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Mount Alyeska
Mountain/Rock

Mount Alyeska

 
Mount Alyeska

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Alaska, United States, North America

Lat/Lon: 60.95628°N / 149.05804°W

Object Title: Mount Alyeska

Elevation: 3939 ft / 1201 m

 

Page By: climber46

Created/Edited: Oct 27, 2005 / Dec 7, 2011

Object ID: 154877

Hits: 10475 

Page Score: 81.76%  - 14 Votes 

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Overview

Mount Alyeska is more widely known for its downhill ski area, but it is also a worthy destination for a ¼ to ½ day hike. Standing 3,939 feet above Turnagain Arm at sea level, Mount Alyeska has superb views of Turnagain Arm, the Girdwood valley, several nearby glaciers, and many mountains and glaciers of the high Chugach Range to the north and east. One great thing about this mountain is its accessibility-you do not have to walk many miles on an approach and you can climb with limited time. The other really great thing about this climb is climbing the knife edge ridge to the top. The drops on either side range from falling 2000 feet to the Girdwood valley on one side or falling around 150 feet into a crevasse of the Mt. Alyeska Glacier, both equally unpleasant options.

Getting There

From Anchorage, take the Seward Highway south for about 36 miles. Turn right at Girdwood and follow the signs for Alyeska resort. From the point where you turn right you can see breathtaking Mount Alyeska and its many ski runs. You can either start at the bottom of the ski area and hike up or ride the aerial tramway to about halfway up the mountain.

Red Tape

You can just hike up the ski runs or you can pay $16 ($14 for Alaska residents) to ride the aerial tramway halfway up in the summer season.

When To Climb

With the exposure on this route, summer is the only time this route is safe for nontechnical climbers. In summer, this route is safest when attempted solo, due to loose rock. It would add risk if rocks are knocked loose by another climber above, or if you dislodge a rock that a person below must dodge.

Camping

Mount Alyeska is most appropriate as a day hike, but if you proceeded further into the wilderness, I am sure that the opotions are limitless. Much of the surrounding area is part of Chugach National Forest, and you would need to check with the US Forest Service for specific regulations.

Mountain Conditions

http://www.alyeskaresort.com/page.asp?intNodeID=11316


Important Safety Information

Because the mountain is actively used as a ski area during the winter and spring, avalanche control is required. Avalanche control results in using mortars to shoot the mountain in an effort to bring down the heavy loads of snow. Sometimes these mortars do not explode on impact and can be found when the snows melt in the summer months. DO NOT TOUCH ANY MORTARS and, if found, report their locations to an Alyeska Ski Resort employee.

The ridge above the tram has shrapnel from these mortars all along the route to Point 3939. Information courtesy of Steve Gruhn.

External Links



Additions and Corrections

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Viewing: 1-4 of 4    
climber46Untitled Comment

climber46

Hasn't voted

Steve,





I incorporated your information onto the main Alyeska page. Thanks-that could be a lifesaver for someone. Climber46
Posted Nov 13, 2005 8:30 am
Steve GruhnUntitled Comment

Voted 9/10

There is some debate in the local mountaineering community as to whether Point 3939 (labeled Mount Alyeska on the USGS maps) is the summit of Mount Alyeska or whether Peak 4423 to the east is the true summit. Peak 4423 has been referred to as both True Summit and the True Summit of Mount Alyeska. It is now officially known as Hibbs Peak.





http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?z=6&n=6758397&e=388969&s=25&size=l&datum=nad83&layer=DRG25





The glacier west of Point 3939 is the Alyeska Glacier.
Posted Oct 31, 2005 4:09 pm
Steve GruhnUntitled Comment

Voted 9/10

Because the mountain is actively used as a ski area during the winter and spring, avalanche control is required. Avalanche control results in using mortars to shoot the mountain in an effort to bring down the heavy loads of snow. Sometimes these mortars do not explode on impact and can be found when the snows melt in the summer months. DO NOT TOUCH ANY MORTARS and, if found, report their locations to an Alyeska Ski Resort employee.





The ridge above the tram has shrapnel from these mortars all along the route to Point 3939.
Posted Oct 31, 2005 4:13 pm
climber46Untitled Comment

climber46

Hasn't voted

Steve,





I incorporated your information onto the main Alyeska page. Thanks-that could be a lifesaver for someone. Climber46
Posted Nov 13, 2005 8:30 am

Viewing: 1-4 of 4    

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