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Opinions needed: Traveling Duffel What to buy

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onsight

Postby attimount » Tue Mar 02, 2010 4:59 am

I have 3 of this duffle bag, and I'm really satisfied with them. Waterproof, durable, and resiztent. You can buy them at mec.
http://www.onsightequipment.com/cgi-bin/gov/1790.html
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Postby waXology » Tue Mar 02, 2010 11:15 am

surfnturf wrote:
what are you doing with a 70cm ice axe in the first place? are you 6'7" or something? :D shorter is better dude! :wink:


I know im a little worried now as i bought online, but have bought from the site before so if it's too long ill return for a 65cm.

Without having used one before I felt I'd prefer longer rather than being hunched over on a smaller one. but yeah trial and error i guess.
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Re: Opinions needed: Traveling Duffel What to buy

Postby WouterB » Tue Mar 02, 2010 11:32 am

waXology wrote:...


Went to Elbrus last year. Unless you are going very early in the season, I can't see the need for an ice axe. On the complete trip, I saw maybe one guy with an ice axe and he looked like it was more trouble than anything else. I tried sliding down some parts because I was tired, but the gradient is never really big enough.

I was there for three weeks and managed to put everything I needed inside my 75L Gregory backpack. Needless to say I didn't change clothes much. When not in the mountains, I tend to wash my clothes every (other) evening. On the mountain, I wear merino wool (smellfree). There's plenty of fabrics out there that are dry withing 20min.

Besides, taking so much luggage will cost you a small fortune. If you were close to a big city, I'd say take it and leave the duffel in the hotel for the rest of your trip. But in Russia, I wouldn't!
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Postby The Chief » Tue Mar 02, 2010 1:18 pm

It's too bad that this mother of all Heavy Vinyl bags aint made no more.

I have had the original one for over 20 years and it has been all over this planet with me. Through thick and thin. Been tossed by the burliest of luggage handlers anywhere. It still rocks and rolls.

PATAGONIA BLACK HOLE BAG.... 9000cu.in.
Image

But, TNF still makes the BC BAG 9000 cu.in. and it too will take the best of beatings and keep going.
Image

If you want strictly non-Chinese manu'd, these guys have a nice deal...

SP's CILO Duffel 6700 cu.in.

WILD THINGS
MULE BAG... 8800cu.in

Image
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Re: Opinions needed: Traveling Duffel What to buy

Postby Joe White » Tue Mar 02, 2010 3:54 pm

benjamingray wrote:
Brad Marshall wrote:
benjamingray wrote:
Brad Marshall wrote:Image


Brad, is this what you use on Denail? Do you "waterproof" them somehow?


Yes, I use the X-large on Denali. It's a long bag with a low center of gravity so the sleds don't tend to tip over as much. If you don't know this already another tip is don't tie your duffle to the sled very tight. Too tight and the tension in the cord torques the sled out of shape rounding off and twisting the bottom which leads to additional frustration (not sliding straight and tipping over more often). Instead, make sure your duffle is well secured to the climbing rope and only lightly tied to the sled.

I haven't found a need to waterproof them even when they get dumped on by heavy snowfall.

http://c0278592.cdn.cloudfiles.rackspac ... 601181.JPG


That shape does look sled friendly. Thanks for the tips, cool picture :D


I have also used these (not on a sled) but really like these things. Durable, burly, and cheap.

Can't say regarding waterproofing though....
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Postby Brad Marshall » Tue Mar 02, 2010 6:31 pm

waXology wrote:
surfnturf wrote:
what are you doing with a 70cm ice axe in the first place? are you 6'7" or something? :D shorter is better dude! :wink:


I know im a little worried now as i bought online, but have bought from the site before so if it's too long ill return for a 65cm.

Without having used one before I felt I'd prefer longer rather than being hunched over on a smaller one. but yeah trial and error i guess.


If it was me I'd keep the 70 and even trade up to a 75 and I'm only 5'-9". Of course we all know we should be climbing in balance and not leaning on our axes but when I rest I often do this and I'm always hunched over.
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Postby dskoon » Tue Mar 02, 2010 7:04 pm

Brad Marshall wrote:
waXology wrote:
surfnturf wrote:
what are you doing with a 70cm ice axe in the first place? are you 6'7" or something? :D shorter is better dude! :wink:


I know im a little worried now as i bought online, but have bought from the site before so if it's too long ill return for a 65cm.

Without having used one before I felt I'd prefer longer rather than being hunched over on a smaller one. but yeah trial and error i guess.


If it was me I'd keep the 70 and even trade up to a 75 and I'm only 5'-9". Of course we all know we should be climbing in balance and not leaning on our axes but when I rest I often do this and I'm always hunched over.


How tall are you, Waxology?
I'm just about 6'1", and I use a 70, despite one of my buddies yelling at me at the time to go way shorter. If you do just a bit of research into this, you'll soon find the two different opposing camps on it. I went the standard way, measuring to the floor, etc. I will say that so far, in my limited use, ie. a couple times up on Hood, I can't imagine using anything shorter. The 70 served me well.
Depends on what you're doing, I think. The steeper the terrain(which I've not ventured into yet), the shorter the axe you'll want. But, for general glacier travel, and milder slopes, I think having slightly longer is better.
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Postby dskoon » Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:13 pm

There ya go, one from the "other" camp. Not even going to argue.
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Postby Brad Marshall » Tue Mar 02, 2010 10:49 pm

Just a few comments from my own experience:

surfnturf wrote:Shorter axes are better for a number of reasons...There are more reasons, but I can't think right now... ice axes are not walking sticks or trekking poles, they are a tool. Im 6'2" and I use a 60cm ice axe...


1) When falling, you can swing the axe quicker to self arrest position. It also should not get snagged as easily on the rope, clothing, leash, etc.

Whenever I've arrested a fall (slip) I've never swung my ax, only rolled over on it.

2) When digging a snow anchor, thats 5 or 10 cm of digging that you dont have to dig. You can make a snow anchor faster.

Maybe, if you're using your ax as the anchor. I've never dug a T-slot that was the exact size of my ax and I usually bury a picket.

3) When hiking, a shorter axe will get snagged less on straps, trees, bushes, other hikers, etc.

So true, especially those damn tree branches.

4) When traveling, much easier to pack.

A 75cm ax should fit in a duffle.

5) When opening a beer with the adze, you won't spill the beer quite as frequently.

Haha, I only take cans so I can't comment on this. :lol:

By the way, I'm 5'-9" with only 27" legs and find a 65 way to short for me. Everyone's different.
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Postby Snowball » Wed Mar 03, 2010 2:09 am

The Chief wrote:It's too bad that this mother of all Heavy Vinyl bags aint made no more.

I have had the original one for over 20 years and it has been all over this planet with me. Through thick and thin. Been tossed by the burliest of luggage handlers anywhere. It still rocks and rolls.

PATAGONIA BLACK HOLE BAG.... 9000cu.in.
Image

But, TNF still makes the BC BAG 9000 cu.in. and it too will take the best of beatings and keep going.
Image

If you want strictly non-Chinese manu'd, these guys have a nice deal...

SP's CILO Duffel 6700 cu.in.

WILD THINGS
MULE BAG... 8800cu.in

Image





Image


Y, i have a couple of those patagonia black hole bags. wish i had bought more than 2... they are SWWEETTT! check this out.... my buddy miguel with one of them doubling for his forgotten pack on our way up mt blanc! they have straps which double as adjustable shoulder straps.
:lol:
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Postby waXology » Wed Mar 03, 2010 3:58 am

dskoon wrote:
Brad Marshall wrote:
waXology wrote:
surfnturf wrote:
what are you doing with a 70cm ice axe in the first place? are you 6'7" or something? :D shorter is better dude! :wink:


I know im a little worried now as i bought online, but have bought from the site before so if it's too long ill return for a 65cm.

Without having used one before I felt I'd prefer longer rather than being hunched over on a smaller one. but yeah trial and error i guess.


If it was me I'd keep the 70 and even trade up to a 75 and I'm only 5'-9". Of course we all know we should be climbing in balance and not leaning on our axes but when I rest I often do this and I'm always hunched over.


How tall are you, Waxology?
I'm just about 6'1", and I use a 70, despite one of my buddies yelling at me at the time to go way shorter. If you do just a bit of research into this, you'll soon find the two different opposing camps on it. I went the standard way, measuring to the floor, etc. I will say that so far, in my limited use, ie. a couple times up on Hood, I can't imagine using anything shorter. The 70 served me well.
Depends on what you're doing, I think. The steeper the terrain(which I've not ventured into yet), the shorter the axe you'll want. But, for general glacier travel, and milder slopes, I think having slightly longer is better.


I'm 5'11. I spoke to the guys at the store who i bought my axe from, they hadn't sent it yet so i asked should i ge ta 65cm, the guy said he was 5'9 and used a 70cm. He recomended i keep the 70cm. so see how i go.
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