr 20, 2011 6:37 pm

I have to agree the ideal of setting goals and measuring achievement is personal and is different for everyone. Me personally, I'm a goal setter. I learned as a young adult that if don't set a goal I tend to stay in my comfort zone, or in other words, no goal; no action. I understand this isn't the same for everbody, some internally motivated people are just wired to go, go, go. Without goals, I on the other hand will stay in my comfort zone as a couch potato.

When I acheive a goal I don't feel disapointment or let down by the anti-climax, I get a huge release of endorphins. I have to be careful because sometimes there's so many endorphins bouncing around in the aftermath that I set a new grandiose goal.

I don't just enjoy the end game or the achievement. Setting a goal motivates me to work toward it. I enjoy the whole journey. In the case of picking a new peak to summit, the planning, training, getting gear, and coordinating with partners is all a part of the process. The intensity of the enjoyment definitely increases when I get on the route.

The harder the goal is, the sweeter it is when I finally achieve it. For a variety of reasons I don't always make it to the summit on my first attempt. The peaks that take me two or three attemps feel like the most epic achievements.
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Re: Measuring your achievements

Postby JHH60 » Wed Apr 20, 2011 6:41 pm

Grampahawk wrote:There's a line from "Three Kings" where The character played by George Clooney is telling a recruit how to get through his fears. Clooney says, "You do the thing that you are afraid of, and later on you have time to be scared", or something like that. For me, accomplishment comes from doing somthing that forces you into your "uncomfort zone". As we get older we do this less unfortunately.


My definition of accomplishment would be slightly different. I feel like I've accomplished something if I start doing something and feel pretty uncomfortable, but work on it until I feel comfortable and competent. Sometimes that occurs at an easily identifiable, even dramatic moment, like when I realize that a particular piece of gear is giving me problems, I change it, and then everything seems to be a lot easier and tasks just fall into place rather than being a struggle. Other times I realize that after a couple years and thousands of hours of practicing something, that something I had thought was hard, required a lot of mental energy, and that I approached with fear or uncertainty, is now easy and requires little thought. I think those latter kinds of moments are the ones where I sometimes feel a letdown, because there is no dramatic "Aha!" moment.
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Re: Measuring your achievements

Postby lcarreau » Wed Apr 20, 2011 7:20 pm

I wish I had more Aha Moments, instead of my pets ...

Image
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