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Trangia Series 27 Stoves
Gear Review

Trangia Series 27 Stoves

 
Trangia Series 27 Stoves

Page Type: Gear Review

Object Title: Trangia Series 27 Stoves

Manufacturer: Trangia

Your Opinion: 
 - 2 Votes
 

 

Page By: mountainmanmark

Created/Edited: Mar 14, 2008 / Mar 14, 2008

Object ID: 5085

Hits: 7762 

 


Product Description

The Series 27 Trangia stoves are aimed at the lone walker or for small groups. A relatively small, compact stove that takes up minimal room in the rucksack. The pans are smaller than the Series 25 and the kettle is sized accordingly. Larger pans can be accommodated by raising the supports in the upper windshield.

For more info see the Trangia Website click here

To watch a short video on how to use them click here

Features

As well as being able to buy each part separately there are six sets in the Series 27 as follows

Trangia 27-1 UL
Ultralight Aluminium Stove
2 x 1.0 litre saucepans graded and ungraded,
1 x 18cm frying pan
Weight 720g

Trangia 27-2 UL
Ultralight Aluminium Stove
2 x 1.0 litre saucepans graded and ungraded
1 x 18cm frying pan
1 x 0.6 litre kettle
Weight 860g

Trangia 27-3 UL
Ultralight Aluminium Stove
2 x 1.0 litre saucepans graded and ungraded
1 x Non-stick 18cm frying pan
Weight 740g

Trangia 27-4 UL
Ultralight Aluminium Stove
2 x 1.0 litre saucepans graded and ungraded
1 x non-stick 18cm frying pan
1 x 0.6 litre kettle
Weight 880g

Trangia 27-5 UL
Ultralight Aluminium Stove
2 x non-stick 1.0 litre saucepans graded and ungraded
1 x non-stick 18cm frying pan
Weight 798g

Trangia 27-6 UL
Ultralight Aluminium Stove
2 x non-stick 1.0 litre saucepans graded and ungraded
1 x non-stick 18cm frying pan
1 x 0.6 litre kettle
Weight 938g.

General Comments

As someone who used to train teenagers for their Bronze and Silver Duke of Edinburgh awards I love these stoves. Every Scout pack in the UK and around the world probably has a tent load of them. They are truly a bomb proof stove, easy to set up, easy to use and totally reliable. Ideally suited to camping associated with trekking and hiking, their ability to pack into a single unit makes them very practical.

My only recommendation is to buy the gas adapter which speeds up the cooking time immensely.

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Reviews

Viewing: 1-3 of 3

mountainmanmarkExcellent

Voted 5/5

For camping whilst trekking or at base camp these stoves set the benchmark
Posted Mar 14, 2008 5:48 am

rggModel 3 UL

Voted 4/5

It's two best features are that it is very easy to operate and that it even works very well in stormy weather.

The recommended fuel is ethyl alcohol aka methylated spirts, which is avaiable almost all over the world, although in remote areas it can be somewhat problematic to find it. This fuel burns very clean. All sorts of other liquid fuels work too, but many of these lead to black pots.

The disadvantage of ethyl alcohol for cooking is that the caloric value is relatively low, hence it takes a while to get your water to boil. That said, if you're a bit careful, a liter of fuel (per person) can last for a week - mind you, when I discovered that, dinner always consisted of soup, double sized freeze dried meals and tea or coffee, so 'cooking' was never more complicated than boiling water. My experience with real cooking is limited, but at one time I managed to make one liter last for a 6-day trip - five dinners, five times tea for breakfast. For that, you have to plan ahead and bring food that doesn't need much time to cook (carrots, paprikas, salads, couscous, mashed potato powder ...)
Posted Jan 12, 2011 9:53 am

rggAddition to my review of Model 3 UL

Voted 4/5

Important addition: Over the last few months, I learned that alcohol is a poor fuel at altitude. At 4000m it was still manageable, but cooking at 5000m already took a very long time, and melting snow was virtually impossible - only after the better part of an hour I had managed to get half a liter of water.
To be clear, I'm not saying that the Trangia is not a good stove, just don't use it at altitude!
Posted Aug 12, 2011 8:03 pm

Viewing: 1-3 of 3