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Bachimala

 
Bachimala

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Huesca / Hautes Pyrenees, France/Spain, Europe

Lat/Lon: 42.69970°N / 0.39561°E

Object Title: Bachimala

Elevation: 10423 ft / 3177 m

 

Page By: eza

Created/Edited: Apr 21, 2003 / Jun 17, 2012

Object ID: 151576

Hits: 9380 

Page Score: 80.49%  - 12 Votes 

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Overview

 
Routes to Bachimala
 

A beautiful and quite isolated three-thousander of the Pyrenees, easy to walk up and not too crowded. The first succesful climb was performed by F. Schrader and H. Passet on the 11th August 1878. Due to its standing far from the main roads, it is not well known by the general public and there are even some doubts about its real height. The National Geographic Institutes of Spain and France give to Bachimala a height of 3174 meters. Anyway, the trip allows good sights of the Posets /Llardana massif. The south face is reached by means of the spanish valley of Plan, while the north side climbs start from the french valley of Louron (Val Louron).
Between Bachimala and Bielsa you will also find some of the wildest and most unspoiled locations of the spanish Pyrenees.

Getting There

 
Plan and Bachimala
 
ROAD ACCESS: For the south face routes, start from Plan (spanish Province of Huesca). From Huesca, take road N240 to Barbastro (49 km). After that, it's road C1311 northwards (9 km) until you find a crossing and follow the signals to El Grado. Turn left there and enter road C138, which will take you after 59 km to Aínsa (via El Grado and puerto de El Pino). There will be only 39 km left then, first by driving northwards on road HU640 (across Labuerda and Escalona) and turning right after Salinas for a final 13 km drive to Plan. This is a rather narrow road, try not to take in the dark and driving will be much more enjoyable (apart from the great views!). After Plan, the final approach to Biadós Hut takes a further 3 km by road and 10 km more of a not too good dirt road. When you reach the final fork of this dirt road, turn right for Biadós and left for Tabernes Hut.
For a climb from the french side of the border, the only available road approach begins at the road linking Arreau and Bagnéres de Luchon (via Loudenvielle and Col de Peyresourde). There is a road starting somewhere around Loudenvielle and running south, following the Valley of the Neste de Louron. The end of this road is placed at the north side of Bachimala at Pont du Prat, (about 1250 m high).
BY BUS: Up to this moment, I haven't been able to find any suitable bus connection to Plan. The best I can say for the moment is to catch buses to Ainsa (see www.alosa.es)and arrange private transport afterwards. I will post any other news on this subject as soon as I get them
NEAREST AIRPORTS: The closest airports are placed in Barcelona (about 300 km away), Zaragoza (about 200 km) and Toulouse. From this last airport you can get to both sides of the mountain (the border can be crossed easily by means of the nearby Tunnel of Bielsa).
RAILWAY ACCESS: The nearest rail stations are the ones at Sabiñánigo and Barbastro. This means that a minimum of eighty kilometers will stand between you and Bachimala from any of them. Additional transport will therefore be required (see "Bus access").
 
 Bachimala (right with...
 

Red Tape

No need for permits. Consider taking your skis in winter, the normal route from Biadós ("Collado de Señal") is good for mountain skiing. It can be done in about 90% of the route, from the fore-summit (3050 m) downwards.

Where to stay

The mountain is, as already said, quite isolated. The nearest spanish village is Plan, thirteen kilometers south. Consider staying the night before in one of the small hotels of the village. Another possibility is the mountain hut of Biadós, placed south of the mountain at the junction of the two Cinqueta Valleys. Camping is (as far as I know) allowed nearby. There is also a small unguarded hut on the west side of the mountain (Tabernes Hut).
For the french (northern) routes, start from Pont du Prat (1250 m). There is a hut on the eastern side of the mountain (La Soula Hut - 1710 m), but up to this moment I haven't got much information about it.

Is it going to rain?

For weather information, one of the most reliable sources that I know of is the French Institute of Meteorology (http://www.meteo.fr). You can also trust the Spanish Institute (http://www.inm.es) and http://www.barrabes.com/eltiempo/meteo.asp (this is a private web page of a mountaineering shop in Benasque, Spain. It offers good weather information).

External Links

  • Summitpost Monte Perdido Page
    Contains some references on how to get to the base of Bachimala (see route Valley of Pineta)
  • Refugio de Biadós: Spanish language data on location of the hut and contact details.

    Additions and Corrections

    [ Post an Addition or Correction ]
    Viewing: 1-10 of 10    
    ezaUntitled Comment

    eza

    Hasn't voted

    I agree with your excellent information, though it is not really clear to me wether Pic Pétard/Pic Tonnerre is one of the names of the Bachimala massif or the name of a lower peak placed nearby in France. I recently read "Souvenirs d'un montagnard" by count Russell and this last option seemed to be the one accepted by him (as far as I recall). Nonetheless, Pico Schrader is surely the highest point in the massif. No doubt about that. As of today, I am going to change the heading of the page: "Gran Bachimala" instead of the actual one.
    Posted Sep 4, 2003 8:20 am
    Diego SahagúnUntitled Comment

    Diego Sahagún

    Voted 10/10

    Ya veo que al final te has quedado con Bachimala, la verdad es que es igual, lo importante no son los nombres sino el pico ¿Qué tal el libro de Rusell? ¿No se hace pesado?
    Posted Sep 5, 2003 4:46 am
    ezaUntitled Comment

    eza

    Hasn't voted

    No, la verdad es que no se hace pesado. Tiene una cosa buena, que es que se puede leer a ratos sueltos y monte por monte. Así es como lo he hecho yo y resulta incluso entretenido ver cómo se lo montaban hace ciento y pico de años en los mismos sitios que pisamos hoy cualquier fin de semana.
    Posted Sep 5, 2003 6:09 am
    Diego SahagúnUntitled Comment

    Diego Sahagún

    Voted 10/10

    Franz Schrader (1844-1924) was a geographer native of Bordeaux and an excellent cartoonist. They say that he went to Los Pirineos for taking some panoramic notes but he was attracted by the range soul (as Whymper with the Alps) when looking at a sunset at Néouville. His cartographic works and his drawings have an excellet quality. The name of of the peak is still polemic, the French called it Pico Schrader but they really know that is the highest point in the Bachimala massif.





    Anyway, it's also called Gran Bachimala, Machimala, Pic Pétard or Pic Tonnerre.
    Posted Sep 4, 2003 8:13 am
    Diego SahagúnUntitled Comment

    Diego Sahagún

    Voted 10/10

    IGN of Spain, IGN of France and Henri Braudimont show 3.174 m / 10,413 ft in their maps
    Posted Sep 4, 2003 8:19 am
    ezaUntitled Comment

    eza

    Hasn't voted

    I agree with your excellent information, though it is not really clear to me wether Pic Pétard/Pic Tonnerre is one of the names of the Bachimala massif or the name of a lower peak placed nearby in France. I recently read "Souvenirs d'un montagnard" by count Russell and this last option seemed to be the one accepted by him (as far as I recall). Nonetheless, Pico Schrader is surely the highest point in the massif. No doubt about that. As of today, I am going to change the heading of the page: "Gran Bachimala" instead of the actual one.
    Posted Sep 4, 2003 8:20 am
    Diego SahagúnUntitled Comment

    Diego Sahagún

    Voted 10/10

    Ya veo que al final te has quedado con Bachimala, la verdad es que es igual, lo importante no son los nombres sino el pico ¿Qué tal el libro de Rusell? ¿No se hace pesado?
    Posted Sep 5, 2003 4:46 am
    ezaUntitled Comment

    eza

    Hasn't voted

    No, la verdad es que no se hace pesado. Tiene una cosa buena, que es que se puede leer a ratos sueltos y monte por monte. Así es como lo he hecho yo y resulta incluso entretenido ver cómo se lo montaban hace ciento y pico de años en los mismos sitios que pisamos hoy cualquier fin de semana.
    Posted Sep 5, 2003 6:09 am
    ojoViadós.

    Voted 10/10

    Hi there. If you would like, you can attach my Viadós Refuge page to this one.. I've just re-written/re-posted it. cheers.jane.
    Posted Sep 26, 2011 11:08 am
    ezaRe: Viadós.

    eza

    Hasn't voted

    Done, thanks for letting me know, Jane.

    Cheers. Enrique
    Posted Sep 26, 2011 1:44 pm

    Viewing: 1-10 of 10    

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