How many climbers does it take to change a light bulb?

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sneakyracer

 
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Re: How many climbers does it take to change a light bulb?

by sneakyracer » Thu Sep 16, 2010 4:44 pm

thespiffy wrote:The old link/video was removed due to copyright notification to YouTube. :roll:

It can now be found at the following two links;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXuzrIN_x2M&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQv-o5Kgbko


That is just insane! Couldnt pay me enough to do that...

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DanTheMan

 
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Re: How many climbers does it take to change a light bulb?

by DanTheMan » Thu Sep 16, 2010 6:12 pm

sneakyracer wrote:
thespiffy wrote:The old link/video was removed due to copyright notification to YouTube. :roll:

It can now be found at the following two links;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXuzrIN_x2M&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQv-o5Kgbko


That is just insane! Couldnt pay me enough to do that...


If there are two of them in harnesses, why not simulclimb it at least?

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MoapaPk

 
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by MoapaPk » Thu Sep 16, 2010 7:08 pm

1000Pks wrote:
MoapaPk wrote:The Mohawks in NY were paid well for high steel work, and were respected by their peers.


No workman's comp back then, so probably no stats on workplace injury or deaths. High rise work is pretty dangerous, we had a death some years back and it was an issue in the papers for awhile.


The Mohawks from NY and Quebec made up a good fraction of the high steel workers, but most of the workers were not Amerinds; many came from the shipyards. Undoubtedly it was dangerous work for all, as were many jobs back then; e.g. 96 people died in the construction of Hoover Dam. Much of that work was before the common use of antibiotics, so a cut could lead to a fatality. My mother's coworker died from exposure-exacerbated pneumonia while working at a butcher shop kept at 40F. Today, simple antibiotics would save her.

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ExcitableBoy

 
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by ExcitableBoy » Thu Sep 16, 2010 8:13 pm

I recall a climbing magazine interview/article about Mark Wilford. He said he worked high steel in Colorado in the winters and said he was the only non Native American worker up there.

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