Welcome to SP!  -
Mont Gelè
Mountain/Rock

Mont Gelè

 
Mont Gelè

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Val d'Aosta/Valais, Italy/Switzerland, Europe

Lat/Lon: 45.90410°N / 7.36590°E

Object Title: Mont Gelè

Elevation: 11545 ft / 3519 m

 

Page By: buxlex

Created/Edited: May 1, 2004 / Feb 26, 2006

Object ID: 152574

Hits: 10486 

Page Score: 90.48%  - 32 Votes 

Vote: Log in to vote

 

Mont Gele 360deg flat

Mont Gele 360 degrees "flat". This is my favourite pano shot from my collection!

Overview

Mont Gelè, 3.519 mt., located on boundary Italy-Switzerland, divide the great Conca di By area from Valpelline right sub-valley called "Comba di Crete Seche". It's a classic "high level hike" and a great ski-mountaineering trail. Mont Gelè can be climbed from Comba di Crete Seche (via Rifugio Crete Seche) and from Conca di By (via Bivacco Regondi-Gavazzi). Both ways are good for hiking and ski-mountaineering.

Talk about Mont Gele?

Need some vocal info on Mont Gelè? Would you like to laugh at my English spoken? Here is my Skype contact (Exception: when I'm in office I'm not able to answer, because I haven't the USB phone there ...).

Getting There

Route 1 - Ruz - Via Crete Seche. Common start place: Variney village.
  • From Turin, Milan. Leave motorway A5 in Aosta Est, then follow Grand Sant Bernard tunnel direction. Once passed the second tunnel there is Variney village.
  • From Switzerland (Grand Saint Bernard Pass or Tunnel). Drive to Aosta direction. 4 km before arriving in Aosta, just before first tunnel, there is Variney village. Turn right for Valpelline and Place Moulin direction.
  • From France via Mont Blanc tunnel or Petit St. Bernard pass. Follow Aosta direction via SS n.26. or Motorway A5 (get out at AOSTA OVEST, because there isn't an exit in Aosta Est driving from Aosta to Turin direction). Once reached Aosta, follow Grand St. Bernard direction. If you are on the old road for Grand St. Bernard, it joins the new one at Variney. Follow Valpelline, Place Moulin Lake direction. From Variney. Follow Valpelline, Place Moulin lake direction. Pass Valpelline and Oyace villages and head to Dzovennoz. In center Dzovennoz, turn left for Ruz. A "not well visible" wooden panel help for. Telephone number and open/close label of Rifugio Crete Seche are shown in it. Go ahead for 2,5 km, and park the car in Ruz tiny village, just before road became unpaved. Route 2 - Glassier - Via Bivacco Regondi From Variney, follow Valpelline, Place Moulin lake direction. Once passed Valpelline village, turn left to Ollomont. Go ahead to Glassier direction (follow always "main" road) until road ends. Park the car at the big ground square just befor to cross a little bridge, the real begin of "No. 6" trail. Warning: 150 meters before arriving at the park, there are a plenty of yellow panels. This is the footpath to Conca di By (By is pronounced as "(to) Be" in english).

    Red Tape

    No permits required, no seasonal closures, no parking pass required.

    When To Climb

    From early July until September.
    Ski mountaineering: from March to early May (it depends on snow conditions)

    Huts & Shelters

    Via Crete Seche
    1) Rifugio Crete Seche, 2.410 m. - 88 places (8 winter site) +39.0165.730030 or +39.347.0330713 (Daniele's mobile phone, hut owner)
    Winter/Spring 2006: open from February 18th, only for weekend. Booking is mandatory.
    More info at: www.rifugiocreteseche.com


    2) Bivacco Spataro, 2.600 m. - 9 places, bad conditions. It's better to use Rifugio Crete Seche (I'm not an owner's relative!)


    Via Glassier-bivacco Regondi
    1) Bivacco Nino Regondi, 2.650 m. - 16 places

    Best Map: Foglio 115 - La Valpelline, scale 1:30.000 - IGC (Istituto Geografico Centrale)


    Useful Links

    Public transport:
  • Aosta - Bionaz, from Sept 09 to June 09
  • Aosta - Bionaz, from June 10 to Sept 08
    Bus services are good for Ollomont (Glassier - Regondi) and Oyace/Bionaz (Crete Seche).

    Meteo link:
  • Meteo for Ollomont.
  • Meteo for Oyace/Bionaz

    External Links

    Additions and Corrections

    [ Post an Addition or Correction ]
    Viewing: 1-12 of 12    
    buxlexUntitled Comment

    buxlex

    Hasn't voted

    Could be. In French this is very meaningful ... in "normal" Italian is sufficient an accent. If you are a member of "Accademia della Crusca" this could be an excercise of style and perfect language knowledge.





    I beg your pardon, but I think it's more important to describe the best possible way this wonderful mountain. ;)
    Posted Feb 25, 2005 11:11 am
    nartrebUntitled Comment

    nartreb

    Hasn't voted

    OK, since the mountain is in Italian territory then any acceptable Italian spelling will do. [Italian is an official language of Switzerland too, of course.] As you say, in French it makes a big difference, and the mountain's name (and "crete seche" too) looks more French than Italian to me, hence my question. With an accent-aigu, it means "frozen mountain"; with an accent-grave it has no meaning I can guess (and wouldn't even be permitted in Modern French spelling rules).





    > I think it's more important to describe the best possible way this wonderful mountain. ;)





    I agree, but that job was already done.
    Posted Feb 25, 2005 11:39 am
    buxlexUntitled Comment

    buxlex

    Hasn't voted

    Gelé is the correct way to write it.


    As you already know, Valle d'Aosta is an italian region where French (and in 3 tiny villages German) is spoken and the language is recognize as official ... lot of topographic names are in both languages. French is used in 85% of VdA. German is used in Monte Rosa zone: Breithorn, Lyskamm, Lüdwigshöhe, Signalkuppe (swiss name for Punta Gnifetti, not used in Italy). In my little village, Issime, 340 peop., a mixed german is spoken and even topographic names are german. But that old dialect (Walser, from Wallis) are principally spoken languages then written and rules for writings are weak.





    Back to Valpelline, Crête Séche is correct and so on. Unfortunately italian keyboard has only è or é ... ê or other chars are to be typed in with ALT combinations. We are a little bit lazy ... Mont Gelé is shared between Italy-Switzerland boundary. In that Wallis (CH) portion, french is spoken. Two valleys East direction German becomes main language ... Dent d'Herens / Matterhorn should be an accetable language boundary.


    Italian, French, German and complicated local dialects ... in few squared miles there are too many ways to write, pronounce and refer to the same mountains. That's because accents don't matter! And maybe, people that are talking about the same mountain believe to compare two different.


    United States of Europe ... ehehehe ...


    Ciao!
    Posted Feb 25, 2005 8:21 pm
    desainmeUntitled Comment

    desainme

    Voted 10/10

    Time for spelling to gel? Mt Gele gets about 14,000 returns in google


    Mont Gelé gets about 12,000 and Mont Gelè gets about 250


    returns in google. Many of the 14,000 contain references to Mt. Gelé





    It would appear that alt130 is the way to key in é





    PS How does Mte Rosa mean white mountain in Walser?
    Posted Feb 25, 2005 8:45 pm
    buxlexUntitled Comment

    buxlex

    Hasn't voted

    Rosa is a kind of fonetic translation of "Roise", one of the words used to define ice in local dialect.





    So, Monte Rosa is not for "Pink Mountain", but for Iced Mountain. Forget any poethic links to "colour of the glaciers at sunset" ...
    Posted Mar 5, 2005 8:36 am
    nartrebUntitled Comment

    nartreb

    Hasn't voted

    Shouldn't it be Gelé (with an accent-aigu, not an accent-grave)?
    Posted Feb 8, 2005 10:14 am
    buxlexUntitled Comment

    buxlex

    Hasn't voted

    Could be. In French this is very meaningful ... in "normal" Italian an accent is enough. If you are a member of "Accademia della Crusca" this could be an excercise of style and perfect language knowledge.





    I beg your pardon, but I think it's more important to describe the best possible way this wonderful mountain. ;)
    Posted Feb 25, 2005 11:11 am
    nartrebUntitled Comment

    nartreb

    Hasn't voted

    OK, since the mountain is in Italian territory then any acceptable Italian spelling will do. [Italian is an official language of Switzerland too, of course.] As you say, in French it makes a big difference, and the mountain's name (and "crete seche" too) looks more French than Italian to me, hence my question. With an accent-aigu, it means "frozen mountain"; with an accent-grave it has no meaning I can guess (and wouldn't even be permitted in Modern French spelling rules).





    > I think it's more important to describe the best possible way this wonderful mountain. ;)





    I agree, but that job was already done.
    Posted Feb 25, 2005 11:39 am
    buxlexUntitled Comment

    buxlex

    Hasn't voted

    Gelé is the correct way to write it.


    As you already know, Valle d'Aosta is an italian region where French (and in 3 tiny villages German) is spoken and the language is recognize as official ... lot of topographic names are in both languages. French is used in 85% of VdA. German is used in Monte Rosa zone: Breithorn, Lyskamm, Lüdwigshöhe, Signalkuppe (swiss name for Punta Gnifetti, not used in Italy). In my little village, Issime, 340 peop., a mixed german is spoken and even topographic names are german. But that old dialect (Walser, from Wallis) are principally spoken languages then written and rules for writings are weak.





    Back to Valpelline, Crête Séche is correct and so on. Unfortunately italian keyboard has only è or é ... ê or other chars are to be typed in with ALT combinations. We are a little bit lazy ... Mont Gelé is shared between Italy-Switzerland boundary. In that Wallis (CH) portion, french is spoken. Two valleys East direction German becomes main language ... Dent d'Herens / Matterhorn should be an accetable language boundary.


    Italian, French, German and complicated local dialects ... in few squared miles there are too many ways to write, pronounce and refer to the same mountains. That's because accents don't matter! And maybe, people that are talking about the same mountain believe to compare two different.


    United States of Europe ... ehehehe ...


    Ciao!
    Posted Feb 25, 2005 8:21 pm
    desainmeUntitled Comment

    desainme

    Voted 10/10

    Time for spelling to gel? Mt Gele gets about 14,000 returns in google


    Mont Gelé gets about 12,000 and Mont Gelè gets about 250


    returns in google. Many of the 14,000 contain references to Mt. Gelé





    It would appear that alt130 is the way to key in é





    PS How does Mte Rosa mean white mountain in Walser?
    Posted Feb 25, 2005 8:45 pm
    buxlexUntitled Comment

    buxlex

    Hasn't voted

    Rosa is a kind of fonetic translation of "Roise", one of the words used to define ice in local dialect.





    So, Monte Rosa is not for "Pink Mountain", but for Iced Mountain. Forget any poethic links to "colour of the glaciers at sunset" ...
    Posted Mar 5, 2005 8:36 am
    desainmeUntitled Comment

    desainme

    Voted 10/10

    I looked at Swissgeo and Google Earth and they both suggest that the following is the location of Mont Gelé


    Latitude: 45.904


    Longitude: 7.366


    Both programs display the big summit snow field extending toward Italy. This is also prominent in the photos taken from the southwest. Both programs also show Mont Gelé as due south of the south end of Lac de Mauvoisin.
    Posted Aug 20, 2005 10:43 am

    Viewing: 1-12 of 12    

    Images