Welcome to SP!  -
Liathach
Mountain/Rock

Liathach

 
Liathach

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Torridon area, Scotland, Europe

Lat/Lon: 57.56438°N / 5.4827°W

Object Title: Liathach

Elevation: 3456 ft / 1053 m

 

Page By: desainme

Created/Edited: Sep 26, 2003 / Jan 1, 2010

Object ID: 151909

Hits: 9428 

Page Score: 92.23%  - 38 Votes 

Vote: Log in to vote

 

Overview



This mountain is the largest in the vicinity of Loch Torridon a sea loch(lake) on the west coast of Scotland. You can see the Isle of Skye from Liathach. The mountain has a large prehistoric look to it and the main ridge line runs east and west. Remember it does arise from sea level at the northeast end of the upper loch and therefore will be somewhat larger than what one might expect given the modest elevation.

The peaks of Liathach are as follows:

Meall Dearg Red Hill 3150ft 960m Top
Mullach an Rathain Summit of the Pinnacles 3358ft 1023m Munro
Am Am Fasarinen The Talons 3050ft 927m Top
Spidean a'Choire Leith Pointed Peak of the Grey Corrie 3456ft 1054m Munro
Bidean Toll'a Mhuic Pointed Peak of the Pig's Hollow 3200ft 975m Top
Stuc a'Choire Diubh Bhig Peak of the Deep Black Corrie 3004ft 915m Top

A Munro is an objective of the Scottish hillwalker and some climbers. Much as folks in Colorado visit "fourteeners" or climbers in the Alps do "4000 m" peaks, the Scottish hillwalker has a list of 3000 foot mountains which (s)he visits in a more or less systematic way. Liathach is one of the more worthy targets of this pastime akin for example to an ascent of Crestone Needle or some such peak in Colorado. Some writers advise carrying a rope because escape off parts of the mountain may be treacherous. The northern pinnacles are one such place.

One way to tour this mountain is to start at the Ling Hut and walk north up the valley east of Liathach and turn westward along the foot of its North face. You ascend Meall Dearg by walking southward after some effort reach its 3150 summit. Then do the northern pinnacles and gain the main ridge after which you climb eastward along the spine of the mountain hitting Am Fasarinen The Talons 3050ft and then Stuc a'Choire Diubh Bhig 3456 feet the summit. Continue walking east to the east end and descend the southeastern ridge of the mountain. A corrie is a Scottish term for a Colorado "basin". It can snow in June and during the winter Liathach is a challenging climb with the usual alpine gear. The above tour is 12 miles and one might expect to spend 8 hours. Of course in the summer at this latitude you have a whole lot of daylight. The main ridge is graded Scottish grade II.
I think you pronounce it LYEE-uh-ghuch meaing the grey hoary one.

Getting There

Get to Glascow and drive north 101km on the A82 toward Fort William.
Continue on the A-82 northeast up past Loch Lochy (Great Glen is a big valley the bisects the Scottish highlands from Fort William up to the northeast end of Loch Ness) At Inverarry, leave the Great Glen and pick up A87 westbound. Continue north on A-890 til A-A896 which takes you to the village of Torridon at the head of the loch and the foot of Liathach.
I reckon that this is about 300km.

Mappy recommended a more easterly approach:
0 Km 0H00 Glasgow City (United Kingdom)

0 m 0H00 Exit from Glasgow City [930m]
at the sign
M8

Carlisle
Stirling
Edinburgh


930 m 0H02 Take the M8 [3.0km]
3 Km 0H05 Rejoin the M80 [6.9km]
in the direction of M80

Kincardine Bridge
Stirling


10 Km 0H09 Exit and take the A80 [16.7km] while following
Stirling
in the direction of A80

A80(E)
Stirling


via North Lanarkshire
27 Km 0H22 Take the M80 [11.7km] while following
Crianlarich - Perth
in the direction of M80

Perth
Stirling


39 Km 0H29 Carry on the M9 [9.8km]
in the direction of M9

Perth


49 Km 0H35 Exit and take the A9 [223.3km] while following
Crianlarich - Inverness
in the direction of A9

Perth


via Perth And Kinross
via Highland
Kessock Bridge
272 Km 03H25 Carry on the A9 [8.8km]
281 Km 03H31 Go through a place and carry on the A835 [69.0km]
via Highland
350 Km 04H37 In Highland turn left on the A896 [16.0km]
366 Km 04H52 Enter into Highland [1.2km]

367 Km 04H59 Torridon (Highland, United Kingdom)

http://www.streetmap.co.uk/newmap.srf?x=192500&y=857500&z=3&sv=192500,857500&st=4&ar=N&mapp=newmap.srf&searchp=newsearch.srf&dn=842

Map

When To Climb

It is a late spring through early fall climb. Remember that the northerly latitude and proximity to the Atlantic can bring rain and snow very quickly.
An avalanche swept away an experienced climber around 31 Dec. 2009

Camping

There is a youth hostel in Torridon and camping is available on request The Scottish Mountain Club own a cabin near the mountain called the Ling Hut. It appears to be3 km or so east of Torridon and is at the S.E. corner of Liathach.
Maps include:
Ordnance Survey 1:50000 Sheet 25
Ordnance Survey 1:25000 The Cuillin & Torridon Hills
http://www.mountaineering-scotland.org.uk/huts/hutlist2.html#ling
Ling Hut

If planning a trip to this area I think it would help to write to the Scottish Mountaineering Club at
http://www.smc.org.uk/about_us.htm

Weather

http://www.onlineweather.com/v4/uk/city/Fort_William.html

Weather
Info update from Climber Andrew Hagen:
As I recall, when we drove into Glen Torridon from the East (July 2003) we passed a house by a bridge where there was an up to date mountain weather forecast up on a board. This proved to be accurate when we did the climb that day.
I wouldn't know if this is permanent, but it was certainly useful to us as we were touring and didn't have TV or internet access at the time.

Lodgings Bed and Breakfast

STB Three Star

"Cromasaig", Torridon Road, Kinlochewe, Wester Ross, IV222PE

Tel: 01445 760234 or email: cromasaig

Map of Liathach

Map

Additions and Corrections

[ Post an Addition or Correction ]
Viewing: 1-7 of 7    
desainmeUntitled Comment

desainme

Hasn't voted

Thanks for your comments on winter climbs-any pix of Liathach or vistas from it would be a welcome addition.


I take it that the winter traverse of Liathach is similar to that of Aonach Eagach and March is more fun because of longer days?
Posted Feb 10, 2004 12:06 pm
Dan BaileyUntitled Comment

Dan Bailey

Hasn't voted

No pics on my computer I'm afraid, though I'll buy a scanner and change that soon. Yes, I reckon March is more fun due to longer days. But it all depends on some pretty unreliable weather and winter climbing conditions, so who can say for sure?





cheers
Posted Feb 10, 2004 12:33 pm
Andrew HagenUntitled Comment

Andrew Hagen

Voted 10/10

As I recall, when we drove into Glen Torridon from the East (July 2003) we passed a house by a bridge where there was an up to date mountain weather forecast up on a board. This proved to be accurate when we did the climb that day.


I wouldn't know if this is permanent, but it was certainly useful to us as we were touring and didn't have TV or internet access at the time.
Posted Oct 3, 2003 4:58 pm
Andrew HagenUntitled Comment

Andrew Hagen

Voted 10/10

It's worth mentioning that there are several books dedicated to the Munros and Munro bagging. These are particularly useful for the tourist who wishes to climb but doesn't really know where to go. I used the book by Cameron McNeish, but there are others as well, mostly just titled: The Munros.


Oh, by the way, I think you wrote Stuc a Choire Dhuig Bhig when you meant Spidean a Choire Leith in the text of the Overview section, and the pinnacles are "Am Fasarinen", as opposed to Am Farsinen.


These names are crazy.





Cheers


Andrew
Posted Oct 3, 2003 5:34 pm
Dan BaileyUntitled Comment

Dan Bailey

Hasn't voted

For experienced climbers, the traverse of the Northern Pinnacles of Mullach an Rathain, followed by the main crest over the Fasarinen Pinnacles, is one of the best easy winter mountaineering routes in Scotland. Officially it gets Scottish grade II, though difficulties depend on the build-up of snow and ice (when don't they?), and under tough conditions some bits might feel a touch hard for the grade. Technical tools and a rope would come in handy. This is a long trip in the short daylight hours of winter, and the descent is no fun in the dark.





The tiered sandstone flanks of this mountain offer some of the best icefall climbing in the country - sometimes. 200m grade V routes like Salmon Leap and Test Department are big ticks, and rarely climbed compared to the stuff on Ben Nevis, say. Nearby Beinn Eighe offers plenty more of the same, plus some wicked summer rock.
Posted Feb 10, 2004 10:56 am
desainmeUntitled Comment

desainme

Hasn't voted

Thanks for your comments on winter climbs-any pix of Liathach or vistas from it would be a welcome addition.


I take it that the winter traverse of Liathach is similar to that of Aonach Eagach and March is more fun because of longer days?
Posted Feb 10, 2004 12:06 pm
Dan BaileyUntitled Comment

Dan Bailey

Hasn't voted

No pics on my computer I'm afraid, though I'll buy a scanner and change that soon. Yes, I reckon March is more fun due to longer days. But it all depends on some pretty unreliable weather and winter climbing conditions, so who can say for sure?





cheers
Posted Feb 10, 2004 12:33 pm

Viewing: 1-7 of 7    

Images