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UN 9245
Mountain/Rock

UN 9245

 
UN 9245

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Colorado, United States, North America

Lat/Lon: 38.30890°N / 105.2831°W

Object Title: UN 9245

County: Fremont

Activities: Hiking

Season: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter

Elevation: 9245 ft / 2818 m

 

Page By: Sarah Simon

Created/Edited: May 16, 2011 / Dec 16, 2013

Object ID: 716289

Hits: 986 

Page Score: 80.49%  - 12 Votes 

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Overview

 
East from the summit
East from the summit


UN 9245 is not a grand peak. It doesn’t even have a name. But it is a ranked Colorado peak with more than 300 feet of prominence and it affords the visitors fine views, especially to the southeast, south and southwest. The peak sits not far from the Tanner Trail, making it easily accessible and requiring only minor off-trail travel to reach the summit. While few would go out of their way to make UN 9245 their primary day’s destination, it makes a nice side trip on the way to or from nearby Curley Peak.

The lower reaches of UN 9245 near the Tanner Trail are blanketed in dark stands of Fir trees, a mix of large, mature trees with dense, nearly impenetrable stands of young trees. But the summit of this modest little peak is mostly open, and the visitor can take in fine views from the bare summit boulders. Vistas include the golden plains to the east, neighboring Wet Mountain summits, and the stunning Sangre de Cristo Mountains to the southwest and west.

Rank: 2771st highest peak in Colorado
Prominence: 345 feet
USGS Quad: Curley Peak

Rank & Prominence Source: Lists of John

Getting There

 
Dense fir
Dense fir on the northern slopes
 
Northwest from summit
Northwest from summit


UN 9245 sits in far southern Fremont County, about 10 miles south of Cañon City, Colorado and 35 miles east as the crow flies from Pueblo, Colorado. Most visitors to this humble little peak will access the mountain via Oak Creek Road (CR 143) running south out of Cañon City. The peak can be accessed via Bear Gulch from the East Bear Trailhead.

Red Tape

 
About the raptors
About the raptors
 
Respect the Raptors
Respect the raptors
 
Nearing the summit rocks
Nearing the summit rocks
 
UN 9245 from the north
UN 9245 from the north



There are no use or parking fees in the vicinity of UN 9245. Note that the trails in this area see heavy ATV use, particularly in the summer months.

No rock climbing is permitted between 1 April and 1 August each year. Please respect this National Forest Service closure designed to protect nesting Peregrine Falcons.

Per the Forest Service: Peregrines are very sensitive to disturbances near their nest of eyrie during the breeding and nesting season, and therefore the cliff area north of Trail #1333 is closed to all unauthorized human activity between April 1 and August 1 to protect the nesting falcons.

Please do not set a poor example and endanger these creatures by climbing in this area during the designated closure. During my visit in early April 2011, at least two rock climbing parties were shaming all of us by walking brazenly past the seasonal closure sign and climbing the restricted cliffs. The southern Pikes Peak region and area around Cañon City abounds with rock climbing opportunities. Please do not be a selfish pig and climb during the closure period. In addition causing harm to the birds, you harm the reputation of your fellow climbers in the eyes of other recreationalists.

Camping

 
UN 9245 from Curley Peak
UN 9245 from Curley Peak
 
South from the summit
South from the summit


The Oak Creek Campground, operated by the National Forest Service, is less than 1 mile southwest on CR 143 from the East Bear Trailhead. The campground sits at 7,600 feet above sea level features 16 camp sites and a vault toilet. Presently, there is no fee for staying at this campground.

Weather & Seasons

 
Opposite side of Bear Creek
Opposite side of Bear Creek

 
Oak Creek Valley
Oak Creek Valley

 
UN 9245 summit area
UN 9245 summit area
 
Southwest from the summit
Southwest from the summit



The Wet Mountains generally tend to be warmer and drier than most mountain ranges in Colorado. (They are considered "wet" compared to the arid Pueblo and Cañon City areas, however.)

Summer: Expect summers to be relatively hot compared to other mountainous areas of Colorado. ATV and trailbike crowds are thick in this area in the summer.

Fall: The autumn leaf display in the Wet Mountains is simply spectacular. In addition the ubiquitous golden-hued Aspen, these mountains also boast thick stands of orange-to-crimson Gambel Oak.

Winter: Nowhere near as high or steep as the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to their west, many of the Wet Mountain summits sit below timberline. Combined with a generally smaller snow-pack, much (though not all!) of the Wet Mountains can be enjoyed in snow season without that tingling fear of avalanche experienced in much of the Colorado high country.

Spring:The Wet Mountains, despite their name, generally tend to be warmer and drier than most mountain ranges in Colorado.

Images