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ENNISS PEAK
Mountain/Rock

ENNISS PEAK

 
ENNISS PEAK

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Utah, United States, North America

Lat/Lon: 40.51403°N / 111.78693°W

Object Title: ENNISS PEAK

County: SALT LAKE COUNTY

Activities: Hiking

Season: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter

Elevation: 9322 ft / 2841 m

 

Page By: oldgoatwasatch

Created/Edited: Jun 2, 2013 / Jun 4, 2013

Object ID: 851508

Hits: 1346 

Page Score: 76.72%  - 8 Votes 

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Overview

Enniss Peak Summit Plaque
Interesting Discovery On Top
Enniss Peak is a sub peak visible from the north, in Salt Lake County, as a large bump along the Draper Ridge skyline.  From the south, in Utah County, it is seen as a more prominent protrusion along the Draper Ridge profile but it is overshadowed by the snow capped picturesque peaks of Alpine Ridge.

A highly overlooked hike along the Wasatch Front, Enniss Peak, however,  is another of Wastch Front's  "four thousand foot hikes" besides the highly popular Mount Olympus.  Hundreds, if not thousands, of hikers stream by it every year, ignoring it, on their way to the more lofty Lone Peak, but it itself is a worthy goal.

Getting There

Orson Smith Trailhead Park Sign
As seen from 2000 E.
The objective for the trailheads leading to Enniss Peak is a southeast Salt Lake County dirt road, in Draper,  known as Corner Canyon Road.  This starts at the Orson Smith Trailhead Park which is approximately 12650 S. 2000 E. 
Orson Smith Trailhead Park Plaque
 
Orson Smith Trailhead Park
The stairway leads up to the trails.
To get to the Orson Smith Trailhead Park it is a little confusing because coming east, from I-15 off the 12300 S. exit, you can't continue completely due east on 12300 S. to 2000 E.  At 1300 E. 12300 S. turns into something else, and you have to turn right, go south down the hill to a roundabout, out of which you continue east on Pioneer Road which surprisingly is 12300 S.  Voila!!  Continue east of 1300 E. on Pioneer Road  to 2000 E. turn right and a couple of blocks south is the trailhead park, which is well marked, has paved parking, restroom and picnic facilities, and is an access to the Bonneville Shoreline Trail, Bear Canyon and other destinations. Also, as mentioned before, it is the beginning of the dirt road known as Corner Canyon Road.
Entry way into Orson Smith Trailhead Park
Corner Canyon road veers to the right and parking for Orson Smith Trailhead Park continues up and to the left.

Routes

ORSON SMITH/BEAR CANYON TH - CHERRY CANYON LOGGING TRAIL(*see SP "Cherry Canyon Logging Trail" page by SP member Joseph Bullough)

This is the first of three (that I know of) trails to Enniss Peak and beyond, but it is the one I haven't hiked except for a short distance up to the cross over to Cherry Canyon side of the ridge.  It begins at Orson Smith Trailhead Park that climbs a set of easy switchbacks to the Bonneville Shoreline Trail.  From there signage leads you to the Bear Canyon Trailhead which starts the Cherry Canyon Logging Trail.  The trail climbs a series of swithbacks up the south side of Bear Canyon until it eventually crosses over to the north side of Cherry Canyon.  The trail eventually traverses across the head of Cherry Canyon where it joins with the Draper Ridge Trail.  It is the longest and highest climb of the three trails.

DRAPER RIDGE TRAILHEAD
Trailhead for Draper Ridge Trail (unofficial)
This is what the unofficial trailhead for the Draper Ridge Trail looks like. There is some wide space off the road on the other side to park.
This is an undeveloped trailhead, however the one I used exclusively 20 years ago to hike frequently in the Lone Peak Wilderness area. It begins at a site, 1.7 miles up the Corner Canyon Road, that has had some excavating done which leads to a road that switches back and forth up the side of the mountain. At the eighth switchback the trail leaves the road. A sign there (no picture) points the way to Lone Peak.  From there the trail is fairly steep as it crosses over a small canyon and climbs up to a saddle at about 7200ft.  From there it works its way up to Draper Ridge and you're on your way.  
TRAIL FORK WHERE JACOBS LADDER TRAIL MEETS DRAPER RIDGE TRAIL
This is the fork in the trail where Jacobs Ladder trail and Draper Ridge trail meet to form what I call the Lone peak trail. At the top of the small wash the trail levels out to traverse horizontaly the base of Enniss Peak.
At the bottom of a little wash just before Enniss Peak it joins with the Jacob's Ladder Trail.  At the top of the wash the trail levels out and traverses horizontally skirting Enniss Peak. There isn't a trail to the top of Enniss Peak so I've just traversed cross country to the summit.
ENNISS PEAK FROM LONE PEAK TRAIL
The outcropping at the top is the top of Enniss Peak. This view is from Lone Peak trail. There isn't trail to the top from here but a short cross country traverse will get you there. Hooray!!!

JACOB'S LADDER TRAILHEAD

Jacob's Ladder Trailhead Parking and Facilities
This is the parking lot with restroom and picnic facilities for the Jacob's Ladder Trailhead, and for the Ghost Falls Trailhead as well. If it's been raining or snowing this can be a real muddy mess.
Jacob's Ladder Trail is probably the most popular and well known and shortest of the three routes to Enniss Peak, but it can be problematic because it's farther up the road with two gates which, if closed, can make it impossible to get there with a vehicle.  Also if it has been raining or snowing the trailhead parking can be really muddy even for walking.  The trailhead is up the Draper Ridge Road  2.6 miles and has dirt parking, restrooms, and picnic tables.  It also serves as the trailhead for Ghost Falls Trail.
Jacob's Ladder Trailhead Sign
Jacob's Ladder trail this way. It's a short walk up and across the road from the parking,

Jacob's Ladder Trailhead
Only the most stout of heart and intrepid of mind enter here.
LOOKING DOWN FIRST MILE AND QUARTER OF JACOB LADDERS TRAIL
This is looking west. From here on it's straight up as you climb north.
The trail starts a short distance up the road and is marked.  It makes a few switchbacks up to a ridge where it follows an old dirt road for a mile and a quarter, there it levels out at the top of large outcropping that is flat on top and makes a great view area.  This is where the fun begins.  The trail proper begins due north from here and is straight up. Well for a while until it veers west a bit and traverses from one drainage to another under a canopy of trees and foliage, then it gets steep again with small switchbacks until it joins with the Draper Ridge Trail.  From there it is just a short cross country traverse to the top of Enniss Peak 

Red Tape

I am not aware of needing any special permit to recreate in the area but Draper City Parks has numerous rules for their Corner Canyon trail system.  The only problems I'm aware of is that there are three gates along Corner Canyon Road and at particular times of the year they will be closed and locked. If one had a special reason for vehicular use beyond these closed gates I don't know if it would be possible to obtain special dispensation to do so or not, nor do I know who to contact other than the Draper City Parks department.

When to Climb

When to climb??
  • When there aren't  blizzard conditions.
  • When you have the strength and energy.
  • When you have snow shoes if required.
  • When you don't feel like doing Lone Peak.
  • On the way going to and coming from Lone Peak.
  • When you feel like it.  When you get the urge.
  • Before your time is up.

Camping

There are no camping facilities in the Corner Canyon area, at the trailheads, nor along the road.  Since it is all within Draper City's jurisdiction I'm pretty sure it is not allowed.  However as you climb the trails you enter into National Forest Service land and it would only seem reasonable that except maybe for open fires their rules for camping would apply.  As I hiked the Jacob's Ladder trail there were a few little clearings where backpack camping was possible and where there were signs that it had been done.  East of Enniss Peak there is a large meadow area where in the past my son and I did some camping before continuing on to Lone Peak.

Neighboring Prominent Peaks of Enniss Peak

LONE PEAK OVERLOOKS EVERTHING

LONE PEAK FROM ENNISS PEAK
Lone Peak as seen from Enniss Peak


LONE PEAK
Lone Peak looming above along the Jacobs Ladder trail.


TIMPANOGOS MASSIF

TIMPANOGOS MASSIF
The Timpanogos Massif slowly rises above the skyline as you climb the Jacobs Ladder trail.


THE ONE AND ONLY BOX ELDER PEAK

BOX ELDER PEAK
As seen from the Jacobs Ladder trail.


TRAVERSE MOUNTAINS

TRAVERSE MOUNTAIN
Traverse Mountain as seen from the Jacobs Ladder Trail


THE OQUIRRHS

OQUIRRH MOUNTAINS
The southern end of Oquirrh Range across the Salt Lake Valley


LAKE MOUNTAINS OF UTAH COUNTY

LAKE MOUNTAINS
Lake Mountains in Utah County on the other side of Utah Lake





Jacob's Ladder Trail Wildflower Garden


Indian Paintbrush and Wild Onion along Jacob's Ladder Trail

INDIAN PAINTBRUSH ALONG JACOBS LADDER TRAIL

WILD ONION ALONG JACOBS LADDER TRAIL





White Wildflowers along the trail

WILD FLOWER ALONG JACOBS LADDER TRAIL


FLOWER ALONG JACOBS LADDER TRAIL











WILD FLOWER ALONG JACOBS LADDER TRAIL

Yellow Wildflowers adorning the trailside

WILD FLOWER ALONG JACOBS LADDER TRAIL











WILD FLOWER ALONG JACOBS LADDER TRAIL
FLOWER ALONG JACOBS LADDER TRAIL














FLOWER ALONG JACOBS LADDER TRAIL

Blue and Purple Wildflowers

FLOWER ALONG JACOBS LADDER TRAIL











FLOWER ON JACOBS LADDER TRAIL








Images