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Interesting article on Snow Creek to San Jacinto

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Interesting article on Snow Creek to San Jacinto

Postby Cy Kaicener » Sun Oct 25, 2009 3:51 pm

I just read an interesting magazine article on the North Face of San Jacinto
http://www.palmspringslife.com/Palm-Spr ... p-Beyond/#
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Postby avalanch » Mon Oct 26, 2009 4:21 pm

Very Nice...
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Postby jesu, joy of man's desiring » Mon Oct 26, 2009 4:30 pm

...thanks for the link. Who knew that Snow Creek had its own historians, and had whipped the asses of some very experienced mountaineers. I also liked the story of the slobbering, deranged attack-dogs that used to guard this face. Probably the best article we will ever read regarding this historical route, though I think she missed the aspiring Everest climber who fell to his death on Snow Creek.

Instead of the attack-dogs, it would be cool to install FIGHT ON in a clapboard security shack at the base of this route--pay him a yearly stipend to guard this route. He could shine a 50,000 candle-power spotlight at all approaching ninja climbers, while also delivering a religious lecture to them through an insanely loud megaphone. Awesome.

Someday I hope to encounter FIGHT ON while wandering one of my lonesome hiking trails. We'll discuss the Snow Creek guard shack contract.

--STEVE
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Postby MoapaPk » Mon Oct 26, 2009 5:17 pm

Cool article.

It is interesting that the article implies there is a bushwhack alternative to trespassing; is that for real, or is the alternate route over 5.x rock and through dense manzanita? Do you think volunteers could cut a trail through the brush?

The USFS is often not happy with people cutting trails. There is a route up the S side of Charleston Peak, NV, and the trail-less path gains about 5200', mainly through a narrow canyon. Since there is a perennial stream in the canyon, the brush is nearly impenetrable. A local fellow gathered up some volunteers to make a single, defined trail by cutting brush and cairning the route for the first 1.5 miles. Currently there are about 5 braided, eroding herdpaths. The USFS got wind of the plans, and forbade him to cut brush.

So I guess that if you want to clear a trail on USFS land, keep your plans close to the chest.
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Postby Bob Burd » Mon Oct 26, 2009 8:34 pm

MoapaPk wrote:Cool article.

It is interesting that the article implies there is a bushwhack alternative to trespassing; is that for real, or is the alternate route over 5.x rock and through dense manzanita? Do you think volunteers could cut a trail through the brush?

The USFS is often not happy with people cutting trails. There is a route up the S side of Charleston Peak, NV, and the trail-less path gains about 5200', mainly through a narrow canyon. Since there is a perennial stream in the canyon, the brush is nearly impenetrable. A local fellow gathered up some volunteers to make a single, defined trail by cutting brush and cairning the route for the first 1.5 miles. Currently there are about 5 braided, eroding herdpaths. The USFS got wind of the plans, and forbade him to cut brush.

So I guess that if you want to clear a trail on USFS land, keep your plans close to the chest.


When I was there last Spring with Miguel (I know, who <i>wasn't</i>), we came across an older feller camped just below the snow tongue. Forgot his name, but he'd been working on the all-legal bushwhack route, cuttin' and trimmin' things into shape. The only problem as I recall is it involves some extra miles and a 2,000-foot descent. Which makes most of us want to still take our chances with DWA guard.

(btw, the article can't be any good if they refer to "Mt. Denali")
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Postby Day Hiker » Mon Oct 26, 2009 8:54 pm

LOL -- Mt. Denali.

Denali has two big, distinct summits, so if you go there, you're going to the Denalis.

(Sierras?)
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Postby MoapaPk » Mon Oct 26, 2009 9:21 pm

Bob Burd wrote: The only problem as I recall is it involves some extra miles and a 2,000-foot descent.


Seems to me that selective use of high explosives might allow a better alternative route; it might even fit in with the MYLF plans.
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Water Authority

Postby ChugachMan » Mon Oct 26, 2009 9:26 pm

I didn't know of the alternate route... maybe that's the way to go. The water authority wouldn't even grant access to RMRU to hike up to retrieve rescue gear, that's how anal they are.
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