Mount Langley

Page Type
Mountain/Rock
Location:
California, United States, North America
Activities:
Hiking, Mountaineering, Trad Climbing, Scrambling, Skiing
Season:
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter
Elevation:
14026 ft / 4275 m
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Mount Langley
Created On: Mar 23, 2001
Last Edited On: Jul 13, 2007

Overview

Mount Langley is one of the easiest California Fourteeners to climb if the Army Pass route is chosen. Langley provides a great view of the south Sierra in all directions from the summit, including the Mount Whitney group, the Great Western Divide, Olancha Peak, and Owen's Valley. It is the southernmost fourteener, and the most desert-like of the Sierra Nevada fourteeners. The North and South faces provide excellent technical rock climbing, while Old Army Pass and the south slopes provide an easy walk-up.

Getting There

Take US-395 to Lone Pine, CA, and head west on Whitney Portal Road. After a couple of miles, turn left at a sign to Horseshoe Meadows Road and follow it to the Cottonwood Lakes/Army Pass trailhead. Make sure you turn right at the sign indicating Cottonwood Lakes, otherwise you will end up at the trailhead for Cottonwood Pass. There is a walk-in campground, bear boxes and toilets at the trailhead, as well as ample parking.

Red Tape

The quota in the Inyo National Forest is from May 1st through November 1st and permits can be obtained from any one of the four Ranger Stations: Mono Lake in Lee Vining, Mammoth Lakes Visitor Center in Mammoth, White Mountain Ranger Station in Bishop or Lone Pine Ranger Station in Lone Pine.

There are 60 spots on the quota. 60% (36) of the quotas are held for reservations. The other 40% (24) are for walk-in permits.

It costs $5.00 per person to reserve a permit in advance. All other times of the year have no quota on trail users, but require a wilderness permit, which can be obtained free at the ranger station in Lone Pine. The mountain is always open, but the road is not plowed during winter. For example, in 2002, the road opened in late April (some have been known to open up the gates and proceed up anyway, especially in low snow years like 2002 - however this is illegal). Go here for more information on permits.

When To Climb

The best hiking and rock climbing is during June through early October. Good mountaineering snow is present from May through July. This peak can be snowshoed up in winter, but is very far, with the road not being plowed (see above for the road access conditions. In 2002 a party was able to climb the mountain in February by driving all the way to the main trailhead.

Camping

Overnight wilderness permits are required at all times. There are use quotas in effect from May 1 to November 1. Obtained permits from the ranger stations in Lee Vining, Bishop or Lone Pine. If under quotas, make reservations is advance. More information can be found at the Inyo National Forest Visitor Center.

Outstanding spots for a basecamp can be found around the Cottonwood Lakes, in particular lake # 3.

Mountain Conditions

Check www.395.com for current conditions, or call the Inyo National Forest Rangers at (760) 873-2400 for conditions. Daily report at the ranger station.

Another nice source for weather data is Howard Sheckter's webpage out of Mammoth Lakes.

External Links

Additions and CorrectionsPost an Addition or Correction

Viewing: 1-15 of 15

Romain

Romain - Nov 5, 2002 11:02 pm - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

Morgan,


Thanks.


The benchmark on the summit of Langley is here. Not sure I can spot a date on it. Does it have special significance?


Romain

mpbro

mpbro - Dec 15, 2002 2:16 pm - Voted 10/10

Untitled Comment

Sorry, I missed this post and didnt' reply earlier...





If I read it correctly, I see "14042" on there, which would be the surveyed elevation in feet. Unless a more recent survey has been done, this answers the question!

Romain

Romain - Dec 29, 2002 12:28 am - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

Morgan,


Those dual elevation data are annoying. I'm going with the USGS website, under the assumption that it reflects the most recent survey. The GNIS displays an elevation of 14026, I assume that the marker must reflect older data...


Cheers,


Romain

Romain

Romain - Jul 14, 2005 4:49 pm - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

Fixed. Thanks!

Romain

Romain - Oct 17, 2005 11:20 pm - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

Fixed. Thanks.

mpbro

mpbro - Jul 4, 2002 9:52 pm - Voted 10/10

Untitled Comment

The most recent USGS topographical map quotes an elevation of 4275 meters, or when multiplied by 3.281, 14026 feet.





Did you note the date of the benchmark on the summit?

Romain

Romain - Nov 5, 2002 11:02 pm - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

Morgan,


Thanks.


The benchmark on the summit of Langley is here. Not sure I can spot a date on it. Does it have special significance?


Romain

mpbro

mpbro - Dec 15, 2002 2:16 pm - Voted 10/10

Untitled Comment

Sorry, I missed this post and didnt' reply earlier...





If I read it correctly, I see "14042" on there, which would be the surveyed elevation in feet. Unless a more recent survey has been done, this answers the question!

Romain

Romain - Dec 29, 2002 12:28 am - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

Morgan,


Those dual elevation data are annoying. I'm going with the USGS website, under the assumption that it reflects the most recent survey. The GNIS displays an elevation of 14026, I assume that the marker must reflect older data...


Cheers,


Romain

Shano

Shano - Jun 9, 2004 11:51 am - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

Another option for approaching Mount Langley is via Tuttle Creek. From the Stone House, continue up-canyon (the low path seems to be the easier ascent route) past the Keyhole Wall and up another mile until you reach the pseudo-basin at the Northeastern foot of Mount Langley. Running water and level white sand "beaches" can be found with a great view of the NE side of the peak.


A number of 2nd and 3rd class routes can be attempted from this side

Shano

Shano - Jun 9, 2004 11:57 am - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

I should also mention that there are certainly much more difficult AIx, 4th & 5th class routes as well; your imagination is the only limit here

inyoface - Jul 13, 2005 4:09 pm - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

The quota in the Inyo National Forest is actually from May 1st through November 1st and permits can be obtained from any one of the four Ranger Stations on the Forest: Mono Lake in Lee Vining, Mammoth Lakes Visitor Center in Mammoth, White Mountain Ranger Station in Bishop and yes, the Lone Pine Ranger Station in Lone Pine.

Romain

Romain - Jul 14, 2005 4:49 pm - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

Fixed. Thanks!

maj

maj - Oct 16, 2005 3:05 am - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/inyo/recreation/wild/permitsres.shtml

Romain

Romain - Oct 17, 2005 11:20 pm - Hasn't voted

Untitled Comment

Fixed. Thanks.

Viewing: 1-15 of 15









Mount Langley

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253 Images 363 Climber's Log Entries 15 Comments 15 Additions & Corrections

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