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Foehn
effect Foehn effect  by visentin

Foehn, or Föhn in German, refer to a warm southerly wind coming over the Alps. However, the word is nowadays used to describe similar meteorological effects on all mountains all over the world.

For the anecdote, some time ago, the AEG german brand used "Fön" as a name for their electrical hairdriers. Subsequently that brand name has replaced the generic word and is now used in german for all electrical hairdriers.

Coming back to to topic, many mountaineers often use the expression "effect of Foehn" without really knowing its meaning. Let's try to understand how this phenomenon is working.

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Centennial
Series: A History of Glacier National Park’s Passes: Part II Centennial Series: A History of Glacier National Park’s Passes: Part II  by FlatheadNative

Visit Glacier National Park just once and it will be easy to understand what drew man to this area for many centuries. Glacier National Park emanates wonder, it smells of natural history, it oozes geology and its beauty is like a Siren calling us to come closer and see more.

This place called Glacier has held many of us in its grasp and the allure of her peaks. Her passes and valleys have beckoned and call us back time and time again. It seems that we just can’t get enough of this place that is called “The Crown of The Continent”. I call it a “Glimpse of Heaven on Earth”.

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Centennial
Series: A History of Glacier National Park’s Passes: Part I Centennial Series: A History of Glacier National Park’s Passes: Part I  by FlatheadNative

The history of Glacier National Park is replete with the traces of Native American life from before the turn of the 20th century. Native Americans have occupied or used Glacier National Park since well before the 19th century. Oral histories date back past written history which mentions the Blackfeet as early as 1789.

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Home Is Where the Heartache
Is Home Is Where the Heartache Is  by Bob Sihler

It is dawn in Yellowstone, again. I love dawn here. It is not just because the traffic, especially the RV and bus traffic, has not arrived yet. It is not just because of the glow the early sunlight casts on the trees, meadows, hills, and mountains; or because of the mist that rises from the streams and turns a blinding white as the sunbeams strike it. It is because the world has begun again, the primordial world, a few remaining slivers of which Greater Yellowstone, along with just a handful of other places in the world, preserves in hoped-for perpetuity.

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A Guide to
Piscatorial Acts in the Wilderness A Guide to Piscatorial Acts in the Wilderness  by FlatheadNative

Multiday climbing in the mountains presents many options of overnight accommodations. While perching on the side of a mountain or staying a hut certainly has its advantages for a high start as well as enjoyable sunrise/sunset options; others enjoy spending evenings and mornings around the shores of a mountain lake. For those who desire this type of approach the options for how to spend that time are endless such as staying in the tent and reading a good book, playing cards or spending time in great conversation with friends. Perhaps a more enjoyable pursuit would be to bring a fly rod and spend some time fishing for trout.

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Insatiable
Appetite for the Mountains (A Long Journey Home) Insatiable Appetite for the Mountains (A Long Journey Home)  by Deltaoperator17

Nobody told me the mountains were going to be this addictive. Mid Life Crisis . . . here I come. As a teenager growing up in Eugene Oregon, the region offered endless activities. Of course I am referencing the backcountry possibilities. The McKenzie highway is a yellow brick road of opportunity.

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When Good
Hiking Trails Go Bad When Good Hiking Trails Go Bad  by DamOTclese

What happens when a much used hiking trail suddenly goes bad to the point of being unsafe and unusable? How does the trail get fixed? Who pays for the trail restoration effort? How does the restoration project get scheduled and who restores the trail?

Hiking trails can go bad for a number of reasons including fire and insect infestation which can drop so many dead and dying trees on a trail that sections become entangled in interlocked limbs. Trees that don't fall entirely can form interlocked umbrellas of dead limbs and trunks such that over the course of several years they impose a safety hazard as limbs, trees, or previously suspended fractured trunk fragments work free and crash to the ground.

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Mountain
meteorology of Scotland Mountain meteorology of Scotland  by Proterra

Although the Scottish mountains are small by global, or even European standards, they pose a specific set of hazards, not commonly found in mountains of similar stature. An average of one-third to a half of all incidents requiring a mountain rescue call out in this country are attributed to weather, as well as poor planning and meteorological skills on the part of the people involved. In this article I'll try to explain the specifics of Scotland's mountain climatology and topography, and what effect this has on it's meteorology.

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Finding Yellowstone's
Wildlife Finding Yellowstone's Wildlife  by Arthur Digbee

Yellowstone was the world’s first national park, established to preserve the region’s thermal wonders. It has more than half of the world’s geysers, mudpots, and fumaroles, in a concentration unmatched elsewhere. So, of course, the number one reason people give for why they visit Yellowstone is . . . the wildlife. That’s a remarkable fact for the world’s most significant geothermal region. The fact that even more visitors want to see the animals underscores the remarkable wildlife resources in this magnificent park.

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Idaho's Rugged Community Idaho's Rugged Community  by mtybumpo

On August 12th 1805 Meriwether Lewis approached the continental divide having finally reached the source of the “mighty and heretofore deemed endless Missouri.” Fully expecting to see an easy route down the Columbia River on the other side of the divide he was naturally quite surprised to see more “immence [sic] ranges of high mountains still to the West... their tops partially covered with snow” (Lewis 227). What he saw were the vast mountains of present day Idaho. Crossing these “most terrible mountains” (Gass 143) would be, for the Corps of Discovery, a daunting and miserable task. Now more than 200 years later these same mountains are intentionally sought out and conquered by climbers who view them as recreational opportunities and not as obstacles to be feared and avoided. For mountain climbers the “most terrible mountains” are now most enjoyable.

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