Welcome to SP!  -
Construction Components
Custom Object

Construction Components

 

Page Type: Custom Object

Object Type: Construction Page- Components

Object Title: Construction Components

 

Page By: mrchad9

Created/Edited: Nov 6, 2011 / Jan 28, 2013

Object ID: 758452

Hits: 978 

Page Score: 72.08%  - 2 Votes 

Vote: Log in to vote

 

Picture Settings

Standard:

Enlarge
Mount Senger Summit Vista (click to view labeled peaks)



Substituted Image:

Enlarge
A bee has its way with an alpine gold above Chamberlain Lake on Mount Hooper



Cropped:

Enlarge
Seven Gables from Little Bear Lake

Tables

Black:

RouteTrailhead (Quota Area)DifficultyDistance (one way)Elevation Gain
North Slope via Green LakeSouth Lake (Baker and Green Lakes)Class 25.0 miles4200 feet + 600 feet on return
East Ridge via Seventh LakeGlacier Lodge (Big Pine North Fork)Class 28.6 miles6000 feet + 200 feet on return
East Ridge via Baker LakesBaker Lake (Baker and Green Lakes)Class 23.5 miles3200 feet + negligible gain on return
West Chute via Chocolate LakesSouth Lake (Bishop Pass)Class 33.5 miles3600 feet + negligible gain on return


Green/Gray:

RouteDistanceGainDescription
Lake Edison13.1 miles one-way6600 feet
+1200 feet on return
Lake Edison marks the standard starting point from the west, and the route can be shortened (only marginally) by beginning at the Bear Creek Diversion Dam (four wheel drive required). From the southeastern shore of the lake (near the dam) follow the Bear Ridge trail up and over Bear Ridge, meeting the John Muir Trail after 5 miles. The John Muir Trail descends through the forest to reach Bear Creek 6.8 miles from the trailhead. Most of the route follows Bear Creek, but note the crossing of the Hilgard Branch (8.7 miles in) and especially Bear Creek (9.9 miles in) can sometimes be challenging during the peak runoff of heavy snow years. After the trail crosses Bear Creek ascends one mile in the direction of Marie Lake and Selden Pass, but take the left fork at a junction to head east to Sandpiper Lake. From the southern shore of Sandpiper Lake you can climb the northwest slope/west ridge, or continue further to reach the south slope.
Florence Lake17.4 miles one-way7100 feet
+1500 feet on return
From the Florence Lake Trailhead wrap around the southwest side of Florence Lake and cross its inlet via a footbridge after 3.6 miles. After 8 miles pass the Muir Trail Ranch and soon turn left (north) at a junction towards Selden Pass and eventually onto the John Muir Trail. The trail begins a steep ascent before easing at Sallie Keyes Lakes. Continue north over Selden Pass and leave the trail at the southern side of Marie Lake to wrap around the east side of the lake. After passing the north end of the ridge to your right (east), contour cross-country northwest to Sandpiper Lake at the base of Seven Gables.
Florence Lake Ferry13.7 miles one-way6700 feet
+1100 feet on return
If the timing works for your party it is possible to take the ferry across Florence Lake, saving the effort of walking around the southwestern shoreline. The ferry operates several times each day in season (generally early June to late September. For the most current information, check the Florence Lake Ferry Service website. From the east shore of Florence Lake, follow the remaining route description above.
Italy Pass/Pine Creek14.7 miles one-way7400 feet
+1900 feet on return
Italy Pass is a very reasonable alternative for those on the east side of the Sierra, with a much easier drive but more cross-country travel. Follow the trail as it switchbacks to Pine Lakes, bearing right beyond the lakes to Honeymoon Lake and Granite Park. In Granite Park the trail eventually fades away about 800 feet below Italy Pass. Continue cross-county over the pass immediately south of Mount Julius Caesar. Once over the pass, traverse southeast to White Bear Lake (and a half dozen other lakes with bear inspired names) and make a gradual descent via Vee Lake to Seven Gables Lakes at the base of Seven Gables below its steep eastern face.



Blue:

RouteDistanceGainDescription
Deer Cove Trailhead10.7 miles one-way7,700 feet
+700 feet on return
The Deer Cove Trailhead is a popular option for overnight outings, as it lies outside the national park boundary and is not subject to quota restrictions. The trail begins in forest, passing Deer Cove Creek after 1.8 miles at elevation 5600 feet. The area around Deer Cove Saddle has been affected by forest fire, and as a result the views here tend to be more open. Continue on the main trail past Wildman Meadow (which has an established horse camp) until reaching Frypan Meadow 6.5 miles from the trailhead at 7800 feet. Keep right at Frypan Meadow, following the trail to Kennedy Pass where a short and very scenic class 2 scramble takes you along the southeast ridge to the summit.
Lewis Creek Trailhead10.3 miles one-way7,700 feet
+850 feet on return
Lewis Creek is a similar option, though less open to views than the approach from Deer Cove. There are two creek crossings en route that may require wading or determination during the peak spring runoff (Comb Creek 3.3 miles from the trailhead at 6100 feet, and Lewis Creek 4.5 miles from the trailhead at 6700 feet). After 6.1 miles the trail reaches Frypan Meadow, joining the route described above from Deer Cove.



Yellow:

RouteTrailhead (Quota Area)DifficultyDistance (one way)Elevation Gain
North Slope via Green LakeSouth Lake (Baker and Green Lakes)Class 25.0 miles4200 feet + 600 feet on return
East Ridge via Seventh LakeGlacier Lodge (Big Pine North Fork)Class 28.6 miles6000 feet + 200 feet on return
East Ridge via Baker LakesBaker Lake (Baker and Green Lakes)Class 23.5 miles3200 feet + negligible gain on return
West Chute via Chocolate LakesSouth Lake (Bishop Pass)Class 33.5 miles3600 feet + negligible gain on return

Route Table

Northwest Slope / West Ridge – Class 2-3
The northwest slope of Seven Gables is essentially a class 2 slog, a bit sandy as you bear left and more talus closer to the ridge on the right. Depart the trail at the eastern shore of Sandpiper Lake south of the stream coming down the large bowl northwest of the summit. There is a short section of thick brush, not very consequential when on the descent but tougher when on the ascent. Nearer the summit there are a few easy and unexposed class moves, no real routefinding involved.
South Slope – Class 3
From the east the south slope is reached by traversing from the saddle with Gemini, descending about 100 feet as you approach the southern aspect of the peak. From the west the slope is easily gained from the unnamed lakes east of Medley Lake. Climb one of the class 3 chutes through the short, gray cliff bands at the base of the slope to the class 2 scree and talus field above (there are several viable routes though the band). Climb 1000 feet further to a knife edge ridge overlooking the sheer east face. Follow the ridge left (west) on the unexposed south side until it is possible to cross over a second intersecting ridge and into a chute on the west side of the mountain. Descend this chute about 40 feet to a class 3 chimney that then ascends 100 feet to a wall just beneath the summit and against the dropoff to the east. During my trip I didn't descend quite far enough and instead climbed a class 4 face adjacent to the chimney (the choice available is between a somewhat exposed, solid, class 4 face and a less exposed, loose, class 3 chute). From the impass below the summit wrap clockwise around to the west and then to the north side of the summit, passing over (not under as Secor mentions) a very obvious overhanging block which is visible during most of the final portion of the climb.
North Ridge – Class 2-3
The north ridge begins at the saddle immedately north of Seven Gables, easily approached from the west. If approaching from the east the saddle is most easily reached on its north side. From the saddle, continue to the summit, with less technical terrain to the right and a few class 3 moves available closer to the ridge.
East Face – Class 4
This route ascends the north side of the east face and tops out 200 feet north of the summit. There are class 4 sections both at the beginning and end of the route, with mostly class 3 terrian between. If you have additional content to add please summit a route page or send the information to me and I can include it here.

Trailheads

Deer Cove Trailhead (36.80385° N, 118.71378° W)
Turn east off Highway 99 in Fresno onto Highway 180 towards Kings Canyon National Park. Simply follow Highway 180 for 84 miles to reach the trailhead (29 miles past the park entrance and 1.7 miles past Grizzly Falls). Take care not to miss the left turn 21 miles from Highway 99 to stay on 180. If coming from the south, Highway 180 is best reached by using Highway 137 or 198 to connect to Highway 63 northbound in Visalia.

Lewis Creek Trailhead (36.80021° N, 118.69059° W)
Follow the directions above to Deer Cove Trailhead, but continue another 1.4 miles east to reach Lewis Creek.

South Lake Trailhead (37.16928° N, 118.56568° W)
Turn west off Highway 395 in Bishop onto Highway 168 (W Line Street) towards Lake Sabrina. Follow Highway 168 for 15 miles to the well marked intersection with South Lake Road. Follow the road to South Lake for 7 miles to the parking area at the end of the road.

Glacier Lodge (37.12545° N, 118.43714° W)
Turn west off Highway 395 in Big Pine onto Glacier Lodge Road (W Crocker Street) and follow it 10.5 miles directly to the trailhead parking area at the end. There is a small lot for day use, but if full or going on an overnight trip you'll need to use the backpackers' lot 3/4 mile down the road.

North Lake Trailhead (37.23054° N, 118.61893° W)
Turn west off Highway 395 in Bishop onto Highway 168 (W Line Street) towards Lake Sabrina. Follow Highway 168 for 18 miles to the well marked intersection with North Lake Road. After 1.6 miles on North Lake Road, turn right into the trailhead parking area near the pack station (signs here state that continuing straight is for North Lake Campground traffic only).

Pine Creek Trailhead (37.36110° N, 118.69184° W)
Turn west onto Pine Creek Road off Highway 395 approximately 10 miles northwest of Bishop (28 miles south of the Highway 203 intersection to Mammoth Lakes). Follow Pine Creek Road 10 miles west to the trailhead parking area.

Crown Valley Trailhead (36.95849° N, 118.96801° W)
Three miles past Wishon Reservoir bear right at the fork in the road. Continue on McKinley Grove Road another 1 mile to the trailhead.

Rancheria Trailhead (36.97548° N, 118.95607° W)
Three miles past Wishon Reservoir bear left at the fork in the road. 1.7 miles from the fork turn left and pass an open gate. As you pass the gate the pavement ends and you reach the trailhead 2.3 miles from McKinley Grove Road. There are bear boxes (but no facilities) and ample space for parking and camping at the trailhead.

Spanish OHV Route (36.95069° N, 118.96741° W)
Three miles past Wishon Reservoir bear right at the fork in the road. Continue on McKinley Grove Road another 1.7 miles to the beginning of the OHV route. The OHV portion is another 5 miles will take up to another 2 hours to complete each way. The coordinates listed above are for the beginning of the OHV Route.

Taboose Pass Trailhead (37.0094° N, 118.3272° W)
Turn west off highway 395 onto Taboose Creek Road (12 miles south of Big Pine and 14 miles north of Independence). The road quickly turns to graded dirt. Continue following the main road, which turns right at intersections 1.7 miles and 3.7 miles from 395. The trailhead is at the end of the road 5.5 miles from 395 at 5425 ft. There are no facilities at the trailhead, but Taboose Creek is very close and available for water and rinsing.

Florence Lake (37.27671° N, 118.97660° W)
From the Central Valley make your way towards Prather and continue east on Highway 168 towards Shaver Lake and then Huntington Lake, following the obvious road signs. At Huntington Lake, turn right onto well designated Kaiser Pass Road and follow it another 17 miles to an intersection where the road splits to Lake Edison. Instead of turning to Lake Edison, continue straight here for another 6 miles to Florence Lake.

Hooper Creek Diversion Dam (37.30573° N, 118.95029° W)
Due to the crossing of the Florence Lake outlet on this route, a high clearance vehicle is recommended for this trailhead, although in fall it may be possible to make it with a low clearance vehicle. A 4x4 is not necessary. The OHV road isn’t very long, and if needed walking the off pavement portion adds only a couple of miles at most. Follow the directions above to Florence Lake, but a quarter mile before reaching the lake turn left at the signed intersection towards Jackass Meadow and the Hooper Diversion OHV Road. In less than a mile the pavement ends as you turn left onto the OHV road. Follow the OHV road as it crosses the outlet of Florence Lake and bear right at an intersection 1.8 miles from the beginning of the OHV road. The road ends at the Hooper Diversion Dam about 2.2 miles from the start.

Lake Edison (37.36735° N, 118.98340° W)
Follow the directions mentioned above from Prather to Florence Lake, turning left at the intersection 17 miles after Huntington Lake towards Lake Edison. Follow the road another 6 miles to Lake Edison. Alternatively, the Bear Creek Diversion Dam trailhead can be used, turn right onto the OHV road 3 miles from the turnoff to Lake Edison and follow it 2 miles to the diversion dam (four wheel drive is necessary).

Onion Valley (36.77247° N, 118.34091° W)
Turn west off Highway 395 in the center of Independence onto Onion Valley Road (also labeled Market Street). Follow Onion Valley Road 13 paved miles to reach the trailhead at the end of the road.

Roads End (36.79616° N, 118.58342° W)
Turn east off Highway 99 in Fresno onto Highway 180 towards Kings Canyon National Park. Simply follow the highway 92 miles all the way to Roads End in the back of the canyon (37 miles past the park entrance). Take care not to miss the left turn 21 miles from Highway 99 to stay on 180. If coming from the south, Highway 180 is best reached by using Highway 137 or 198 to connect to Highway 63 northbound in Visalia.

Mono/Parker Pass Trail (37.89079° N, 119.26236° W)
From either the east or the west, follow Highway 120 to Yosemite National Park directly to the trailhead (1.4 miles west of Tioga Pass and 5.6 miles east of Tuolumne Meadows Campground).

Lyell Canyon (37.87790° N, 119.33873° W)
Follow Highway 120 into Yosemite National Park until reaching Tuolumne Meadows Lodge Road near Lembert Dome (6 miles west of Tioga Pass and 0.5 miles east of Tuolumne Meadows Campground). Signs here mark the location of the wilderness permit ranger station. You can either park at the ranger station, or continue down the road another 0.4 miles to the large trailhead parking area on the left.

Rush Creek (37.78316° N, 119.12685° W)
From 395 between Lee Vining and Mammoth, turn west on Highway 158/June Lake Loop and continue to the large trailhead parking area opposite Silver Lake at the lake’s north end. The trailhead is located 8.7 miles from the 158/395 north junction and 7.1 miles from 395 if using the southern junction.

Jerkey Meadow Trailhead (36.16714° N, 118.48564° W)
From the north take exit 65A from Highway 99 in Earlimart to follow County Road J22/Sierra Avenue/Avenue 56 east. Continue straight for 40 miles, followed by a left turn on M-504/Parker Pass Road. After 12 miles pass straight through a four-way stop, and turn left after another 6.5 miles onto 22S82. Follow 22S82 20 miles to the trailhead at the end of the road. From the south follow Sierra Way/M-99 from Kernville 24 miles north to the intersection with 22S82, and turn right to follow it 20 miles to the trailhead.

Lewis Camp Trailhead (36.18164° N, 118.51534° W)
From the north take exit 76 from Highway 99 in Tipton to follow Highway 190 east. After 56 miles where Highway 190 becomes M-90, take a left turn onto 21S50. Follow for 4.6 miles and take a right onto 20S79 and follow signs a short distance to the trailhead. If coming from Kernville in the south follow Sierra Way/M-99 31 miles north an intersection with M-90, and turn right. Follow M-90 for 15.4 miles and turn right again onto 21S50 at the junction with Highway 190.

Mineral King (36.45277° N, 118.59583° W)
In Visalia exit Highway 99 and head east on Highway 198 toward Sequoia National Park. After 39 miles turn right on Mineral King road shortly after the town of Three Rivers. Follow Mineral King road 23 miles to its end.

Route Summary (no table)

Trip statistics from Racetrack Road:
3.1 miles one-way, 4100 feet elevation gain out with negligible gain on the return

To begin hike over.......

Etymology

“Although tin ore has been found in varying amounts in several localities in the state, the name has been applied sparingly. Tin Mine Canyon and Creek are found in Riverside Co., and Tin Mountain in Death Valley NP.” – Erwin Gudde, William Bright, California Place Names (2004)

"The mountain was called 'Sheep Mountain' on the Olancha 30' map from 1907 through the fifth edition, 1931. The name was changed by a 1928 BGN decision; it appeared as 'Angora Mountain' on the 1939 edition.
'Named by a sheepman honoring the leader of his flock, an Angora goat.' (Newsletter 1, no. 1, Oct. 1968: 5.) (SeNF)" – Peter Browning, Place Names of the Sierra Nevada (2004)

“The mountain coyote (Canis latrans lestis) has a wide range throughout the Sierra. (Grinnell and Storer: Animal Life in the Yosemite, 1924, pp. 71-76.)” – Francis P. Farquhar, Place Names of the High Sierra (1926)

“That nearest the pass is strikingly barred across its steep craggy summit with light streaks. As this is an unusually marked case of this peculiarity and as it seems well occasionally to have a mountain whose name bears some relation to its visible character, I called it Striped Mountain.” - Bolton Coit Brown, Sierra Club Bulletin (Volume 1, 1896, no. 8, page 309.)

Image