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Antoinette Peak
Mountain/Rock

Antoinette Peak

 
Antoinette Peak

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Wyoming, United States, North America

Lat/Lon: 43.39438°N / 110.40959°W

Object Title: Antoinette Peak

County: Teton County

Activities: Mountaineering

Season: Summer

Elevation: 11407 ft / 3477 m

 

Page By: wyopeakMike

Created/Edited: Nov 22, 2008 / Nov 29, 2009

Object ID: 465474

Hits: 4779 

Page Score: 89.3%  - 29 Votes 

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Overview

Antoinette Peak
A summit view from near Corner Peak 7-4-09
Antoinette and Open Door Peaks
Antoinette Peak and Open Door Peak from Granite Creek Road in May 08
Antoinette is one of those mountains that can sort of be defined as a perfect peak, at least for me. It is tall, higher then most of its immediate neighbors. It has that perfect pyramid shape from many angles. It is steep on all sides, with no trails leading up to it's summit. The summit is a small barren area, where you feel on top of the world.
Most of all it is located in the high and wild Gros Ventre Range, which is incredibly rugged and beautiful. It is in prime wildlife habitat, with elk, deer, moose, bears, lions and most other mammals found in this part of Wyoming.
One side of the mountain drains into the lovely and aptly named Swift Creek. It is also on the divide between Granite and Crystal Creeks, two incredible watersheds.
Supposedly named because of the French trappers who were once here, the name is an elegant compliment to the fine lines on this majestic peak. When you first begin the drive on the Granite Hot Springs road, a lovely pyramid of a peak stands on the skyline in front of you. This is the great Antoinette, standing tall in the middle of a great wilderness. The road makes access easy in the summer, but it still is a good hike to the summit. The Swift Creek Trail is a no nonsense trail that gets you up into the high country quickly. It is a beautiful hike from a lovely forest, up to timberline, then above to the divide.

Getting There

 
high Gros Ventres
MacLeod Peak, left of center, and Shoal Peak on the right, Shoal Peak is also known as Flying Buttress
Antoinette Peak
close up of the summit
 
Antoinette Peak from the trail
A view of the summit from the Swift Creek Trail
The peak can be accessed from Crystal Creek to the north, but that is a much longer approach. The easiest way is from the Granite Hot Springs area SW of the peak.
From highway 191 in the Hoback Canyon, turn left at the intersection for Granite Hot Springs. Follow the road for close to nine miles, turning right at the second bridge over Granite Creek. Look for the Safari Club sign, and trailhead parking. There is a sign with information in the parking area describing the Wilderness area, and small sign pointing to the Swift Creek trail.
A mile past the turnoff is the developed campground. If you continue almost to the end of the road, there is an incredible place to view Granite Falls. When it is high water, these falls are huge and roaring, well worth a look.
At roads end, is Granite Hot Springs, a hot sulfur pool, for a small charge, a great place to relax.
Below the falls is a small hot spring across the river which can be accessed from the other side. Look for the small rock walls, and sometimes people sitting in it.

Red Tape

Open Door from Antoinette
An awesome view of Open Door Peak from below the summit of Antoinette Peak
The Tetons
The spectacular Teton view from the summit of Antoinette. Center foreground is Pyramid Peak, and on the right is the Sleeping Indian
Antoinette Peak is located in the Gros Ventre Wilderness area. Any rules and regs are on the Wilderness map. This is Grizzly country, so be prepared. I have not seen one here, but I have seen some very big scat on the flanks of the peak.

Camping

Antoinette Peak
A great view from near Corner Peak, July 4,2009
There is lots of camping on the Granite Creek road. There is a develped campground near the end of the road. There are many undevelped sites all the way up the road.
There are some excellent backcountry possibilites on the hike up. I have camped a little way below the divide, there are nice clumps of trees for protection and some little springs around most of the year for water.

Images