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Trappers Peak
Mountain/Rock

Trappers Peak

 
Trappers Peak

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Washington, United States, North America

Lat/Lon: 48.68826°N / 121.32269°W

Object Title: Trappers Peak

County: Whatcom

Activities: Hiking, Scrambling

Season: Summer, Fall

Elevation: 5966 ft / 1818 m

 

Page By: gimpilator

Created/Edited: Sep 2, 2009 / Sep 4, 2013

Object ID: 548777

Hits: 4857 

Page Score: 79.04%  - 10 Votes 

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Overview

Pickets Panorama
The Southern Pickets Seen from The Summit


Trappers Peak is what some hikers might call low-hanging-fruit, with it's relatively easy access and spectacular views of the North Cascades. It makes an excellent choice for a day trip but it can also be combined with a night at Thornton Lakes or other peaks such as nearby X Mountain, Thornton Peak, or Mount Triumph.

Mounts Triumph & Despair from Trappers Peak
Triumph and Despair Seen From The Summit


There are several amazing sights that draw people to this particular summit. The impressive east face of of Mount Triumph rises 500 vertical feet above a broken-up, receding glacier. Another sight worth seeing is the jaw-dropping view of the southern Pickets Range, located just 5 miles to the north. As you may know, getting a good view of the Pickets is somewhat of a rarity.  That is part of what makes Trappers Peak special.  Furthermore, it has been said that Trappers is a personal favorite of local peakbagging legend John Roper.  This is the peak that started his obsession/passion.  So watch out!  It could happen to you too.

Thornton Lakes, Mount Triumph and Trappers Peak
Thornton Lakes


The standard route makes use of the Thornton Lakes trail and then branches off to follow the south ridge of the peak. There is some mild exposure but only a few class 3 moves are required to reach the summit. Bears and berries are commonly encountered in the summer months. Only experienced climbers should attempt a winter ascent.

Standard Route - South Ridge

The trail starts off with a very gentle grade with a couple of creek crossings as you make your way through forest for 2.3 miles. Ascend steadily climbing switchbacks for the next couple of miles. The trail then begins to mellow out a bit as you traverse some alpine meadows chock full of blueberry bushes. Near the ridge top, watch for a boot path branching off to the right to Trappers Peak. The main trail goes left down to the campsites at the lake.

Exposed Ridge
The Narrow Section Of The Ssouth Ridge


The trail down to the lake is a knee bashing descent of just over half a mile down to the only real obstacle you'll meet on the whole trail. There are some huge, down-sloping boulders and a log jam to negotiate before you can finally drop your pack at camp, 5.2 miles from the trailhead.

Trappers Tarn
A Tarn On The South Ridge


The boot path to Trappers Peak ascends about 1000 feet along a beautiful ridge/blueberry buffet that offers beautiful views of the lakes, Triumph, Despair, Forbidden, Torment, the Pickets and everything in between. a few easy class 3 moves along a semi-knife-edge keep things interesting and before you know it, you're on top. For those who plan to continue on to X Mountain, keep in mind it's not as bad as it looks.

Driving Directions

Coming from the western Washington, take hwy 20 east to Marblemount and proceed and 11 miles towards Newhalem. Turn left on to Thornton Lakes Road and drive 5 miles to the end of the road where the trailhead is located. The road is a bit rough but passable with a 2wd if you drive carefully.

Vertical Drop
The Precipitous North Face

Red Tape / Camping

Pick up a permit at the Marblemount Ranger Station if you plan to stay overnight. They also have a voluntary climber's registry. There are only 3 camp sites at Thornton Lakes so arrive early if you want a permit on the weekend. The campsite at lower Thornton Lake has a composting toilet. Be sure to hang your food.

External Links

North Cascades National Parks Service - Thornton Lakes Trail

Mt. Triumph in winter. Photo...
Triumph Seen From The Summit In Winter


Images