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Texan requests helicopter rescue from Mt. St. Helens

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Re: Texan requests helicopter rescue from Mt. St. Helens

Postby simonov » Mon Aug 12, 2013 5:57 pm

surgent wrote:Regarding the tax-payer comment: rescues are part of the mandate of every county sheriff (or equivalent agency). The tax=payer gets stuck with the bill far more often for the usual day-to-day crime than with the occasional rescue, and furthermore, most rescue teams are composed of volunteers who buy their own gear, and who get paid nothing by the sheriff. County SAR teams are one of the best values for the dollar you'll find anywhere.


I know this thread is now devoted to pigfighting and trolling, but . . .

As it has been explained to me regarding helicopter rescues in Los Angeles or San Bernardino counties, they actually cost the taxpayer nothing. The choppers and their crews need to fly a certain number of hours per month to maintain their certification; so if they aren't out there rescuing people, they will be out there anyway practicing rescuing people. That's what I'm told, anyway.

But the biggest problem with helicopter rescues, regardless of who is paying for it, is choppers are crazy dangerous and unsafe. Never set foot in one unless you have to.
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Re: Texan requests helicopter rescue from Mt. St. Helens

Postby peninsula » Mon Aug 12, 2013 10:15 pm

I had an experience that will support some of what has been said regarding SAR operations. My mother-in-law has alzheimer's and is under the care of 24/7 home-health care providers. One of the newer nurses over reacted to a situation and called 911 when she could not reach my wife. By the time my wife was contacted, an ambulance was on location to take her mom to the hospital, which we objected to once we understood the situation that had provoked the call. However, the head fellow with the ambulance said he could not comply with our request as once the paramedics were in a home responding to someone deemed potentially in need of emergency care, regardless of what we said, they had to take the victim to an emergency room (Where she inevitably racked up a huge and unnecessary medical bill!) I was kind of floored when my over-the-phone demands where ignored. We were told we can overturn an emergency responder if a similar situation were to recur only if we had a doctor's signed authorization on premise providing the likes of my wife's objections to be enforced. We now have that authorization.

Beware before initiating any sort of medical emergency for yourself or on someone else's behalf! That should go without saying, but I'm just saying.
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Re: Texan requests helicopter rescue from Mt. St. Helens

Postby mattyj » Mon Aug 12, 2013 10:39 pm

peninsula wrote:Beware before initiating any sort of medical emergency for yourself or on someone else's behalf! That should go without saying, but I'm just saying.


I think you're walking away with the wrong lessons from this incident. If you have reason to believe there's a medical emergency, call 911. Better to call soon and have help on scene than not have it when you need it.

If an epileptic has a seizure in a grocery store, that store isn't going to hesitate to call 911. When the patient recovers, they can and generally will tell the ambulance crew that they're just fine, and - signed doctor's note or not - the crew will leave. They have no ability to treat or transport a patient against consent, and typically do not bill unless someone gets transported, even if it was the patient who initiated the 911 call.

If your mother in law were mentally competent and told the paramedics to leave, they would have, doctor's note or no. The problem with your situation is that you / your wife, as a third party, had no legal authority to be making medical decisions for your MIL. Put yourself in the paramedic's shoes. Say he leaves and something bad happens to your MIL. Your wife's sister (and maybe she doesn't have one, but how can the paramedic know that?) then sues the ambulance company for failing to provide care. What's he going to say, "oh it's okay someone on the phone told me to leave her alone"? Those family situations happen all the time, and they can get real ugly - e.g. Terry Schiavo.
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Re: Texan requests helicopter rescue from Mt. St. Helens

Postby mrchad9 » Mon Aug 12, 2013 10:50 pm

^^^^
That makes sense!
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Re: Texan requests helicopter rescue from Mt. St. Helens

Postby Josh Lewis » Mon Aug 12, 2013 11:32 pm

mattyj wrote:If an epileptic has a seizure in a grocery store, that store isn't going to hesitate to call 911.


I've seen one once in my life in a restaurant. No one called 911. :wink: However my climbing partner dashed to the scene to make sure he was okay. Eventually he was able to get up. We were all shocked. Even if it was life threatening I don't own a cell phone. :?
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