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the castel of Sand in Taufers...

 
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the castel of Sand in Taufers...
the castel of Sand in Taufers / Campo Tures with the 2500 m higher Schwarzenstein / Sasso Nero in the background (close-up, September 2004)

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Viewing: 1-6 of 6    

Mathias ZehringRe: Great photo!

Mathias Zehring

Hasn't voted

thanks for your comment. I scanned some older slides and posted some more pictures on the page in the meantime
Posted Nov 27, 2004 6:07 am

wuedesauRe: Great photo!

wuedesau

Voted 10/10

On this photo the moraines are very well visible giving us a good impression of the size of the glacier in 1850.

The name Sasso Nero has remained strange for all time (although it is the official Italian expression) and in fact is declined by the locals as it is a pure invention by the Italians (Tolomei) who always tried to italianize this region. I wouldn´t use this expression if it is not absolutely necessary.
Posted Dec 1, 2004 3:12 am

Mathias ZehringRe: Great photo!

Mathias Zehring

Hasn't voted

Hi Klaus,

you are right with Tolomei - of course the italian name is a direct - and obviously not wrong - translation. But this is now 100 years ago, the name exists, half of the tourists there are italians - so we cannot turn back time and we should not try to do.
Posted Dec 1, 2004 6:06 pm

wuedesauRe: Great photo!

wuedesau

Voted 10/10

Well this part is Italian since 1918 but the people in Ahrn remained Tyrolean and many of them still do not accept these (in many cases wrong) translations. I guess you wouldn´t say ok if Waiblingen its streets and places and its sourrounding hills get names in a different language.

I think in a united Europe it is not necessary to keep up this sort of imperialism by imposing these stupid translations.
Posted Dec 2, 2004 8:30 am

Mathias ZehringRe: Great photo!

Mathias Zehring

Hasn't voted

SummitPost is not political. The names exist, probably they are reported in italian guidebooks, so we have to quote them. It is not to us to decide if this is right or wrong. If names are changed again by government then this would be another thing.

South Tyrol belongs to Italy now for 85 years, that means every citizen has learned the italian language. Nowerdays most men there do not have that strong feelings about naming as some decades ago.

I've read an interesting newspaper article: There are in fact still political initiatives of german minded politcians that want to kill the italian names. The most symbolic name of course is "Vetta d'Italia" for Klockerkarkopf (I've climbed it in September and intend to post a page). But _german_ speeking shop and hotel keepers in Ahrntal valley want to keep the _italian_ name because it attracts italian tourists and brings money. A german quote (from Brecht?) is "Erst kommt das Fressen und dann die Moral"
Posted Dec 2, 2004 1:26 pm

wuedesauRe: Great photo!

wuedesau

Voted 10/10

You are right with "Erst kommt das Fressen und dann die Moral" . Thats the reason why you can read these names there. But as I have very good friends there I know that the majority of the people declines these names.

Years ago in Austria in many restaurants you could find Eisbein, Kasseler, Klöpse, etc. on the menu with the intention to sell more. But Germans (as all the other foreign tourists) learned what Knödel, Fritatten, Eierschwammerl... are, even more, many people dislike this way of ingratiation. Therefore many of these German translations disappeared from the menu - and Germans still like our cuisine.

I think it is not a good argument to justify names like Vetta d' Italia with some enterprising hotel managers. Also the case that the majority of the population has learned more or less Italian is not a reason for the usage of these names.
Posted Dec 3, 2004 3:08 am

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Mathias ZehringSubmitted by Mathias Zehring
on Nov 20, 2004 10:09 am

Image ID: 78783
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Lat/Lon: 47.01020°N / 11.87390°E
Object Title: the castel of Sand in Taufers...