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Greenhorn Mountain

 
Greenhorn Mountain

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Colorado, United States, North America

Lat/Lon: 37.88150°N / 105.0133°W

Object Title: Greenhorn Mountain

Elevation: 12347 ft / 3763 m

 

Page By: Grant

Created/Edited: Aug 12, 2002 / Nov 30, 2012

Object ID: 151134

Hits: 28623 

Page Score: 85.46%  - 21 Votes 

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GREENHORN MOUNTAIN OVERVIEW

Greenhorn Mountain resides in the Wet Mountain Range. It has the honors of being the ranges high point as well as the highest point for Pueblo county. The Wet Mountains are one of Colorado’s lower ranges (when compared to other major ranges in Colorado) with an elevation topping out at just over 12,000 feet. It spans for fifty miles in a north-south direction beginning at the Arkansas River near Canon City and ending at the Huerfano River just north of Walsenburg. If traveling on I-25 Greenhorn’s Mountain dominates the view to the west between Pueblo and Walsenburg.

Although the summit just nudges above the timberline at 12,347 and only ranks as the 1,107 highest peak in the state. There isn’t a higher mountain for over forty miles. So Greenhorn’s summit provides a wonderful 360 degree view, and actually ranks as Colorado’s 11th most prominent peak (thanks to Ryan Schilling here). The endless vista of the Great Plains makes up the views to the east. The spectacular and rugged looking Sangre de Cristo Mountains dominate the view to the west. Looking south the Spanish Peaks with their twin looking summits rule your vision, and Pikes Peak makes its appearance to the north.

Greenhorn Mtn was named after the great Comanche Chief Greenhorn or Cuero Verde who resided in the area. In 1779 a battle between the Comanche Indians and the Spanish Governor de Anza was fought on the slopes of Greenhorn Mtn, near what today is Rye. De Anza was able to defeat Cuero Verde and ended up killing him and four of his sub-chiefs. Thus after this point in time the area was as referred as "the Greenhorn" or "Greenhorn Valley".

The Wet Mountains are void of any spectacular looking peaks like their neighbors to the west and offer few opportunities for rock climbing. What Greenhorn lacks in ferocious looking summits it offers abundant wildlife, five ecosystems and solitude. Although it’s in close proximity to a major freeway and areas of substantial population. It is typically bypassed by many outdoor enthusiasts for the Sangre de Cristo’s or the Spanish Peaks. Only during the hunting season is the area busy, so an orange hat is recommended during this time of year.

GREENHORN MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS

In 1993 the 22,000 acre Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness was designated after a 20 year wait. No other wilderness area in Colorado offers such a vast display of the ecosystem. Starting at the prairies near 7,600 feet and traveling all the way to the alpine tundra at over 12,000 feet. It is also one of the most remote and lightly used wilderness areas in the state and doesn’t contain a single lake. The area is small, steep and relatively dry. There are only eleven miles of trail most of which reside in the northern and eastern sections. The entire southern section of the wilderness is trail less and offers a truly pristine experience for the person who likes total solitude. The threatened greenback cutthroat trout resides in the South Apache Creek, in addition, the area is prime habitat for Big Horn Sheep, Mule Deer and Elk.

BISHOPS CASTLE

One who spends the time to explore Greenhorn Mountain should stop at Bishops Castle. It’s located a few miles north of San Isabel in Colo Hwy 165. This castle is the undertaking of one man's own mussel and sweat who started it in 1969. For the past fifteen years, I stop by every time to see the progression of the large granite structure. Anyone can wonder throughout the castle for free, although donations are appreciated. On many occasions he will be working away and will kindly answer any questions you may have.

TRAILHEADS

Due to the amount of driving involved to get to the upper trailhead. Owning the Colorado Atlas and Gazetter by DeLorme will help in the aiding.

Upper Greenhorn Trail Trailhead:
This is the standard and easiest way to the summit. It is a long drive and involves numerous miles on gravel roads.
From I-25, exit onto Colorado Hwy 165 (exit 74) go west through Colorado City, Rye, San Isabel, and Bishops Castle. At a hairpin turn left onto Forest Service road 400 or Ophir Creek Rd, pass the turn off to the Ophir Creek campground and veering left after 1.25 miles. Finally after 7.5 miles you will come upon a four-way junction. Turn left onto FR403 or Greenhorn Road, travel for an additional 15 miles to the end of the road where there is a parking area. This is the trailhead and there is sign marking the trail.

Lower GreenhornTrail Trailhead:
From I-25, exit onto Colorado Hwy 165 (exit 74) go west through Colorado City for 8 miles to Rye. Instead of veering to the right on Colo 165 go straight into the small town on Main Street which soon turns into Park Rd. From the turn off of Hwy 165 travel for 0.8 miles to a Y in the road veer right onto Cuerna Verde Rd. Heading west and then turning south. After 1.6 miles there will be a small parking lot with a bridge crossing over Greenhorn Creek. This is the trailhead.

Bartlett Trail:


CAMPING AND LODGING

Excellent camping spots are scattered all along the Greenhorn Mtn road. There are also quite a few National Forest campgrounds in the area. The closest one is Ophir Creek Campground, others in the area include Davenport and San Carlos.

Colorado City has a hotel just off the I-25 exit and is the closest to the trailheads. Westcliffe and Walsenburg are in the area as well and offer abundant lodging.


RED TAPE

Greenhorn Mountain’s summit is in a Wilderness Area so the typical rules apply, but the majority of the mountain is in national forest. There are no permits required, and no use, or parking fees to climb Greenhorn Mtn.

Wilderness rules

Hunting season:
The Wet Mountains get bombarded with people wondering around all over the place in there orange jackets during hunting season. Between Sept. and Mid-November is probably the busiest time of the year for this mountain range. I highly suggest taking something that is reflective, like a fluorescent orange hat during this time of year.

Mountain Conditions:
The forest service closes the Ophir Creek road in the winter a few miles past the turn off of Colo. Hwy 165. They try to have it open by Memorial day and close it after the hunting season. For more information or current mountain conditions contact the Pike & San Isabel National Forest contact:
2840 Kachina Drive
Pueblo, CO 81008
719-553-1400


External Links

Additions and Corrections

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Viewing: 1-8 of 8    
Larry VUntitled Comment

Larry V

Voted 10/10

Just a minor correction: the Huerfano County high point is Blanca Peak, not Greenhorn.
Posted Jul 1, 2005 7:21 pm
GrantUntitled Comment

Grant

Hasn't voted

Thanks Larry, I guess that would be pretty major to some people. Will change right now.
Posted Jul 1, 2005 11:11 pm
The Lower MarmotUntitled Comment

The Lower Marmot

Voted 10/10

"This castle is the undertaking of one man's own mussel and sweat who started it in 1969"





I think that muscle is what you were looking for here. Your work on this page has been excellent, but there are a few choppy or confusing sentences spread throughout, and it could probably use a little bit more proofreading. If you'd like, I could email you some more specific sentences, but I'm not going to put in the time right now.





Thanks for the revamp!


Sam
Posted Jul 1, 2005 11:26 pm
cftbqBartlett Trail

cftbq

Hasn't voted

The trailhead for the Bartlett Trail is reached by taking Boulder Ave. south from Main St. in Rye. After about 1 mi., when forced to turn, turn left (east) onto CR 264 (Greenhorn Rd.). Take it to the first right, which is CR 271 (again) and signed as Hunter Rd. Turn right (south). Follow Hunter till forced to turn again, then go left (west) on Baxter Rd. After about half a mile, Baxter ends, and the road turns south, which is the beginning of Bartlett Trail Rd. Follow it as it twists south and west all the way to its end at the NF boundary. There is a good sized parking area and a sign denoting the trailhead. This road is dirt, but navigable by almost any car once it is clear of snow.

From here, the Bartlett Trail climbs steep drainages west and south. The Forest Service has abandoned all maintenance, so vegetation is threatening to obscure or reclaim the trail in several places. However, as of 2010, it is still not hard to follow, although rough in places.

The visible trail finally peters out near timberline, with the summit of Greenhorn in view. A short venture to the north-northwest through a last stand of trees must be made before the summit becomes visible again. Climb to the summit by whatever route seems best: The direct approach is steep and somewhat rocky, but a counter-clockwise ascending traverse gains the east ridge with a more gentle slope.
Posted Jun 27, 2010 11:09 pm
cftbqBartlett Trail

cftbq

Hasn't voted

The trailhead for the Bartlett Trail is reached by taking Boulder Ave. south from Main St. in Rye. After about 1 mi., when forced to turn, turn left (east) onto CR 264 (Greenhorn Rd.). Take it to the first right, which is CR 271 (again) and signed as Hunter Rd. Turn right (south). Follow Hunter till forced to turn again, then go left (west) on Baxter Rd. After about half a mile, Baxter ends, and the road turns south, which is the beginning of Bartlett Trail Rd. Follow it as it twists south and west all the way to its end at the NF boundary. There is a good sized parking area and a sign denoting the trailhead. This road is dirt, but navigable by almost any car once it is clear of snow.

From here, the Bartlett Trail climbs steep drainages west and south. The Forest Service has abandoned all maintenance, so vegetation is threatening to obscure or reclaim the trail in several places. However, as of 2010, it is still not hard to follow, although rough in places.

The visible trail finally peters out near timberline, with the summit of Greenhorn in view. A short venture to the north-northwest through a last stand of trees must be made before the summit becomes visible again. Climb to the summit by whatever route seems best: The direct approach is steep and somewhat rocky, but a counter-clockwise ascending traverse gains the east ridge with a more gentle slope.
Posted Jun 27, 2010 11:10 pm
EleutherosForest Road # Changes

Eleutheros

Voted 10/10

The forest service has changed a lot of the road numbers in the Wet Mountains. If you google a route to Greenhorn Mountain, you will find correct names so you can update the approach info. Thanks for making this page!
Posted Jul 23, 2012 6:38 pm
GrantRe: Forest Road # Changes

Grant

Hasn't voted

Thanks for the update, I'll change the page.
Posted Nov 30, 2012 12:56 am
aversawBartlett Trail Summit, 07/2013

Hasn't voted

The Bartlett Trail still works, allowing for all the caveats stated above. The trail is a nice place to see Dusky Grouse and gently takes you to where your eyes can take you the rest of the way (but do make sure you know how to get back to the trail on the way down). Tom Warren's 100 Hikes in Colorado book says the trail is 5.5 miles long. It's almost certainly longer than that from trailhead to summit. Probably more like seven miles.
Posted Jul 12, 2013 8:07 pm

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