Welcome to SP!  -
Areas & RangesMountains & RocksRoutesImagesArticlesTrip ReportsGearOtherPeoplePlans & PartnersWhat's NewForum

The importance of a tent

Post climbing gear-related questions, offer advice. For classifieds, please use that forum.
 

Postby Diego Sahagún » Sat Feb 17, 2007 4:20 pm

desainme wrote:Wild Country and Terra Nova make some tents and they are in Europe. I bought their Solar Tent and it withstood a trememdous rainstorm in Ohio. I have had in the yard in the snow at 0 F I think that tent manufacturers in England are inclined toward good waterproofing since the place is so wet. http://www.summitpostgear.com/image/1717/779/solar-tent.html


I'd prefer something stronger than it though weight would be a little more, something even good for the snow. A two person double wall tent would be good. Also I'd like an inside space large enough to put two big backpacks. It should be strong, waterproof and wind resistant. Weight is not as important for us though we don't want a 3 person wide tent
User Avatar
Diego Sahagún

 
Posts: 14494
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2001 6:21 pm
Location: Madrid, Spain
Thanked: 552 times in 502 posts

Postby Kiefer » Sat Feb 17, 2007 6:41 pm

Starting out, many moons ago, I used to think carrying a tent was THE most important piece of 'furniture' one could take on backcountry excursions. My opinions have since changed. I have three tents now, winter, summer and a bivy, all Marmot. 70% of the time, I now use my bivy and relay on my bag for warmth and wind protection. Also saves on weight. This summer, I'll probably (realistically speaking) start ditching my bivy in favour of a tarp and sturdier bag. So far, at least in the last 3 seasons of doing this (bivy only), I've had a great time. Amazing how much more energetic one feels when they're not carrying a 5-6lb. tent!
Problem is, espacially in Colorado, tempertures drop quickly when the sun goes down. Of course, it's all relevent upon where one lives and one's tolerance for colder temperatures.
I only mentioned Marmot earlier because I've NEVER had a problem with their equip. IMO, they make one of the best products out there. And that's 15+ years of experience talking.
Good luck on your tent-hunting endevour!

BTW, I NEVER leave home or my truck without a water purifier of some kind. I may forget food (done that) or a torch (done that) or even a jacket (stupidly, done that) :x but I'll never forget my purifier.
User Avatar
Kiefer

 
Posts: 530
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 1:30 pm
Location: Estes Park, Colorado, United States
Thanked: 116 times in 65 posts

Postby damio » Tue Feb 20, 2007 1:26 pm

Diego Sahagún wrote:We need an all-season tent for two; hard, waterproof and light. Those marks (aside North face) are not sold here. Wich North face tent :?: Any answer from Europe :?:


From EU...

I have a North Face 'West Wind' model for two people. I think it is only marketed in Europe.

+ Really sturdy in high wind, I feel very confident in it, no matter what the weather.
+ Easy to pitch.
+ nice gold colour
+ It was included in the "Field Manual for the United States Antarctic Program", 1999. What ever that is (I just stumbled across it in Google). See chapter 11. The manual makes for nice reading!
http://www.sarinfo.bc.ca/Library/Skills ... rvival.skl

- Perhaps a bit heavy unless you really need the robustness that it offers (2.5kg)
- Doesn't have a very good cooking annex
- Creates condensation like a veritable condenser (but perhaps so do all similar tents?)
- Rain water and condensation drips into the tent door when opening the fly annex from inside (its kind of hard to explain what I mean)
- Like a baking oven in windless sunny conditions, especially summer. To be expected so not really a negative.

http://www.snowandrock.com/shop/activit ... /MNFCV.htm

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/the-nort ... escription
User Avatar
damio

 
Posts: 91
Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2007 6:28 pm
Location: Germany
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Postby Diego Sahagún » Thu Feb 22, 2007 12:11 am

Adventurer, EV2 seems a very good tent though I'm looking for something half the prize of it. Anyway, gracias
User Avatar
Diego Sahagún

 
Posts: 14494
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2001 6:21 pm
Location: Madrid, Spain
Thanked: 552 times in 502 posts

Postby Diego Sahagún » Thu Feb 22, 2007 12:21 am

damio wrote:
Diego Sahagún wrote:We need an all-season tent for two; hard, waterproof and light. Those marks (aside North face) are not sold here. Wich North face tent :?: Any answer from Europe :?:


From EU...

I have a North Face 'West Wind' model for two people. I think it is only marketed in Europe.

+ Really sturdy in high wind, I feel very confident in it, no matter what the weather.
+ Easy to pitch.
+ nice gold colour
+ It was included in the "Field Manual for the United States Antarctic Program", 1999. What ever that is (I just stumbled across it in Google). See chapter 11. The manual makes for nice reading!
http://www.sarinfo.bc.ca/Library/Skills ... rvival.skl

- Perhaps a bit heavy unless you really need the robustness that it offers (2.5kg)
- Doesn't have a very good cooking annex
- Creates condensation like a veritable condenser (but perhaps so do all similar tents?)
- Rain water and condensation drips into the tent door when opening the fly annex from inside (its kind of hard to explain what I mean)
- Like a baking oven in windless sunny conditions, especially summer. To be expected so not really a negative.

http://www.snowandrock.com/shop/activit ... /MNFCV.htm

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/the-nort ... escription


Well, this is like the tent we look for. Though I don't like the colour, we'd prefer something less bright. Regarding wind resistance. Is it as sturdy as you say :?:

- Doesn't have a very good cooking annex
- Creates condensation like a veritable condenser (but perhaps so do all similar tents?)


Cooking annex seems big enough. Condensation is really a problem on similar tents
User Avatar
Diego Sahagún

 
Posts: 14494
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2001 6:21 pm
Location: Madrid, Spain
Thanked: 552 times in 502 posts

Tents.

Postby Aksel » Thu Feb 22, 2007 4:55 pm

I much prefer nordic tents beacuse erecting those tents are much faster.The TNF tents all require you to put up the inner tent first and then adding the fly afterwards.Also i find them heavy compared to the size and sturdiness they offer.I recommend looking into tents from hilleberg or Hell-sport.
User Avatar
Aksel

 
Posts: 86
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2005 8:52 am
Location: Norway
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Postby ksolem » Thu Feb 22, 2007 5:33 pm

Sometimes I think "I don't need no stinkin' tent.

Image

Image

But then there are those other times:

Image

That's an old N Face 4 season tent I really wish they still made. Much lighter than the new line.
User Avatar
ksolem

 
Posts: 5719
Joined: Tue May 13, 2003 4:25 pm
Location: Monrovia, California, United States
Thanked: 12 times in 9 posts

Postby oldsnowy » Thu Feb 22, 2007 6:20 pm

I got a bit of "tent advice" a long time ago that has served me well, as follows: "The best two person, four season tent is a three person tent". Sure, I'm not keen on the bit of extra weight but hunkered down in wild weather in any season sure makes that extra storage, cribbage playing, and sock drying space pretty nice.
User Avatar
oldsnowy

 
Posts: 75
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2004 12:40 am
Location: Portland, Oregon, United States
Thanked: 1 time in 1 post

Postby damio » Thu Feb 22, 2007 9:00 pm

I hope the info helped in your search.

- Cooking annex: Yes, I agree - it is big enough and it is has a low
profile for windy days. However it is not easily 'raised' for more room on
less windy days. Also, from condensation on the inside of the fly sheet
you can get wet each morning when you crawl out of the tent as your back
can rub on the inside of the annex unless you are careful.

- Colour: I also prefer an earth or tree coloured tent. However this gold
tent makes the interior quite bright - nice on a dark mornings.

- Wind resistance: if you get the pegs into good firm ground then yes, it
is a very solid tent. I have tested it (stupidly) on the edge of a cliff
at about 2500m and it handled the blasting storm very well. Keep in mind
that I have not tested it extensively in a lot of mountain storms nor am I
able to compare to other tents of a similar type. I had it in 50kph winds
with gusts of perhaps 70-80kph. 80kph is the tested maximum in a wind
tunnel (according the TNF marketing info).
User Avatar
damio

 
Posts: 91
Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2007 6:28 pm
Location: Germany
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Postby Luciano136 » Thu Feb 22, 2007 9:22 pm

In winter, yes on a tent. It is so much warmer!!
User Avatar
Luciano136

 
Posts: 3734
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:46 pm
Location: Huntington Beach, California, United States
Thanked: 9 times in 8 posts

Postby rasgoat » Thu Feb 22, 2007 10:43 pm

The Hilleberg Nallo 2GT really rocks.

It is very light for a tent it's size, double wall, and very easy to set up.
The versatility is endless, there are many different ways the tent can be set up for many different situations.

The vestibule is huge, great for two peoples gear and cooking too.
I have used it in winter and love it!

I believe a tent is very important, especially here in the northeast USA where the humidity in the air gets into your bones! It really does raise the temperature inside, making for a better sleep, and also protects your gear from getting wet.
User Avatar
rasgoat

 
Posts: 789
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2006 12:55 am
Location: Denver, Colorado, United States
Thanked: 7 times in 6 posts

Postby Diego Sahagún » Fri Feb 23, 2007 1:04 am

rasgoat, I don't think that they sell Hilleberg in Spain
User Avatar
Diego Sahagún

 
Posts: 14494
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2001 6:21 pm
Location: Madrid, Spain
Thanked: 552 times in 502 posts

Postby ksolem » Fri Feb 23, 2007 1:49 am

The SP member called The Chief has a Hilleberg tent. We took it up last August when we climbed the North Buttress of Merriam Peak. As it turned out we did not even need the tent, but I slept in it anyway, and got a sense of it. Very light, very spacious, great vestibule. A tad hard to ventilate. Anyone had those up in high winds? It seems like it would be flimsy compared to it's heavier counterparts from TNF etc., but I can't say from any experience.
User Avatar
ksolem

 
Posts: 5719
Joined: Tue May 13, 2003 4:25 pm
Location: Monrovia, California, United States
Thanked: 12 times in 9 posts

Postby Moni » Fri Feb 23, 2007 1:59 am

Fred and I have the Clip Flashlight tent from Sierra Designs. Goes up quickly, is very sturdy and weighs very little.

The last time I slept totally in the open (not that it bothers me) I had a chipmunk move in with me (we got along just fine) but I ended up wet from dew. We have had animal problems on other occasions and a tent seems to be the best solution (except for bears).

In summer just spanning a tarp to keep off the dew is fine, but wind and the unexpected thunderstorm make a tent very nice. During the other seasons I consider a tent even more important. Snow caves are fine, but the time and energy it takes to build one are often easily offset by carrying a tent.
User Avatar
Moni

 
Posts: 2242
Joined: Mon Aug 12, 2002 11:15 am
Location: Spokane, Washington, United States
Thanked: 4 times in 3 posts

Postby bandguy » Fri Feb 23, 2007 2:13 am

Tent for sure.

BUT don't waste your money on a $200-500 tent. Go to your local super sized sports store. For me it's a Gander Mountain, Dicks, Target, not REI. Look for a 4x6', 2 pole pop up tent. You should find one on sale for about 29.99 (USA) Get a $4.99 bottle of seam sealer. Soak it down. Good to go.

I've had expensive and cheap tents. They all leak a with a hard rain 6-8 hours rain. Save your money.

For winter camping....Tents knock the wind chill off, but not the actual temp....

Best bet with your girlfriend.. Day hike (winter time) and sleep at night in the back off your full size SUV. Start it up every 6 hours. It's about 20 degrees warming then a tent. She will appreciate it.

Have fun.
User Avatar
bandguy

 
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Dec 23, 2006 4:13 pm
Location: Minnetonka, Minnesota, United States
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

PreviousNext

Return to Gear

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

© 2006-2013 SummitPost.org. All Rights Reserved.