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Getting in Shape to climb Mt. Whitney

Tips, tricks, workouts, injury advice.
 

Postby Ze » Tue Aug 31, 2010 4:34 am

bird wrote:#1 I disagree 100%, if the OP adds some (try not to read carefully...some) weight training and adds strength, I believe it will help her get to the top of Whitney (as do many other people, Twight, Shaul, etc)
#2 Again, I disagree, what makes a machine less intimidating? A good trainer can certainly make a broomstick, body bar, or empty barbell pretty non-intimidating.
#3 An advertisement? I have nothing to gain by recommending CF...I just find it very beneficial. Are you advertising bodyrecomposition.com? Which by the way has some great stuff in it. I see they are proponents of 5x5 for weightlifting, which is used by CF, and the site refers to Greg Everett, who has a long history with CF.
Anyways, CF is more than high intensity interval training, and HIIT is pertinent (as one part of a program), especially when training time is limited http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 123639.htm or http://www.naturalnews.com/028851_inter ... rcise.html as just a few examples. I am not saying this is the only way to train...but a great addition to an all around program.


#1: WHY? There actually needs to be a solid explanation. Can any of those names you mentioned provide real reasons why weight training will help? (I'm saying this assuming the person is already doing hiking or something similar for cardio training).

#2: That's just how people are. I think we'll just agree to disagree.

#3: Nope, just promoting education :) (for me too). No doubt HIIT has benefits, but they are basically being compared to "jogging" intensity. Doing sustained training and 80-95% heartrate can illicit better improvements in cardiovascular endurance (but not strength) than intervals.

If you want to tell the OP to do interval training up steep hills, then I'm all for it. 5 min of face pace hiking, 3 min rest, do over and over. That will improve cardiovascular fitness and glycogen storage. But when I initially read about weights and crossfit I'm not getting that sort of training idea...
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Postby MoapaPk » Tue Aug 31, 2010 5:02 am

Nancy -- I just wanted to let you know that this point-counterpoint is perfectly normal on SP. Any time that someone asks for exercise advice, arguments spin off, involving lots of complicated exercise routines that most of us don't do or even understand.

While hiking the Whitney Trail is a tough endeavor, it's not the same as competing in the Tour de France or the UFC.
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Re: Getting in Shape to climb Mt. Whitney

Postby MoapaPk » Tue Aug 31, 2010 3:47 pm

Dingus Milktoast wrote:Eat often, drink more often, rest 10 minutes out of every hour, and WALK YOUR OWN PACE.


Good advice. Often the fittest person takes off like a deer, and person behind feels obligated to keep the same pace.
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Postby DANNYC » Tue Aug 31, 2010 4:22 pm

I slept at the Portal the first night. Hiked to Trail Camp the next day and camped. Hiked to the summit and back to Trail camp the 3rd day. Hiked back to the portal the 4th morning. I got sick of the altitude but that is the easiest way to get to the top of Whitney.
Like they said above, keep the pace slow on the way up & rest often. That really helps.

http://www.summitpost.org/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=54786
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Postby SoCalHiker » Tue Aug 31, 2010 4:37 pm

What works best for me to avoid altitude sickness is drinking. I usually start drinking more the day before the hike/climb and then of course during the hike/climb. I use as an indicator of sufficient water intake whether I need to pee or not. If you don't need to pee regulalrly you don't drink enough. That at least works for me.

Acclimatization of course is imporant, too, but the right schedule varies a lot from one individual to the other. You have to find what works best for you.

As others have said, good physical shape helps in general, but you don't need to pack muscles to climb Whitney (or any mountain for that matter). There are people in excellent physical shape running marathons but can't adjust to altitude.
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Postby mconnell » Tue Aug 31, 2010 7:02 pm

SoCalHiker wrote:What works best for me to avoid altitude sickness is drinking. I usually start drinking more the day before the hike/climb


Me, too. If I have enough of a hangover, I don't give a shit about the altitude.
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Postby kevin trieu » Tue Aug 31, 2010 7:12 pm

it should also be noted that if you go as fast as you can up and down, altitude doesn't have a chance to get you. there's a delay.
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Postby SoCalHiker » Tue Aug 31, 2010 7:15 pm

kevin trieu wrote:it should also be noted that if you go as fast as you can up and down, altitude doesn't have a chance to get you. there's a delay.


that may be true for some (most?) people, but others can get symptoms very rapidly, certainly within hours.
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Postby bird » Tue Aug 31, 2010 9:02 pm

Ze wrote:
bird wrote:#1 I disagree 100%, if the OP adds some (try not to read carefully...some) weight training and adds strength, I believe it will help her get to the top of Whitney (as do many other people, Twight, Shaul, etc)
#2 Again, I disagree, what makes a machine less intimidating? A good trainer can certainly make a broomstick, body bar, or empty barbell pretty non-intimidating.
#3 An advertisement? I have nothing to gain by recommending CF...I just find it very beneficial. Are you advertising bodyrecomposition.com? Which by the way has some great stuff in it. I see they are proponents of 5x5 for weightlifting, which is used by CF, and the site refers to Greg Everett, who has a long history with CF.
Anyways, CF is more than high intensity interval training, and HIIT is pertinent (as one part of a program), especially when training time is limited http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 123639.htm or http://www.naturalnews.com/028851_inter ... rcise.html as just a few examples. I am not saying this is the only way to train...but a great addition to an all around program.


#1: WHY? There actually needs to be a solid explanation. Can any of those names you mentioned provide real reasons why weight training will help? (I'm saying this assuming the person is already doing hiking or something similar for cardio training).

#2: That's just how people are. I think we'll just agree to disagree.

#3: Nope, just promoting education :) (for me too). No doubt HIIT has benefits, but they are basically being compared to "jogging" intensity. Doing sustained training and 80-95% heartrate can illicit better improvements in cardiovascular endurance (but not strength) than intervals.

If you want to tell the OP to do interval training up steep hills, then I'm all for it. 5 min of face pace hiking, 3 min rest, do over and over. That will improve cardiovascular fitness and glycogen storage. But when I initially read about weights and crossfit I'm not getting that sort of training idea...

It works for these guys and gals. http://www.alpinist.com/doc/web08x/wfea ... e-training
And I've had great long hard days in the mountains without any LSD training. In my experience this stuff works and I hope the OP is open minded enough to look past the Biggest loser into some more effective methods to compliment her running and hiking.
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Postby mstender » Tue Aug 31, 2010 10:04 pm

bird wrote:It works for these guys and gals. http://www.alpinist.com/doc/web08x/wfea ... e-training
And I've had great long hard days in the mountains without any LSD training. In my experience this stuff works and I hope the OP is open minded enough to look past the Biggest loser into some more effective methods to compliment her running and hiking.


Yes, in order to day hike Whitney you definetely have to haul large rocks like the dude on the picture in your link!
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