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Reynolds Peak
Mountain/Rock

Reynolds Peak

 
Reynolds Peak

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Utah, United States, North America

Lat/Lon: 40.66220°N / 111.6458°W

Object Title: Reynolds Peak

Elevation: 9422 ft / 2872 m

 

Page By: Joseph Bullough

Created/Edited: Jan 16, 2005 / May 9, 2013

Object ID: 153567

Hits: 9534 

Page Score: 86.18%  - 23 Votes 

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Overview

Reynolds Peak is the highest point on the short ridge which divides Butler Fork from Big Cottonwood Canyon. The peak lies a short distance to the west of Dog Lake, a popular summer hiking and mountain biking destination. The peak is easily accessible from Big Cottonwood on the south or Mill Creek Canyon on the north.

During the summer hiking season Reynolds Peak makes for an easy non-technical hike which can be completed in a couple of hours or less, an ideal summit destination for casual hikers. In the winter the peak and surrounding area is a very popular destination for backcountry skiiers, and also makes an excellent objective for winter snowshoeing, particularly when avalanche danger might make attempts at larger nearby peaks ill-advised.

The peak is a close neighbor of Little Water Peak, which lies approximately 1.25 miles to the northeast, on the opposite side of Dog Lake. The summit offers excellent views of all the summits comprising the Big Cottonwood Canyon ridge to the south.

USGS Quads:
  • Mount Aire, Utah (1:24k)
  • Salt Lake City, Utah (1:100k)


    Getting There

    There are several trailheads and routes which may be used for a climb of Reynolds Peak. The most common approach from Mill Creek Canyon is the Big Water Trail, while from the south Big Cottonwood Canyon includes the two common appoaches of Mill D North Fork and Butler Fork. Directions for these trailheads are as follows:

    Millcreek Canyon:
    Big Water Trailhead
    From I-215 on the east side of Salt Lake valley, take either the 3300 or 3900 South exit, and proceed east to Wasatch Boulevard. Follow Wasatch Boulevard to 3800 South, and look for signs to Mill Creek Canyon. Proceed 9.6 miles up Mill Creek Canyon to a parking area at the end of the road, and the Big Water Trailhead.

    Big Cottonwood Canyon:
    Mill D North Fork Trailhead
    From the 6200 South exit off I-215, head east and south on State Highway 190 for ±2 miles to the intersection with Big Cottonwood Canyon road. Turn left at the intersection and drive approximately 9.6 miles east to the Mill D North Fork Trailhead.

    Butler Fork Trailhead
    From the 6200 South exit off I-215, head east and south on State Highway 190 for ±2 miles to the intersection with Big Cottonwood Canyon road. Turn left at the intersection and drive approximately 8 miles east to the Butler Fork Trailhead and parking area, located on the left side of the road.


    Route Descriptions

    Big Water Trail
    This trail begins from the upper parking area at the end of the Mill Creek Canyon road. The trail is easy to follow and very popular, particularly in the summer when the trail is open to mountain bikes on even-numbered calendar days (plan your hike for an odd-numbered day to avoid sharing the trail with mountain bikers). The trail makes a number of switchbacks as it climbs generally southward. The trail reaches a junction where it converges with the Big Cottonwood Canyon Butler Fork Trail a short distance before arriving at Dog Lake.
    One-Way Hiking Distance: 2.1 miles
    Trailhead Elevation: 7,600 ft.
    Summit Elevation: 9,422 ft.
    Elevation Gain: 1,822 ft.
    Average Gain per Mile: 868 ft.
    Mill D North Fork
    This is the shorter of the two common approaches from Big Cottonwood Canyon. The trail is easy to follow and very popular, both as a summer hiking trail and winter ski and snowshoe trail. From the trailhead the trail climbs gradually northeast for approximately 1.5 miles to a trail junction. The right fork continues east to Lake desolation; take the left fork which continues another 0.6 miles northwest to Dog Lake.
    One-Way Hiking Distance: 2.7 miles
    Trailhead Elevation: 7,240 ft.
    Summit Elevation: 9,422 ft.
    Elevation Gain: 2,182 ft.
    Average Gain per Mile: 808 ft.
    Butler Fork
    This route is a slightly longer Big Cottonwood Canyon approach to Reynolds Peak. The trail climbs north for approximately 0.4 miles to a trail junction, with the left heading west into Mill A basin. Take the right fork which continues north before making a gradual bend to the east as it continues up Butler Fork. The trail reaches a junction where it converges with the Mill Creek Canyon Big Water Trail a short distance before arriving at Dog Lake.
    One-Way Hiking Distance: 2.9 miles
    Trailhead Elevation: 7,120 ft.
    Summit Elevation: 9,422 ft.
    Elevation Gain: 2,302 ft.
    Average Gain per Mile: 794 ft.
    All of the above three routes converge at Dog Lake (el. 8,740 ft.), with the summit of Reynolds Peak approximately 0.5 miles to the southwest. Due to heavy usage the area surrounding Dog Lake is somewhat of a maze of camp and use trails. The trail to the summit of Reynolds Peak is unmarked, but begins near the southwest corner of Dog Lake. The use trails to the south of the correct trail will eventually converge on the true trail, which departs from the west side of the main trail at approximately 445924E 4501767N (N40.66500° W111.63976°), el. 8760 ft. The ridge gradually bends westward just before arriving at the summit.

    Red Tape

    Mill Creek Canyon is a fee area. A toll booth is located approximately 1.5 miles up the canyon, and collects a fee of $3.00 per vehicle as you exit the canyon. Annual passes may also be purchased for $40.00.

    Prior to June 1 each year, a locked gate on Millcreek Canyon road prevents driving the final 3.9 miles to the trailhead. After June 1 the gate remains open until the first significant snowfall of the season.

    There are currently no fees required for approaches from Big Cottonwood Canyon.

    When To Climb

    Reynolds Peak can be ascended year round. Dry hiking can usually be found on the mountain by early to late May, depending on the snowpack, but snow may linger considerably longer on north facing approaches from Butler Fork and Mill Creek Canyon.

    Winter months allow for good backcountry skiing and snowshoeing on the mountain. There are several potential avalanche slide paths on the mountain and its various approaches; carefully assess snow conditions before any winter attempts.

    Mountain Conditions

    Weather forecast and current conditions for nearby Brighton Ski Resort.
  • Additions and Corrections

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    Viewing: 1-4 of 4    
    hgrapidDirections not clear enough

    hgrapid

    Voted 5/10

    We tried to hike Reynolds Peak based on your directions and the directions were not clear enough, so we had to turn back. You don't specify that A) There is no marked trail leading to Reynolds Peak and B) you have to guess where to go because there are numerous trails that go every which way from Dog Lake, and near Dog Lake. In fact, we believe the correct trail is near a sign before you reach Dog Lake. But, this page is not clear enough, and will too likely get more people lost.



    See this page: http://www.micksmtn.20m.com/reynolds.html

    On it, even they claim that there is a trail, but they couldn't find it. The reason is because it is not at all clear. So, on this page, you need to clarify. I can't justify any decent score until you rectify this so others do not get lost.
    Posted Jul 5, 2010 1:51 pm
    Joseph BulloughRe: Directions not clear enough

    Joseph Bullough

    Hasn't voted

    I added some additional info regarding the summit trail. Last Friday I also climbed Little Water Peak, for the first time under totally dry conditions, and unlike Reynolds Peak I was surprised to find no evidence of a trail to the summit. It was cross country and bushwhacking from Dog Lake to the summit.
    Posted Jul 6, 2010 9:12 am
    hgrapidRe: Directions not clear enough

    hgrapid

    Voted 5/10

    Thanks. Maybe give the coordinates in decimal so it is easy to plot. I am not sure the numbers you are using are more helpful in locating the trail. I think that will help.
    Posted Jul 6, 2010 3:09 pm
    Joseph BulloughRe: Directions not clear enough

    Joseph Bullough

    Hasn't voted

    I always use UTM coordinates, but I also added a conversion to decimal lat/long.
    Posted Jul 7, 2010 8:37 am

    Viewing: 1-4 of 4    

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