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DeanUntitled Comment

Dean

Voted 10/10

Hey, neat page and very timely. I'm planning on hitting Gardner and No. Gardner this summer and it looks like Abernathy could be included via the Gardner Meadows approach .
Posted Jan 13, 2004 5:11 pm

KlenkeUntitled Comment

Klenke

Hasn't voted

Oh, easily. If you had time, a good option is to scramble up Abernathy on Day 1 after setting up camp. On Day 2, climb directly up Gardner then run the arcing ridge over to N. Gardner, returning to camp via the south-facing basin coming off Pt. 8487. Day 3: hike out. Or, if you didn't do Abernathy on Day 1, do it on the morning of Day 3 before hiking out.
Posted Jan 13, 2004 5:20 pm

rpcUntitled Comment

rpc

Voted 10/10

Nice page(s, both of the new ones). Enjoying the photos.
Posted Jan 13, 2004 5:59 pm

desainmeUntitled Comment

desainme

Voted 10/10

Another good page on Abernathy Peak south of Silver Star Mountain. Access is via Methow valley a rather long NW Se valley. Can be climbed with the nearly 9000' Gardner Peak.
Posted Jan 13, 2004 9:41 pm

Brian JenkinsUntitled Comment

Brian Jenkins

Voted 10/10

Another excellent page as usual.
Posted Jan 13, 2004 11:34 pm

Jerry LUntitled Comment

Jerry L

Voted 10/10

Nice page with some very useful information.
Posted Jan 14, 2004 5:33 am

DigglerUntitled Comment

Diggler

Voted 10/10

Nicely done page! What is "standard wilderness policy" in Washington, though? Are permits required? If so, where would I get them?
Posted Jan 14, 2004 3:14 pm

KlenkeUntitled Comment

Klenke

Hasn't voted

I guess "standard wilderness policy" can seem a bit vague. What I mean by that is the leave no trace and no motors ethic (i.e., no snowmobiles and no chainsaws).



In general, the wildernesses in WA do not require permits in the sense that they have to be reserved. A lot are just ones you fill out at the trailhead register box. Really popular other places like the Enchantments do have overnight permit limits to keep the crowds down. These permits are typically reserved many months in advance (see here). Then, of course, there is a limit to the number of permits to go up Mt. Rainier (but that's a national park).
Posted Jan 14, 2004 7:21 pm

GrantUntitled Comment

Grant

Voted 10/10

Very nice route descriptions, where do I find the Wash. to 100 peaks list.



Posted Jan 14, 2004 9:37 pm

KlenkeUntitled Comment

Klenke

Hasn't voted

Try this: Top 100 list comparison.



I go by the Bulger Top 100 mainly as it has historical precedent, but Roper & Howbert's list has value too. Their list cleans up the peculiarities present in the Bulger list.
Posted Jan 14, 2004 10:18 pm

GrantUntitled Comment

Grant

Voted 10/10

Wow, thanks for the link. More than three-quarters are 8,000 foot peaks. I'm sure they are much more difficult than the top 100 Colorado peaks, due to glaciers and such.
Posted Jan 14, 2004 11:53 pm

GMatthewsUntitled Comment

GMatthews

Voted 10/10

Good Job
Posted May 13, 2004 3:07 pm

Lee StammUntitled Comment

Lee Stamm

Voted 10/10

Nice job, as on all of your pages. The area between the upper Twisp and Methow rivers is kind of under-appreciated. Glad to see you giving it some coverage.
Posted Sep 13, 2004 5:15 pm

jenniferdenoyaUntitled Comment

jenniferdenoya

Voted 10/10

High quality stuff : )
Posted Dec 6, 2004 6:43 am

KlenkeUntitled Comment

Klenke

Hasn't voted

I notice you're looking at a lot of my mountain pages. Are you stalking my mountains?
Posted Dec 6, 2004 1:51 pm

jenniferdenoyaUntitled Comment

jenniferdenoya

Voted 10/10

You wish I would stalk your mountains. : ) No, I'm looking at various pages, state by state (unless they appear on What's New). Promise not to laugh!?! I'm trying to map out the next two years of climbing in the life of jennifer barnes. : )
Posted Dec 6, 2004 6:06 pm

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