Quail Springs, Panorama, Samuelsons Rock Loop

Page Type
Route
Location:
California, United States, North America
Route Type:
Hiking
Season:
Spring, Fall, Winter
Time Required:
Most of a day
Difficulty:
Hike

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Quail Springs, Panorama, Samuelsons Rock Loop
Created On: Jan 30, 2016
Last Edited On: Oct 27, 2017

Overview

Quail Springs Trail starts at Quail Springs Trailhead on Park Boulevard. It follows an old abandoned dirt road/dry wash 3 miles west over a desert plain into a mountainous area. It then goes into a valley between the mountains, turns northwest and continues to follow the dry wash. Trails Illustrated Map of Joshua tree National Park shows a network of trails crisscrossing the mountains and the valleys of the area. These trails are poorly established/non-existent and do not appear on the official map of the park. They did however appear on my GPS map. Using my GPS, I was able to follow the faint Panorama Trail going 900 vertical feet up the mountains and then down to Big Foot Trail and Samuelsons Rock. In the 1920s, a Swedish immigrant homesteaded here for a few years. His inscriptions can be found carved into a rock face known as Samuelsons Rock. Returning to Quail Springs Trail, I made a 14.9 mile long loop hike.



The black line shows the path that I should have taken. I got off track for some time on Panorama Trail.

Getting There

From the park’s West Entrance drive 5.5 miles on Park Boulevard to Quail Springs Parking Area.

Route Description

This is a 14.9 mile lollipop loop hike. Lowest elevation is 3370 ft and highest elevation is 4270 ft. As mentioned above some of the trails are poorly defined or even non-existent in part. See map for detailed distances.

MapMap


From the west end of the Quail Springs parking area get on the quail Springs Trail and head west. The trail follows an abandoned dirt road on the surface of a desert plain. A dry wash parallels the road for some time and may be confused with the trail.

On Quail Sprins Trail
On Quail Springs Trail
On Quail Springs Trail
On Quail Springs Trail
On Quail Springs Trail
On Quail Springs Trail


After 2.3 miles you will see a valley between the mountains to the south. Johnny Lang Connector Trail goes south into this valley. Continue straight on the trail/dry wash toward the mountains to the west.

On Quail Springs Trail
Quail Springs Trail following the wash
On Quail Springs Trail
On Quail Springs Trail


The trail/wash goes into a valley between the mountains and turns northwest.

On Quail Springs Trail
Quail Springs Trail


Continuing down the dry wash, you will see a two headed hill identified on USGS Map as “Mary”.

The hill known as  Mary Mary


Beyond this area, trails became difficult to identify. I just followed the lines on my GPS showing the trails. On the north side of “Mary”, I turned east onto a connecting dry wash where Panorama Trail was and followed the wash up into the mountains.

West end of Panorama TrailLooking up the valley where Panorama Trail goes


Farther up, a canyon formed. The trail followed the bottom of the canyon.

On Panorama Trail
On Panorama Trail


A Cairn marked the spot where I had to leave the bottom of the canyon. A faint trail could then be followed to the crest of the mountains.

From the high point of Panorama TrailFrom the high point, looking west


The faint trail then took me down the east side of the mountains to reach Big Foot Trail which was nothing more than a dry wash.

Looking east from Panorama TrailLooking east


I followed the wash south toward Samuelsons Rock.

On Big Foot Trail
On Big Foot Trail
On Big Foot Trail
On Big Foot Trail
On Big Foot Trail
On Big Foot Trail


Samuelsons Rock.

Samuelson RockSamuelsons Rock


Trails Illustrated Maps and my GPS showed a trail going east from Samuelsons Rock. I did not actually see such a trail but followed my GPS on the desert floor to reach a home site.

Old home siteOld home site


From there, I turned south onto a trail that took me back to Quail Springs Trail.

When to Hike

Summer can be dangerously hot. Spring, fall and winter are good times.