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The World
War I in the Dolomites, may 1915 - may 2015 The World War I in the Dolomites, may 1915 - may 2015  by AlbertoRampini

While the WWI broke out in 1914, the fighting on the alpine chain and on the Dolomites began about a year later, on 1915, May 24th, just a century ago, after the Italian war's declaration against the Austro-Ungarian Empire. Between 1914, July and 1918, November, the First World War involved the greatest world powers and some of the minor ones. It was initially an European war between Austro-Hungarian Empire, Germany and Ottoman Empire coalition opposed to other European countries, as United Kingdom, France, Russia and Italy, but with the subsequent involvement of the United States of America and Japan it became a full-scale war, taking the name of "World War" or "Great War". The Italian-Austrian border ran for 370 kilometers along the line drawn in 1866, an almost entirely mountainous border. The mountains were a natural bulwark in which, next to the two warring parties, a common enemy soon made its appearance: the winter at high altitude. Fighting involved different alpine and subalpine groups, as Adamello, Ortles-Cevedale, Carnian Alps and Little Dolomites, but unexpectedly the Dolomite front was the place where the war in altitude reached the limite of sacrifice. "A war within the war", where it was first of all necessary to survive the extreme environmental conditions, then to fight.

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Dog Our
Best Friend Dog Our Best Friend  by Liba Kopeckova

She gave me bravery on my first trips to Colorado Mountains. I am not sure if I would have been able to reach the summits without her. We spent many nights out alone, but we were not alone-- we had each other.

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The Machard Knot The Machard Knot  by ericvola

Although Serge Marchard died at just 18, he had the time and genius to give to the climbing community a magnificent gift, maybe today the most used auto-block, auto-jamming knot.

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The How To's of A Splattski The How To's of A Splattski  by Mlasky

From Mark Didier in recommending re-featuring this page:It's been on the front page before but it should be reposted and maybe SP can help save the world from the use of the dreaded term "selfie".

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So, you
want to climb Mt Rainier. So, you want to climb Mt Rainier.  by ExcitableBoy

Mount Rainier is a unique mountain within the contiguous United States. No other mountain is as extensively glaciated or has as prodigious a prominence. The scale and character of Mt. Rainier is more akin to an Alaskan or Andean peak. The highest trailhead requires the climber to gain 9,000 feet of elevation to reach the summit, as much as from Everest ABC to its summit. The weather on Mt. Rainier changes remarkably quickly, typically for the worse. Blizzards are not uncommon in August, and the high winds and moisture laden air sap heat and wilt down insulation. If you are planning an attempt on Rainier there are a few things you should know. Below are some tips I have gleaned from over two decades and dozens of climbs on ‘The Mountain’. Bear in mind that this article is not a substitute for proper instruction or experience. Mt. Rainier kills climbers almost every year.

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The History of SummitPost,
Volume V The History of SummitPost, Volume V  by Bob Sihler

Once upon an SP time, there were three awesome articles detailing the history of SummitPost (up through 2006).

Sadly, the author, a fine writer and once a highly prominent member of the site, deleted those submissions when he became angry with the site and deleted many of his pages and transferred some others. While most deleted pages here are no great loss in the grand scheme since they can be replaced or may not have had much value to begin with, the deletion of those articles was a real loss to SP because they were informative, well-written, and balanced. Newcomers have no good way now to learn the rich history of SummitPost, along with some of its greatest controversies, from its 2001 founding up until about 2006.

This article, and the one preceding it, is not an attempt to recreate those previous ones. As someone who was witness to and a player in many of the events involved with exploring those questions, I am trying to be as objective as possible but realize there may be sharply different viewpoints. I encourage readers to read the comments as well, for there they may see some of those different perspectives.

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The
Aftermath, Josh's accident in the Canadian Rockies The Aftermath, Josh's accident in the Canadian Rockies  by gimpilator

Have you ever seen a fellow climber fall down a mountain slope? I have. Six times. Perhaps it was your friend, or someone you know. Have you ever seen someone hit by rockfall? I have. Four times. Have you ever triggered an avalanche? I did once. In the last 10 years of outdoor exploration I have ascended 650 peaks and during that time I have witnessed about 10 injuries. Three of them were serious, but only this one was life threatening.

It's no fun bandaging up a bloodied friend or helping someone hobble down a peak. For those of us who travel in the mountains, certain objective hazards pose higher risk and claim lives on a regular basis. These include but are not limited to avalanche, cornice, and rockfall. We do what we can to minimize this risk but it's not going to keep us at home on the weekend watching the TV. On Mount Cory, in August of 2014, I triggered a large rock which nearly killed one of my best friends, despite our attempt at precautions.

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The History of SummitPost,
Volume IV The History of SummitPost, Volume IV  by Bob Sihler

This article, and the one to follow it, is not an attempt to recreate those previous ones. As someone who joined in 2004 and didn't really become active until the fall of 2006, I just do not have the firsthand knowledge to document what those articles covered. Also, this article is not going to go into every significant change and event on SP since the times those articles spanned. Instead, its focus is on one of two questions I and many others have asked many times.

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How To Leave SP How To Leave SP  by Bob Sihler

Over the years that I have been a member here, I've seen many departures, some more memorable than others, and it has led me to conclude that if you decide to leave SP, you should do so in style instead of going quietly, which is no fun for anyone and virtually assures that you will soon be forgotten.

Hopefully, this article will provide some useful tips for how to make your exit from SP one for the memories!

There are two essential components to a good public breakup with SP: flaming in the forum and deleting your material. Let's examine the two in more detail.

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Pioneering
Revisited:Remembering the Legends of Climbing on the Grand Pioneering Revisited:Remembering the Legends of Climbing on the Grand  by JRB

Pioneering spirit is fed by achievement, the more difficult the challenge, the more satisfying the process. Falling short whets the appetite for more. Failure is not to be feared, because in failing one proves that the planned objectives are not assured. There is just something about climbing the Grand; following in the footsteps of the forerunners of climbing. Our visit to the Grand Teton in 2014 caused an adrenaline surge in our novice group, not only because of its’ deep history, but the challenges that the volcanically formed Tetons serves up to rookies.

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