Welcome to SP!  -
Areas & RangesMountains & RocksRoutesImagesArticlesTrip ReportsGearOtherPeoplePlans & PartnersWhat's NewForum

what do you do for recovery?

Tips, tricks, workouts, injury advice.
 

Postby ksolem » Tue Nov 03, 2009 11:06 pm

That's interesting.. I'll just add that what I learned from wearing a heart rate monitor was that I was going too fast on the hard uphills and not fast enough on easier terrain. Basically I was going anaerobic at times for little benefit, and having to slow down on easier sections to rest. In most cases my time would average out to be the same by adjusting my pace with the monitor.
User Avatar
ksolem

 
Posts: 5719
Joined: Tue May 13, 2003 4:25 pm
Location: Monrovia, California, United States
Thanked: 12 times in 9 posts

Postby sealevelmick » Wed Nov 04, 2009 1:30 am

glass of milk and some potato chips
User Avatar
sealevelmick

 
Posts: 52
Joined: Mon Nov 12, 2007 5:53 am
Location: Santa Rosa, California, United States
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Re: what do you do for recovery?

Postby battledome » Wed Nov 04, 2009 2:22 pm

tobe945 wrote:Just wondering what people do out there to recover from alpine climbs?
I find that when I'm out climbing an alpine route in say, Rocky Mountain National Park with a 3-4 mile approach and 1000ft of climbing--be it ice, snow, or rock---that I'm strong on the approach and climb, and a little tired on the descent, but very very worn out the next day. I'm getting out about once a week but even when I was getting out more, I was stronger in the mountains, but didn't recover as well.
What can I do pre-climb, during the climb, or immediately after to enhance recovery? I can't afford to sleep all day if I climb all day the day before--I'm in medical school, so that just won't work!


I tend to lose my appetite - and therefore the will to properly refuel - at about 12k-13k when I'm coming from sea level. Remember that you have to not only refuel while climbing, but also during the descent. If not, you can really deplete your glycogen stores and feel pretty crappy for a while until you replenish them.

When I was living in RMNP and climbing, I'd eat a whole medium pizza from the Domino's in Estes Park when I got home after a big, long climb and then go straight to sleep. Can't say it prevented me from being sore, but I certainly didn't feel as crappy as I could have.
User Avatar
battledome

 
Posts: 141
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2009 8:56 pm
Location: Virginia, United States
Thanked: 1 time in 1 post

Postby Luciano136 » Wed Nov 04, 2009 7:59 pm

Interesting about the pace. In my case, a short outing where I push it hard will definitely tire me less than a long outing where I take more of a reasonable pace.

I think it's just an endurance vs cardio thing. I'm more a 'sprinter' type instead of a 'long distance runner'. I did get much better over the years though.
User Avatar
Luciano136

 
Posts: 3734
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:46 pm
Location: Huntington Beach, California, United States
Thanked: 9 times in 8 posts

Postby The Chief » Wed Nov 04, 2009 8:10 pm

I go ride a Century at 8k' or above.

Works every time...



PS: I live at 7800'.
The Chief

 
Thanked: time in post

Postby CBakwin » Thu Nov 05, 2009 4:23 pm

If you are talking about hard one day climbs, lots of good stuff here. I would say be sure to drink water and eat bars or trail mix during the climb. a heavy carb breakfast, with some protein and fat (like sausage, egg and cheese on a bagel, or breadfast burrito) on the way up, and on the drive home carb load again but with 30% protein if you can, and drink again....that's the best you can do, if that doesn't help, theyn you are probably just stuck with it. (Or you will have to find more time to train, but with 80 hr weeks, that is probably not to practical).
User Avatar
CBakwin

 
Posts: 456
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2004 12:05 am
Location: Bozeman/Livingston, Montana, United States
Thanked: 5 times in 5 posts

Postby Big Benn » Wed Nov 11, 2009 8:50 pm

Bignick wrote:I'm old, I'm slow, I smoked cigarettes for 35 years, I have coronary artery disease, and I can't run more than a couple of hundred feet. I can, however, do a 4000+ hike and climb up to over 11550' and cover 8 to 11 miles distance and not feel like I did anything out of the ordinary the next day. I have done 3000' hikes over 6-7 miles, then later in the day walked 3 miles with my wife.

Pace yourself, drink a lot of water, walk or hike several miles at a time and do it often, preferably up hill. You will get there.

+1.

You and I must have come out of the same mould. And almost at the same time!
User Avatar
Big Benn

 
Posts: 6589
Joined: Sat Oct 16, 2004 4:50 am
Location: European, United Kingdom
Thanked: 502 times in 316 posts

Postby Mihai Tanase » Wed Nov 11, 2009 9:07 pm

fossana wrote:Are you eating and hydrating enough before/during the climb?

And drink (after your efforts ) some effervescent aspirins against muscle fever.
Mihai Tanase

 
Thanked: time in post

Postby mstender » Wed Nov 11, 2009 9:14 pm

When I lived in California we always used to stop at In-N-Out Burger on the way back. :lol:
User Avatar
mstender

 
Posts: 223
Joined: Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:40 pm
Location: Phoenix, Arizona, United States
Thanked: 1 time in 1 post

Postby fatdad » Wed Nov 11, 2009 9:33 pm

mstender wrote:When I lived in California we always used to stop at In-N-Out Burger on the way back. :lol:


I would do the very same thing. I'd always be really hungry on the drive home from the Sierra, no matter what I snacked on. Once they opened that In-N-Out in Lancaster, I'd hit it on the way home and my stomach would feel happy.
User Avatar
fatdad

 
Posts: 1377
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2007 9:39 pm
Location: Los Angeles, California, United States
Thanked: 83 times in 57 posts

Postby fortybelow » Wed Nov 11, 2009 9:48 pm

Get plenty of healthy fats, high protein stuff, carbs and I personally supplement with glutamine.. And make sure ya get plenty of sleep.
User Avatar
fortybelow

 
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Jan 30, 2009 4:25 am
Location: Santa Barbara, California, sb, United States
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Postby Ze » Thu Nov 19, 2009 1:37 am

recovery is a combination of things, but certainly an important part is glycogen replenishment. you simply need to eat carbs. protein and good fats too of course (in smaller amounts). it is more important the days before activity to ensure you have the energy, but if you don't want to feel tired the day after, you also want to eat well during or post-hike.
User Avatar
Ze

 
Posts: 337
Joined: Tue Oct 21, 2008 2:50 am
Location: Bay Area, California, United States
Thanked: 60 times in 32 posts

Postby Casey Bates » Thu Nov 19, 2009 2:45 am

Skim chocolate milk works wonders within the first 30 minutes after you stop moving. Seriously. A nutritionist pointed this out to me a few years ago and I am hooked. It is a great mix of protein and carbs.
User Avatar
Casey Bates

 
Posts: 37
Joined: Mon Sep 11, 2006 2:48 am
Location: Seattle, Washington, United States
Thanked: 1 time in 1 post

Postby Ze » Fri Nov 20, 2009 4:26 am

Casey Bates wrote:Skim chocolate milk works wonders within the first 30 minutes after you stop moving. Seriously. A nutritionist pointed this out to me a few years ago and I am hooked. It is a great mix of protein and carbs.


yes! i have this too. a great tasting way to replenish
User Avatar
Ze

 
Posts: 337
Joined: Tue Oct 21, 2008 2:50 am
Location: Bay Area, California, United States
Thanked: 60 times in 32 posts

Postby Mark Straub » Fri Nov 20, 2009 4:40 am

My strategy is to eat a giant burger when I'm done. That keeps me coming down the mountain, too, and it gives me the protein and fat I desperately need.

-Mark
User Avatar
Mark Straub

 
Posts: 530
Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2007 11:21 pm
Location: Everett, Washington, United States
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Previous

Return to Technique and Training

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

© 2006-2013 SummitPost.org. All Rights Reserved.