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Open Discussion on Running as a part of a Training Regimen

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Open Discussion on Running as a part of a Training Regimen

Postby RickF » Sat Oct 10, 2009 1:05 am

This thread is open to anyone to post their experience or opinion about incorporating running as a part of their regular training or condition regimen. You can post here regardless of which peaks you have summited or the highest altitude you've visited.

I'm 52 years old. I run off and on, I usually increase the amount I run when I'm getting in shape for an upcoming trip. sometimes I run a flat 3 mile loop. I have entered a few 10k's, half-marathons, and one 26 mile marathon. I've been running varying amounts since I was 18. I started running back then to get in better cardiovascular shape for downhill skiing. But then I found out that I enjoy running.

Unless I'm training for a distance run, I usually run between 10 & 20 miles per week. Running is the best workout for me since I work and don't have all day or several hours to train. In an hour I can get a good work-out almost anywhere without any special equipment or facility.

I also ride a road bike and mountain bike. My typical road bike rides are 20 to 30 miles and mountain bike rides are 5 to 12 miles. My knees sometimes hurt after bike rides but they never hurt after running. Last year I had my knees checked out by an Orthopedic specialist and had an MRI. The doctor told me my knees are fine and I can keep doing any activity I want. He suggested that I add some specific exercise to build some strength in my knees. Now I'm doing some lunges and squats in addition to my running and riding.

I don't meet the criteria to post on the thread about not running. I haven't been to 8,000 meters. I haven't summited Denali or Rainier (yet). I have summited most of the California Fourteeners. I made it to the tops of Polemonium, North Palisade and Starlight last August. A few years back I did Thunderbolt as a day-trip.

Ed Viesturs climbed all of the worlds 8,000 meter peaks without supplemental oxygen. The foundation of his training regimen was running.

Running does not destroy everyone's knees, feet and hips. Running is not for everybody and I don't suggest that it is. Running is good for some people, including me.
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Postby Augie Medina » Sat Oct 10, 2009 1:50 am

Running is the core of my aerobic conditioning. My average is about 25 miles per week. Some of that is trail running. Once a week I do a track workout with my running club: timed intervals monitored by our coach. I find that this anerobic session really keeps me at peak form. However, I have to be careful not to overdo it at track sessions because injury will find you real quick if you lose discipline and simply thrash yourself on the track every time.

I also mountain bike. I absolutely loath gym treadmills and step machines, but I have resorted to them in times of necessity.
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Postby sneakyracer » Sat Oct 10, 2009 2:13 am

I am 6-2 and about 185 lbs. I tried running on the road but after a few miles I felt a bit of pain in my joints (im only 35). Running off road (packed trails) felt MUCH nicer. I mainly ride my MTB or my Road bike which allow me to put long hours in my workouts. (I have ben up to 10-12 hrs on a bike ride). I workout with a Garmin and when analyzing the data the running is quite stressful on the cardio obviously BUT its hard to sustain for hours on end. On the bike I can regulate my sustained or average heart rate much better and keep at it longer. I am sure given enough conditioning one can do the same while running. But for me even when I slow the running pace a bit I am still close to anaerobic.
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Postby Grampahawk » Sat Oct 10, 2009 6:31 pm

I'm 60 and run 6 miles, 3X per week on the road, but with several steep hills in the various loops. You should combine strength training at least 2X/week. I also mix in mountain biking (one or two 30 mile trip/wk), and eliptical or spinng classes in the winter.
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Postby CClaude » Mon Oct 12, 2009 3:14 pm

I DID run, until I was out running a couple of winters ago and slipped on some ice and messed up my knee. Had one surgery and then messed it up again. Not the fault of running, it could have happened skiing also. Now I have to bike, elliptical,....

For me I found running to be the most time efficient cardiovascular workout. I rarely get my heart rate up like I did when I was running, and I have to go 2-5x longer biking then when I was running to get the same workout.
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Postby BeDrinkable » Mon Oct 12, 2009 3:42 pm

I only run in the winter when it's too cold to bike much. I am actually able to push myself more easily on a bike than when running, because running is just too damn painful. I've sort of come to the conculsion that I'm not really built for it, but I certainly see the benefit. When I do it, I probably average 20 miles per week.
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Postby albanberg » Mon Oct 12, 2009 4:04 pm

MikeTX wrote:Well, you know, I'm out to prove to the world that running is evil.

The point of the thread I started was to verify that you don't have to be a runner to be successful with big mountains. That's all.

I also like to run. I ran this weekend - not far, but I ran nonetheless.

I also agree that it's the most efficient means of cardiovascular training. Put on your shoes and go like the wind. It's great!

Still, it's reassuring to those of us who don't have great knees that there are alternatives to running. Not everyone can run 35 miles a week and not everyone lives with the Sierra in their back yard.

I have a reconstructed acl and osteoarthritis. I live 3 hours away from anything that could reasonably be called a hill and 12 hourse away from any mountains. It's good to hear that there's still hope for me if I want get up a big mountain.



Hi Mike, you might want to check out this site:
http://www.drfostersessentials.com

Check out the info there on arthritis/inflammation and diet, you might find it interesting. I use products from this site and they work well for me.
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Postby DukeJH » Mon Oct 12, 2009 4:39 pm

I started running in November 2006 to lose weight and get in shape for Alpine Ascents' glacier mountaineering course in May 2007. I managed to lose 40 lbs and was in absolutely the best shape of my life. Although as a baseball player I hated running I high school (I loved cycling though), I found i enjoyed the running, especially the small hills in southwest Fort Worth. I continued to run and have run 4 half marathons. In February 2009 I injured my hip (strained superior head of my sartorious) during speed work and couldn't run so I began swimming.

I swam from February through mid-June getting up to one mile. In June I began to run again, but sprained my ankle July 4. I stayed off of it for three weeks or so and began running again, reduced mileage and intesnity. Shortly therafter, I stepped off the side of the paved trail and aggravated the ankle sprain and developed a high ankle sprain. I haven't run since.

To train for my Mexico Volcanoes climbs in November, I am road cycling, weight training, and using a balance board to continue my ankle rehab. Hopefully, the cycling will be as effective for this trip as the running was for the last one.

I plan to start running again when I return from Mexico.
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Postby DukeJH » Mon Oct 12, 2009 6:10 pm

Thanks. I'm doing for Summit for Someone. I couldn't resist the opportunity.
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Re: Run w/30lb pack

Postby bird » Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:08 pm

PeakAgitation wrote:I also scoot over to a nearby ski resort and simulate a steep ascent with ice boots, crampons, etc. You'll attract Ski Patrollers like crazy, but you stay to the side and buy a lift ticket, they'll let you be.

If the resort is on Forest service land, etc. They should not make you buy a lift ticket.
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Re: Run w/30lb pack

Postby CClaude » Mon Oct 12, 2009 9:30 pm

bird wrote:
PeakAgitation wrote:I also scoot over to a nearby ski resort and simulate a steep ascent with ice boots, crampons, etc. You'll attract Ski Patrollers like crazy, but you stay to the side and buy a lift ticket, they'll let you be.

If the resort is on Forest service land, etc. They should not make you buy a lift ticket.


Depends on the state and ski area. In California even though the land is "rented" from the National Forests (ie: $1 for 99years or whatever), in California state law I believe its tresspassing to be at a ski resort without a ticket.

As for Arizona they don't care. We go to the local mountain (Snowbowl) and we ski up and huck off the top on mornings of good dumps before work and the sno-cat guys just wave.
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Postby kovarpa » Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:37 pm

I would agree running (especially trail running with hills) is excellent training for alpine climbing since it is both time efficient, resembles some of movements on the approach and you can run at night. I just don't do that much of it because I don't like running.
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