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Lenzspitze

 
Lenzspitze

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Valais, Switzerland, Europe

Lat/Lon: 46.10460°N / 7.86850°E

Object Title: Lenzspitze

Elevation: 14088 ft / 4294 m

 

Page By: desainme

Created/Edited: Nov 7, 2001 / Jul 17, 2006

Object ID: 150653

Hits: 31358 

Page Score: 96.6%  - 61 Votes 

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Overview



Lenzspitze is one of the most famous summit of the Valais, due to its shape, a perfect three-edges-pyramid with sharp ridges and steep slants, and due to its importance in mountaineering matters.
With its 4294m, Lenzspitze is the fourth elevation of the Mischabel Chain.
It lies just North from the Dom, with a beautiful wall just above the Lenzjoch (col elevation 4121).
RIDGES
It seems a twin of the Nadelhorn, to North, and as it, its summit rises in the joining point of three marked ridges:
the NW comes from the Nadelhorn, is rocky and regular, but often covered by snow.
the ENE runs from Saas Fee in the Saastal, and here we can find the Mischabelhutte, it is the most exposed ridge of the three; on this ridges after the snowy saddle quoted 3814 mts. there are the feet of the Lenzspitze’s Grand Gendarme.
the S comes from the Dom, it’s quite difficult in the first part, from Dom to the Lenzjoch while it becomes easier in the end part to the Lenzspitze even if it gains steepness.
View in the face
 

SIDES
Lenzspitze presents three beautiful faces limited from the previously told ridges:
The SE is completely rocky and it rises from the Feegletscher, in front of the NW side of the Langflue.
The O is rocky too, and it rises steep from the Hohberggletscher, narrow between the Lenzjoch and the Nadelhorn
The NE is the only icy one, it is completely covered by the beautiful Hohbalmgletscher, between the Windgrat (where the Ulrichshorn, mts. 3925 lies) and the ridge where the Mischabelhutte lies.
THE NAME
The name Lenzspitze comes, probably, from the German term “Lenz” that means “Spring”: in fact during the Spring Equinox day, the Sun sets just behind the Lenzspitze if it is viewed from Saas Fee.

Valais Weather


Lenzspitze is usually reached by the nice S ridge, the Normal, with an easy but not obvious route along the easiest of the ridge, also windy and exposed.
Very frequented is its NE face, where the glacial environment, the inclination of the wall make this a kind of beautiful and binding ascension.
Important are also the ENE ridge, and the famous Mischabel Chain Great Traverse, here with the Dom – Lenzspitze (SW) or/and Lenzspitze – Nadelhorn (NW), parts of the remarkable traverse from Taschhorn (moving from the Mischabeljoch Biwak) to the Bordierhutte.
However, routes to this summit are quite difficult to difficult, they require good technical actions and good equipment.
The first ascension of the Lenzspitze belong to C. T. Dent, A. and F. Burgener – August 1870 by the Nadeljoch
The first Lenzspitze-Nadelhorn traverse belong to M. von Kuffner and A. Burgener – July 1894
The first Lenzspitze NE face ascension belong to O. and O. Supersaxo and D. von Bethmann-Hollweg – July 7, 1911

¤ S RIDGE (Normal) – Also linked to the Dom Traverse (Festigrat)
~ Start point
Domhutte, m. 2940 or Dom, m. 4545
~ End point
Lenzspitze, m. 4294
~ Type
- from the Domhutte, mostly PD +, two particular passages of III
- from Dom, mostly AD, with passages of III+
~ Difficult and inclination
mostly rocky ascension, on Gneiss, often friable, exposed and windy, possible ice passages.
~ Mischabel Chain Great Traverse
Mischabeljoch Biwak – (AD+) – Taschhorn – (D / D+) – Dom – (AD / PD+) – Lenzspitze – (AD+ / D-) – Nadelhorn – (AD+) – Stecknadelhorn – (PD+) – Hohberghorn – (D / D+) – Durrenhorn – (AD+) – Bordierhutte,
or
Mischabeljoch Biwak – (AD+) – Taschhorn – (D / D+) – Dom – (AD / PD+) – Lenzspitze – (AD+ / D-) – Nadelhorn – (AD+) – Durrenhorn – (AD+) – Bordierhutte.

¤ ENE RIDGE
~ Start point
Mischabelhutte, m. 3329
~ Type
difficult, steep, on very friable Gneiss rocks and passages on ice, very exposed
~ Difficult and inclination
D -, passages of IV

¤ NE FACE
~ Start point
Mischabelhutte, m. 3329
~ Type
completely on ice, also snowy passages, crevasses, exposed along the E edge
~ Difficult and inclination
D / D+ – inclination: up to 56°

¤ NW RIDGE (Nadelhorn Traverse)
~ Start point
Nadelhorn, m. 4327
~ End point
Lenzspitze, m. 4294
~ Type
Quite difficult rocky climb, exposed, windy, snowy-frames easy to trick.
~ Difficult and inclination
mostly AD+ – incl. max. 48°
also D- – passages of IV, III+ but with possibilities to trick those most difficult, in relationship with the rocks conditions.
~ Mischabel Chain Great Traverse
Mischabeljoch Biwak – (AD+) – Taschhorn – (D / D+) – Dom – (AD / PD+) – Lenzspitze – (AD+ / D-) – Nadelhorn – (AD+) – Stecknadelhorn – (PD+) – Hohberghorn – (D / D+) – Durrenhorn – (AD+) – Bordierhutte,
or
Mischabeljoch Biwak – (AD+) – Taschhorn – (D / D+) – Dom – (AD / PD+) – Lenzspitze – (AD+ / D-) – Nadelhorn – (AD+) – Durrenhorn – (AD+) – Bordierhutte.
~ 2 words about
It represents a classic example of summits-traverse. It is not difficult like the other part of the Mischabel Chain Great Traverse from the Mischabelhutte.

Getting there

FROM MATTERTAL
The Mattertal Valley is easy to reach from any places of Switzerland and Italy too.
~ From Geneva drive along the A1 up to Lausanne, then take the A9 up to Visp. Easy speedways. In Visp is suggested to leave your own car and take the cable-train up to Zermatt, or if arrived at Visp drive in the Valley up to Tasch (the last car allowed point) then take the train. 236 kms, 3 h.
~ From Bern take the A12 up to Montreaux, on the Geneva Lake, then the A9 up to Visp. Easy speedways. In Visp is suggested to leave your car and take the cable-train up to Zermatt, or if arrived in Visp drive in the Valley up to Tasch (the last car allowed point) then take the train. 231 kms, 3 h.
~ However, if you’re moving from Italy, if in Aosta (see Monte Rosa Group or Monte Bianco di Courmayeur pages) drive to north by the E27 – S27 road up to Martigny, where take the A9 up to Visp. In Visp is suggested to leave your own car and take the cable-train up to Zermatt, or if arrived in Visp drive in the Valley up to Tasch (the last car allowed point) then take the train. 180 kms, 2 h 50 m

Refuges of the Group could be reached with lift-ways from Randa (on the road to Zermatt) and Zermatt, like: Gasenried, Randa Alpin, Taschalp.
Rappeling from Grand Gendarme...
 

FROM SAASTAL
Also the Saas Valley is easy to reach, like Mattertal Valley you’ve to move up to Visp then Stalden where the Saas Valley divides itself Mattertal Valley.
~ From Geneva drive along the A1 up to Losanne, then take the A9 up to Visp. Easy speedways. In Visp move up to Stalden, then enter the Saastal and arrive to Saas Fee, where many lift-ways stations lie. 226 kms, 2 h 50 m.
~ From Bern take the A12 up to Montreaux, on the Geneva Lake, then the A9 up to Visp. Easy speedways. In Visp move up to Stalden, then enter the Saastal and arrive to Saas Fee, where many lift-ways stations lie. 222 kms, 2 h 50 m.
~ Again, if you’re moving from Italy, as arrived to Aosta (see Monte Rosa Group or Monte Bianco di Courmayeur pages) drive to north by the E27 – S27 road up to Martigny, where take the A9 up to Visp. In Visp move up to Stalden, then enter the Saastal and arrive to Saas Fee, where many lift-ways stations lie. 162 kms, 2 h 30 m.

Main refuges of the Mischabel Group could be reached with lift-ways from Saas Fee, like: Langflue, Felskinn, Metrò Alpin to the Mittelallalinstation for the approaches to the main summits of the Group.



Swiss Geo Map

Routes

Lenzspitze is usually reached by the nice S ridge, the Normal, with an easy but not obvious route along the easiest of the ridge, also windy and exposed.
Very frequented is its NE face, where the glacial environment, the inclination of the wall make this a kind of beautiful and binding ascension.
Important are also the ENE ridge, and the famous Mischabel Chain Great Traverse, here with the Dom – Lenzspitze (SW) or/and Lenzspitze – Nadelhorn (NW), parts of the remarkable traverse from Taschhorn (moving from the Mischabelkoch Biwak) to the Bordierhutte.
However, routes to this summit are quite difficult to difficult, they require good technical actions and good equipment.
The first ascension of the Lenzspitze belong to C. T. Dent, A. and F. Burgener – August 1870 by the Nadeljoch
The first Lenzspitze-Nadelhorn traverse belong to M. von Kuffner and A. Burgener – July 1894
The first Lenzspitze NE face ascension belong to O. and O. Supersaxo and D. von Bethmann-Hollweg – July 7, 1911

¤ S RIDGE (Normal) – Also linked to the Dom Traverse (Festigrat)
~ Start point
Domhutte, m. 2940 or Dom, m. 4545
~ End point
Lenzspitze, m. 4294
~ Type
- from the Domhutte, mostly PD +, two particular passages of III
- from Dom, mostly AD, with passages of III+
~ Difficult and inclination
mostly rocky ascension, on Gneiss, often friable, exposed and windy, possible ice passages.
~ Mischabel Chain Great Traverse
Mischabeljoch Biwak – (AD+) – Taschhorn – (D / D+) – Dom – (AD / PD+) – Lenzspitze – (AD+ / D-) – Nadelhorn – (AD+) – Stecknadelhorn – (PD+) – Hohberghorn – (D / D+) – Durrenhorn – (AD+) – Bordierhutte,
or
Mischabeljoch Biwak – (AD+) – Taschhorn – (D / D+) – Dom – (AD / PD+) – Lenzspitze – (AD+ / D-) – Nadelhorn – (AD+) – Durrenhorn – (AD+) – Bordierhutte.

¤ ENE RIDGE
~ Start point
Mischabelhutte, m. 3329
~ Type
difficult, steep, on very friable Gneiss rocks and passages on ice, very exposed
~ Difficult and inclination
D -, passages of IV
Two climbers
 

¤ NE FACE
~ Start point
Mischabelhutte, m. 3329
~ Type
completely on ice, also snowy passages, crevasses, exposed along the E edge
~ Difficult and inclination
D / D+ – inclination: up to 56°

¤ NW RIDGE (Nadelhorn Traverse)
~ Start point
Nadelhorn, m. 4327
~ End point
Lenzspitze, m. 4294
~ Type
Quite difficult rocky climb, exposed, windy, snowy-frames easy to trick.
~ Difficult and inclination
mostly AD+ – incl. max. 48°
also D- – passages of IV, III+ but with possibilities to trick those most difficult, in relationship with the rocks conditions.
~ Mischabel Chain Great Traverse
Mischabeljoch Biwak – (AD+) – Taschhorn – (D / D+) – Dom – (AD / PD+) – Lenzspitze – (AD+ / D-) – Nadelhorn – (AD+) – Stecknadelhorn – (PD+) – Hohberghorn – (D / D+) – Durrenhorn – (AD+) – Bordierhutte,
or
Mischabeljoch Biwak – (AD+) – Taschhorn – (D / D+) – Dom – (AD / PD+) – Lenzspitze – (AD+ / D-) – Nadelhorn – (AD+) – Durrenhorn – (AD+) – Bordierhutte.
~ 2 words about
It represents a classic example of summits-traverse. It is not difficult like the other part of the Mischabel Chain Great Traverse from the Mischabelhutte.


Alexander Burgener (1846 - 1910)Born: Eisten in Saas, Switzerland The great guide who accompanied Mummery on many climbs First ascents include Lenzspitze , 1870

Travel from Geneva east on the A1 E25 along the north side of Lake Geneva(Leman)Lausanne then on the A9 E62 to Martigny, thence up the Rhone to Sion. Keep going east through Sierre to Visp and then turn south to Randa or Zermatt on the west side of the Mischabel or Sass Fee on its east side.

Lenzspitze is one of the most famous summit of the Valais, due to its shape, a perfect three-edges-pyramid with sharp ridges and steep slants, and due to its importance in mountaineering matters.
With its 4294m, Lenzspitze is the fourth elevation of the Mischabel Chain.
It lies just North than Dom, with a beautiful wall just above the Lenzjoch (col elevation 4121).
RIDGES
It seems a twin of the Nadelhorn, to North, and as it, its summit rises in the joining point of three marked ridges:
the NW comes from the Nadelhorn, is rocky and regular, but often covered by snow.
the ENE runs from Saas Fee in the Saastal, and here we can find the Mischabelhutte, it is the most exposed ridge of the three; on this ridges after the snowy saddle quoted 3814 mts. there are the feet of the Lenzspitze’s Grand Gendarme.
the S comes from the Dom, it’s quite difficult in the first part, from Dom to the Lenzjoch while it becomes easier in the end part to the Lenzspitze even if it gains steepness.
SIDES
Lenzspitze presents three beautiful faces limited from the previously told ridges:
The SE is completely rocky and it rises from the Feegletscher, in front of the NW side of the Langflue.
The O is rocky too, and it rises steep from the Hohberggletscher, narrow between the Lenzjoch and the Nadelhorn
The NE is the only icy one, it is completely covered by the beautiful Hohbalmgletscher, between the Windgrat (where the Ulrichshorn, mts. 3925 lies) and the ridge where the Mischabelhutte lies.
THE NAME
The name Lenzspitze comes, probably, from the German term “Lenz” that means “Spring”: in fact during the Spring Equinox day, the Sun sets just behind the Lenzspitze if it is viewed from Saas Fee.

Valais Weather



HUTS

HUTS AND "BIVOUACS"
in order: name, height, location, municipal district, owner. Open all year long.


REFUGES
in order: name, height, location, municipal district, owner, refuge phone, beds (winter room those signalled with a +). Open in summer.
1. MISCHABELHUTTE, m. 3329, NE spur of the Lenzspitze, AAC Zurich, Tel.: (+41) 028.571317, 60 beds – reach it from Saas Fee (Saastal) with an easy path in 3.30 / 4 hours, well signalled, difficult: T / E
2. DOMHUTTE, m. 2940, Festigletscher, Sec. UTO of CAS, Tel.: (+41) 028.672634, 52+5 beds – reach it from Randa (Mattertal) with a steep path in 4 / 4.30 hours, difficult: E
3. BORDIERHUTTE, m. 2886, Riedgletscher, CAS Geneva, Tel.: (+41) 028.561909, 50 beds – reach it from Gasenried (Mattertal) toward the Riedgletscher, marked track on ice with F difficult (use trad. equipment)

Bordier Hut

DomHut

Mischabel Hut


Lenzspitze From Hut

Villages

SAAS FEE
Village in the Canton of Valais (Wallis), Switzerland. 1809 inhabitants, 1803 meters height, in the Saas Valley
- Car traffic close
- Postale Code: 3920
- Dialling Code: (+41) 028-
- Tourist office, Tel.: (+41) 028.571457
- Informations:
saastal.ch
weissmies.ch
swiss railways
cable-cars, Tel.: 028.571414
lift-ways “Metrò Alpin”, Tel.: 028.572717
to sleep, Tel.: 289571440

ZERMATT
Village in the Canton of Valais (Wallis), Switzerland. 3548 inhabitants, 1616 meters height, in the Mattertal Valley
- Car traffic close
- Postale Code: 3920
- Dialling Code: (+41) 27-
- Tourist office, Tel.: (+41) 027.672828
- Informations: to the Tourist Office, tel.: 27.9668100,
e-mail
zermatt.ch
swiss railways
train Brig-Visp-Zermatt, Tel.: 027.672828

When to climb

As for other Mischabel mountains, the ascensions to this summit are possible all the year long, following the normal route by the S ridge, or also by the NW ridge in traverse by the Nadelhorn (paying much attention).
Due to the difficult of all of the routes to this summit, the exposure of the ridges where the routes run, the windy days and the dangerous presence of Verglas, the Lenzspitze is usually frequented in summer, by June to September especially in times with settled weather conditions.

Mountain Conditions

~ For the weather conditions go to the website:
GERMAN SERVICE FOR ALPS WEATHER CONDITIONS
~ For the snow / avalanches conditions go to the website:
SWISS SERVICE FOR AVALANCHE CONDITIONS




Red Tape

There are no seasonal closures or necessary permits.
Is quite important say that Zermatt is unreachable by cars. Who want to move in the Mattertal up to Zermatt must to leave the own car in Visp, or in the Stalden village and continue with train, the best way could be parking in Visp.
The same for Saas Fee, but it is easier than Zermatt to be reached, cars can reach the village but they can’t move in it.

Historical Stuff

There’re two reports nice to read, by [om] and [shadik] previously posted:

A DAY ON THE MISCHABEL PEAKS
August, 24th 1953, CAJUS JOURNAL by N. S. DIXON
See here too.


WITH SKIES AND SNOWBOARDS
1999, by SHADIK (Summitposter)

In 1999 I was there with my tele skies, and my friend was there with his snowboard. I'm not 100% shure but It might have been the first telemark descent of the NE Face. We had fantastic conditions both for the ascent which took us 4hrs and the descent which took no time at all. One of my best alpine experiences.



Bibliography + Links + Photos + Maps ( Add Info | View More Info (0 Posts) | Add a Photo )

This page is been developed following the:
CONTRIBUTORS
Zermatt city-hall
Saas Grund city-hall
TCI Touring Club Italiano – Italian Alps Costumers Service
BOOKS AND MAPS
CAR MAPS
Atlante automobilistico Italia settentrionale, 1:200000 – Touring Club Italiano, 1979
Route Planner Europe software, 1:96 – Sony Italia and TCI, 2000
TERRITORY MAPS – ROUTE MAPS
Matterhorn – Monte Rosa – Mischabel, No. 5006, 1:50.000
CNS Zermatt and Mattertal, No. 1348, 1:25.000
CNS Saastal and Mischabel, No. 284 S, 1:50.000
BOOKS
Alpes Valaisannes. Du Strahlhorn au Simplon, vol. 4
Guida al Monte Rosa: Club Alpino Italiano, vol.1-2
Guida al Gruppo dei Mischabel: Club Alpino Italiano, vol.U
Manuale di alpinismo CAAI – Le Alpi Pennine, il Gruppo del Monte Rosa, i Mischabel




Mishabel quick glance

Mischabel Elevation Ridge Accessible Hut
Nadelhorn 14,200 yes Sass yes
Lenzspitze 14,088 yes Sass yes
Dom 14,911 yes Randa yes
Taschorn 14,789 yes Tasch

Skiing/Boarding

The northeast face of the Lenzspitze was skied early on in the development of extreme sking. This was prior to Patrick Vallencant's descent of Yerupaja but quite a few years later than the first descent of Tuckermans Ravine by Toni Matt in 1939.. The northern most 14,000 foot mountain of the Mischabel Range, which displays eight Four-thousand meter peaks along its three mile crest and separates the Matt valley to the west from the Saas valley to the east the NE Face of the Lenzspitze is regularly visited by ice climbers in the Alps. The great pioneer extreme skier, Heini Holzer, managed the first ski descent in July of 1972, We are fortunate to have several ski pictures here.


WITH SKIES AND SNOWBOARDS
1999, by SHADIK (Summitposter)

In 1999 I was there with my tele skies, and my friend was there with his snowboard. I'm not 100% shure but It might have been the first telemark descent of the NE Face. We had fantastic conditions both for the ascent which took us 4hrs and the descent which took no time at all. One of my best alpine experiences.

External Links

Additions and Corrections

[ Post an Addition or Correction ]
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desainmeUntitled Comment

desainme

Hasn't voted

For three of us, Derek Augood of King’s, John Williams of St. John’s and myself, it was our first holiday in the Alps, and thanks to the patience and competence of Bob Stevenson of Sidney Sussex, it was a good holiday. But perhaps of all our expeditions, the day which stood out most clearly in our minds was the one on which we climbed the Nadelhorn, Lenzspitze and Dom.


After having spent nearly a fortnight in the Saas-Fee area we had decided that we were probably fit enough to undertake the somewhat formidable task of walking up to the Mischabel Hut, and we had arrived there the previous Thursday evening. On Friday we had climbed the Lenzspitze intending to do the traverse of the Nadelgrat, but had been forced to return the way we had come by bad weather, under the circumstances a slippery operation. Saturday had been frightful, the temperature in the hut being three degrees below freezing point, and some fresh snow had fallen. On Sunday we had made an abortive attempt to climb the Nadelhorn, but had again been forced to return, this time without reaching the top. But in spite of the wind and the cold the weather now was showing signs of improvement. Early the next morning we again packed our rucksacks and sitting round the table squeezed the last of the condensed milk into our tea and hurriedly ate unwanted food, and this time we did leave not to return, and wound our way up the boulder strewn track to the point where the two routes up the Lenzspitze and the Nadelhorn fork. As on the previous day, we climbed the Nadelhorn ridge passing, as the sun was beginning to rise, the place where we turned back, and the summit was reached about seven o’clock. This is a pleasant and easy snow ridge with approximately two hundred feet of scrambling immediately below the top. We had originally intended to do the Stecknadelhorn and, spending the night at the Dom Hut, continue to Zermatt the following day. However, my three companions decided unanimously to do the Nadelgrat traverse onto the Lenzspitze, and as it was still early, from there to do the traverse of the Lenzspitze and Dom. I can remember thinking that the Dom looked an exceedingly long way away and realising a little dismally that there was nothing for it but to agree.


The Nadelgrat is quite magnificent and I imagine well justifies its reputation as being one of the finest ridge climbs in the Saas-Fee area. One half is rock nearest the Nadelhorn and the other snow leading to the summit of the Lenzspitze. It is quite sensational (and particularly impressive in photographs), but under good conditions not difficult. We ate a sardine on the top of the Lenzspitze, and found it really hard to believe that it was indeed the same place where we had been three days previously in a driving snow- storm, and that the sunlit ridge, along which we had just come, was that razor snow edge, that had been seen disappearing so alarmingly into a deep void of grey mist and snow.


From the Lenzspitze we descended the comparatively rotten ridge to the Lenzjoch, a ridge which exhibits one amazing and terrifyingly contorted gendarme. The route at this point is fairly easy to find and there are a number of variant ways. From the Lenzjoch, Bob and I made use of our crampons by doing a short but to me rather alarming traverse across a steep frozen snow slope of about 45 degrees angle onto the main massif of the Dom. There we found that Derek and John had been waiting some time, having presumably followed the normal route which entailed doing a rock pitch, and which we thought we would avoid by a more interesting variation! Apparently the pitch was easier than it looked. From there we joined the ordinary route up the Dom from the Dom Hut, and I have no very clear picture of this part of the expedition other than a vivid impression of a snow slope, which seemed somehow to be highly symbolical of Eternity.


We climbed the whole day on two ropes except on the descent or crossing glaciers, when we went on one, Bob and I together and John and Derek. The whole day we met only one other party on their way up the Dom as we were coming down. They had done the Lenzspitze-Dom traverse and rather surprised us by in- forming us that they had seen John’s pen-knife, which he had left on the top of the Lenzspitze, although they had apparently seen fit to leave it there, no doubt bearing indubitable witness to the absolute honesty of all mountaineering parties, but nevertheless rather irritating.


Suffering rather inordinately from that spiritual pride peculiar to all mountaineers on reaching their objective, we had a late lunch on the top of the Dom, ending traditionally with Kendal Mint Cake. It was exceedingly pleasant. There was a slight breeze, and if the temperature was not exactly conducive to sun-bathing, at least the sky was cloudless, everywhere there were mountains and below in a thousand valleys were little isolated patches of mist. Near to, the Matterhorn appeared as a somewhat cheeky rocky prominence registering a certain individualism which did not seem quite to fit the scheme of things. Such independence was out of place in this panorama of giants as Monte Rosa and the Weisshorn and in the far distance Mont Blanc.


Curiously, at this height of just under fifteen thousand feet, we saw a large and colourful butterfly flitting from rock to rock as (apparently) contented as if it were in some botanical garden. John, by way of being an amateur lepidopterist, although until then unbeknown to us, was much impressed.


Before leaving the top we took our leave of Saas-Fee, which had been our H.Q. for the past fortnight, and wondered whether Heinrich Supersaxo, the head guide there, who had in the past given us much advice, was pointing at us his vast telescope on the verandah of his pension, and telling his guests (as he had told us on our first arrival) that if they looked quickly now they would be able to see four persons on the top of the Dom.


The descent to the Festijoch was fast and the afternoon sun was hot, and I for my part had omitted to put on any sun-burn cream, an omission which I afterwards regretted. The route we took, the ordinary way up the Dom was uneventful, and so long as we were on snow was well marked and made a wide, and judging by the number of recently fallen blocks of ice, necessary detour of a series of amazing ice-pinnacles. From the Festijoch, where we left the snow, we had some slight difficulty in route finding, descending a steep and extremely rotten slope leading onto the glacier, where we picked up the track again and eventually reached the Dom Hut about five o’clock.


The expedition afforded more varied aspects of Alpine climbing than we had hitherto experienced and was most enjoyable, and I think we can well recommend it to others.


Posted Feb 19, 2004 10:37 am
alpenkalbUntitled Comment

alpenkalb

Hasn't voted

This bivouac has nothing to do with the Lenzspitze.
Posted Aug 5, 2004 10:06 am

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